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RJ216, Vegetable Yield Evaluations and Nutritional Content

RJ216, Vegetable Yield Evaluations and Nutritional Content

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This bulletin describes one part in a series of three projects conducted in 2009 and 2010 at the University of Wyoming's Sheridan Research and Extension Center. Peppers, tomatoes, and eggplants were grown both years in the field, in a high tunnel, or under row covers. Yields of each plant type were recorded, and total phenols, total flavonoids, and antioxidants were determined at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Small Molecule Analysis Lab. Results of yields and nutritional status depended on plant type and whether the plants were grown in the field, in a high tunnel, or under row covers. Tables of yield data and graphs of nutritional contents are included.
This bulletin describes one part in a series of three projects conducted in 2009 and 2010 at the University of Wyoming's Sheridan Research and Extension Center. Peppers, tomatoes, and eggplants were grown both years in the field, in a high tunnel, or under row covers. Yields of each plant type were recorded, and total phenols, total flavonoids, and antioxidants were determined at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Small Molecule Analysis Lab. Results of yields and nutritional status depended on plant type and whether the plants were grown in the field, in a high tunnel, or under row covers. Tables of yield data and graphs of nutritional contents are included.

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categoriesTypes, Research, Science
Published by: University of Wyoming Extension on May 22, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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08/07/2012

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RJ-216May 2012
Karen L. Panter and Adrienne O. Tatman
Vegetable YieldEvaluations andNutritional Contents
 
Vegetable Yield Evaluationsand Nutritional Contents
Authors:
Karen L. Panter
, Extension Horticulture Specialist, Department of Plant Sciences
Adrienne O. Tatman
, former Research Associate, Sheridan Research and Extension Center
 Issued in furtherance of extension work, acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. De- partment of Agriculture. Glen Whipple, director, University of Wyoming Extension, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071.Persons seeking admission, employment, or access to programs of the University of Wyoming shall be consid-ered without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, age, political belief, veteran status,sexual orientation, and marital or familial status. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means forcommunication or program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact their local UW 
 Extension ofce. To le a complaint, write to the UW Employment Practices/Afrmative Action Ofce, Univer
-sity of Wyoming, Department 3434, 1000 E. University Avenue, Laramie, WY 82071.
Editor: Robert Waggener, Waggener Editorial Services, Laramie, Wyoming
Graphic Designer: Bernadette van der Vliet, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Ofce of 
Communications and TechnologyFunds for this project were provided through the Wyoming Department of Agriculture and the USDAsSpecialty Crop Block Grant Program
 
T
his bulletin describes one part in a series of three projects conducted in 2009 and 2010 at the Uni-versity of Wyoming’s Sheridan Research and Extension Center. Peppers, tomatoes, and eggplants
were grown both years in the eld, in a high tunnel, or under row covers. Yields of each plant typewere recorded, and total phenols, total avonoids, and antioxidants were determined at the University
of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Small Molecule Analysis Lab. Results of yields and nutritional status depended
on plant type and whether the plants were grown in the eld, in a high tunnel, or under row covers.
Tables of yield data and graphs of nutritional contents are included.Funded by a Wyoming Department of Agriculture Specialty Crop Block GrantProgram grant, the overall goal of this proj-ect was to develop and promote sustainablespecialty horticultural practices for Wyoming.
The specic objective was to evaluate several
vegetable crops for yield and nutritional contentusing different fertilization levels. Basic yieldsas well as nutritional information gained from
laboratory analyses of total phenols, total avo
-noids, and antioxidant activity will be valuableto vegetable producers and consumers alike.
Nutritional parameters of total avonoids,
total phenols, and antioxidants were assessedas these are important in overall human health.Flavonoids, naturally occurring compoundsfound in many plants, number more than 4,000.They can be found in many fruits, vegetables,and beverages including cranberry, apple, pea-nut, chocolate, onion, tea, and red wine. Flavo-noids have antioxidant activity, meaning theyhelp neutralize free radicals (Cleveland Clinic,2011), which can cause cancer and contributeto the aging process. Flavonoids act againstcardiovascular diseases, ulcers, viruses, arthri-tis, and other ailments (Patel, 2008). Phenolsare strong antioxidants as well, preventing freeradical damage and decreasing chances of cancer and cardiovascular disease (Hollman,2001). Antioxidants in general, as measured byoxygen radical absorbance capacity, are knownto help eliminate free radicals from the body.Antioxidants can be found in a large varietyof fruits, nuts, and vegetables (Nutrient DataLaboratory, 2007).
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