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DAILY 05.25.12

DAILY 05.25.12

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Published by coo9486
Print edition of The Stanford Daily, published May 25, 2012,
Print edition of The Stanford Daily, published May 25, 2012,

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By AARON SEKHRI
STAFF WRITER
Douglas Oberhelman, CEO andchairman of Caterpillar Inc., empha-sized the long-term planning neces-sary to run his company in contrastwith the start-up mindset of SiliconValley in a speech Thursday night inCemex Auditorium.“We have to start planning now forthe short, medium and long-term sowe can be around for another 85years,” Oberhelman said. “We have todeal with 10-year product cycles. Canyou even imagine that happeningover here?”Outside the auditorium, a handfulof students protested Oberhelman’spresence on campus and Caterpillar’sbusiness practices in the Middle East.While introducing Oberhelman,Graduate School of Business (GSB)Dean Garth Saloner credited Cater-pillar Inc. — an 85-year-old companythat is currently the world’s largestproducer of construction and miningequipment, diesel and natural gas en-gines, and industrial gas turbines —with having its “fingers on the pulse of the world.”“If you want to see where infra-structure development will fuelgrowth tomorrow,” Saloner said, “youshould look at where Caterpillar isgetting its orders today.”During his talk, which was part of the GSB’s View From The Top speak-er series, Oberhelman discussed thestrategic value of working in emerg-ing markets, commenting on the pos-sibility of Caterpillar expanding toBrazil, the Middle East and Africa.“Everyone in emerging marketsright now wants to live like us, and wewant to help them do that,” Oberhel-man said.“I couldn’t imagine saying so whenI first started working at Caterpillar,but I can see the day coming when wewill have our first production facilitysomewhere in Africa,” he added.The presentation took the formatof a “fireside chat,” with questionsposed to Oberhelman by a GSB stu-dent. When asked what the compa-ny’s three most pressing challengesare, Oberhelman answered accounta-bility, a connection with customersand asset allocation.“Responsibility gets diffused in abig company, and when it’s all goingwell, that doesn’t really matter,” hesaid. “But when things start slowingdown, the finger-pointing starts.He said his proudest accomplish-ment would be leaving behind a lega-cy of changing the company’s corpo-rate culture.Oberhelman, CEO of Caterpil-lar since November 2010, said themost vital part of his job has beencommunication. He credited socialmedia with simplifying the task, butsaid it hasn’t completely solvedtheproblem.
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Bradley Klahn advancesto NCAA Sweet Sixteen
By CHARLOTTE WAYNE
COPY EDITOR
“When everything goes well, it might look like you don’tneed the nation state, but it turns out that when things be-come tough, that’s the only thing that you have,” said DaniRodrik, a professor of international political economy at theJohn F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard Univer-sity, Thursday in Annenberg Auditorium.The Center for Ethics in Society hosted Rodrik’s lecture,which was titled “Who Needs the Nation State?” and deliv-ered as the annual Arrow Lecture on Ethics and Leadership.During the presentation, Rodrik defended the concept of a nation state, which he defined as any smaller, self-governedbody as contrasted to a global polity. He began by outliningkey criticisms of the nation state, primarily those from felloweconomists who emphasize the inefficiency of transactioncosts caused by national borders, which impede global trade.“This sort of looks like it’s hundred dollar bills lying on theproverbial pavement to the economists,” Rodrik said. “Itmeans that we should basically pick up these hundred dollar
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 An Independent Publication
 www.stanforddaily.com
 The Stanford Daily T
FRIDAY Volume 241
May 25, 2012Issue 68
 Akeen Valdez escorted from campusmore than two months after incident
By BRENDAN O’BYRNE AND KURT CHIRBAS
On Feb. 15, a Toyon residential staff member alerted twoUniversity officials that Akeen Valdez, who is not a Stanford stu-dent but was living in Toyon with a resident, had been accusedof sexual assault by a female Toyon resident. It would be morethan a month before a stay-away letter was issued againstValdez, and more than two months before he would be escortedoff campus by University officials.The staff member reported the incident to the ResidenceDean of Toyon and Stern Hall, Arcadio Morales, and Dean of Sexual Assault Angela Exson on Feb. 15, two days after the al-leged assault occurred. University officials suspected he waslodging in Sigma Chi and Florence Moore Hall (FloMo) in ad-dition to Toyon.No further contact between the Toyon staff member and ad-ministrators occurred until two weeks later, on Feb. 28, whenValdez was again spotted in Toyon, after he and his Stanford-student host were told by the staff member that Valdez wouldnot be allowed back in the dorm. The following day, this samestaff member requested a meeting with Morales, at which pointMorales said that he had informed staff at Sigma Chi to look outfor Valdez, that FloMo was too large of a hall to contact and thathe thought that Valdez would stay away from Toyon after beingasked to do so by the staff member.Scott Galey’12, a resident assistant (RA) of Sigma Chi, toldThe Daily he does not recall receiving a phone call or alert fromMorales or any other University official. Galey was not aware of Valdez or any other lodger in Sigma Chi.Guests who stay for three consecutive days or five days in asingle quarter in Stanford housing are required to register withthe Stanford Housing front desk, according to guest policy.Housing strengthened policies preventing illegal lodgers fol-lowing an “incident” that occurred several years ago, according
Lodger accusedof sexual assault
SPEAKERS & EVENTS
CaterpillarCEO talksleadership
SPEAKERS & EVENTS
Harvard professordefends nation states
 
MEHMET INONU/The Stanford Daily
Three students protested outside a talk by Douglas Oberhelman, Caterpillar CEO, Thursday. Students for Palestinian Equal Rights (SPER) has advocated for University divestment from Caterpillar, citing its Middle East business practices.
Please see
LODGER
, page 2
Oberhelman discusses strategicimportance of emerging markets
MEHMET INONU/The Stanford Daily
Caterpillar CEO Douglas Oberhelman discussed the long-term planningnecessary to run his company Thursday at Cemex Auditoriu. His talk was partof the Graduate School of Business View from the Top speaker series.
Please see
CEO
, page 2Please see
RODRIK 
, page 2
NEWS BRIEF
Three Books selectionsinspired by opening of Bing Concert Hall
By THE DAILY NEWS STAFF
While its title may suggest otherwise,this year’s “Three Books” program willonly include one physical book.The Office of Undergraduate Advis-ing and Research announced the threetexts chosen for the program on Tuesday.The selections, provided by courtesy to allincoming members of the Class of 2016,include the DVD documentary “My KidCould Paint That” by New York Timescritic Michael Kimmelman, the smart-phone application “Smule” by StanfordAssistant Professor of Music Ge Wangand “Fargo Rock City: A Heavy MetalOdyssey in Rural North Dakota,” a mem-oir written by Chuck Klosterman.Incoming freshmen will receive theDVD and memoir by mail in July, and willbe able to download the smartphone appwhen they arrive on-campus.Mark Applebaum, associate profes-sor of music, is responsible for this year’s
Please see
BRIEF
, page 2
 ALISA ROYER/The Stanford Daily
Sandy Lerner, co-founder of Cisco Systems, gave a reading from her book “Second Impressions,” published under the pen name AvaFarmer, Thursday in the Stanford Bookstore. The book is a sequel to Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice,” set 10 years after the novel.
Making an “Impression”
 
“When conducting the big or-chestra that is 150,000 employees,you can get lost easily,” he said.“You have to communicate, com-municate, communicate, and letthat information cascade down.”Oberhelman also touched oncultivating leadership within thecompany, praising its internalstrength as the reason that Cater-pillar has never had an outsideCEO in its history. He describedhis managerial philosophy as onethat strives to develop “a deep setof values” that are universalizedacross the company.“It doesn’t matter whether youare in Palo Alto, Peoria, Ill., Brus-sels or Moscow; people just wantto know what the rules are, andthey want a level playing-fieldwhere they know exactly how theycan succeed,” he said.He added that it is importantfor a leader to get “direct and hon-est feedback.” Oberhelman saidhe has taken an unconventionalstrategy of visiting plants aroundthe world and unassumingly ap-proaching random employees.“As CEO, you never get anyhonest feedback, ‘Everything’s just always going great!’” he said.“And I wanted to get past that.”He also touched on the topic of innovation, and argued that it “isnothing but a buzzword unlessyou actually loosen the reins of creativity.” He went on to de-scribe a virtual reality simulatorat a Caterpillar R&D office as animplementation of innovationwithin the company.Audience member ParabalSingh ’15 reflected positively onOlberhelman’s ideas.“I loved the talk because he wasmore honest than almost anybodyI have seen present,” Singh said.Protesters outside, however,carried placards with messagessuch as “The Wall Must Fall” and“Say No to Caterpillar Violationsof International Law,” attemptingto highlight Caterpillar’s role inthe construction of the West BankBarrier and the provision of bull-dozers to Israeli defense forces ascritical grievances.“They’re supplying tools to theoccupation,” said Itai Farhi ’14,vice president of Students forPalestinian Equal Rights(SPER). “It’s wrong to be contin-uing to profit from the stealing of land.”While SPER has consistentlyadvocated University divestmentfrom companies associated withthe Israeli occupation of Palestin-ian territories, Farhi acknowledgedthat as demonstrated by thesmall number of protesters, whichat one point numbered three —the cause has yet to gain tractionwith the Stanford student body.“None of what we’re sayingshould be surprising to people,”Farhi said. “People know thatthere are a lot of things that aren’tright, and it shouldn’t be as weirdas it seems to be to say ‘this mat-ters.’”“Those [issues] are things thatany person with a conscienceshould care about,” he added.“This isn’t a radical issue or evenan activist issue — this is an ethicsissue.”
Marshall Watkins contributed to this report.
Contact Aaron Sekhri at asekhri@ stanford.edu.
CEO
Continued from front page
bills by getting rid of nationstates, getting rid of these juris-dictional boundaries, discontinu-ities in the global economy.”Rodrik pointed to ethical ar-guments by “moral cosmopoli-tans,” who question the validityof national distinctions.“It’s a totally artificial bound-ary,” Rodrik said, paraphrasingthe arguments of his critics.“Moreover, it’s becoming moreand more artificial in terms of im-provements in communicationand transportation technolo-gies.”Paradoxically, nation statesboth enable and impede global-ization by providing the institu-tions required by global tradewhile introducing regulatory bar-riers, Rodrik said.“This paradox requires us tomanage the role of the nationstate, to maintain this balance in away, because the danger of tryingto push markets beyond what theexisting regulatory agents cansupport is that we get too muchmarkets, too little governments,and therefore a lot of instability,Rodrik said, highlighting the2008 global financial collapse asevidence that nation states are re-quired to pick up the pieces aftereconomic crises.“It was governments thatstepped in to bail out the banks, toprovide the safety nets and pumpup demand and print the money,Rodrik said. “Most typically, in theEuro Zone, we’ve seen how whatseems to be a transnationalist proj-ect depends so much on the choic-es that individual nation statesmake, and ultimately all the re-sponsibility for everything that hasgone wrong — and for the littlethat has gone right has beenlaid at the feet of national politi-cians.”Earlier in the day, Rodrikspoke to eight students inCrothers Memorial Hall throughthe dorm’s Global Citizenshipprogram, in a discussion moder-ated by Ishan Nath ’12.Rodrik presented data show-ing that Europeans surveyedidentified only slightly more ascitizens of the European Unionthan as global citizens. The EuroZone debt crisis was the topic of numerous audience queries inthe question-and-answer sessionthat followed Rodrik’s lecture.“The fact that certainly Ger-mans don’t feel they are the samepolitical community as theGreeks and that differencecreates an apparently insur-mountable obstacle to the cre-ation of Europe-wide institu-tions, that makes the economicand financial integration projectsunsustainable,” Rodrik said. “Eu-rope is going through preciselythe tensions that I’ve tried toidentify here, and is doing it in avery vivid and real-time kind of fashion.”One student audience mem-ber criticized the event’s out-reach.“The talk was almost identicalto other Ethics in Society events,”said audience member Joe Ri-vano Barros ’14. “Few studentswere in the audience, and fewerstill were asking questions, withonly faculty or gray-haired localsremotely engaging with thespeaker.“It was interesting that he did-n’t really question the nation stateas a construct,” he added, “butstuck to the question of the role of the nation state, given that it’s hereto stay, in a globalized world.”
Contact Charlotte Wayne at crwayne@ stanford.edu.
RODRIK 
Continued from front page
By ALICE PHILLIPS
DESK EDITOR
This report covers a selectionof incidents from May 15through May 21 as recorded inthe Stanford Department of Public Safety bulletin.
TUESDAY, MAY 15
I
A bike was stolen from out-side of Soto in Wilbur Hall be-tween 1:30 a.m. and 8:40 a.m.
I
An iPad was stolen from Hil-lel between 3 a.m. and 12 p.m.
I
A bike was stolen from out-side of the Escondido V highrise between 1 p.m. and 6:30p.m.
I
A laptop was stolen from La-gunita Dining between 6:30p.m. and 6:35 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16
I
A bike was stolen from out-side of Adams House be-tween 12:01 a.m. on May 15and 8:45 a.m. on May 16.
I
A bike was stolen from out-side of Loro in FlorenceMoore Hall between 8 p.m. onMay 14 and 11:45 a.m. on May16.
THURSDAY, MAY 17
I
No incidents were reported.
FRIDAY, MAY 18
I
A bike was stolen from infront of Florence Moore Hallbetween 10 p.m. on May 16and 9 a.m. on May 18.
I
Two males were transportedto the San Jose Main Jail andbooked for vandalism nearthe intersection of ArguelloWay and Serra Street at 2:38p.m.
I
A male was cited and releasedfor being a minor in posses-sion of alcohol at 9:30 p.m.near 675 Lomita Drive.
I
A female was transported tothe San Jose Main Jail andbooked for being publicly in-toxicated near the intersec-tion of Governor’s Avenueand Campus Drive West at ap-proximately 11:15 p.m.
SATURDAY, MAY 19
I
A male was transported to theSan Jose Main Jail and bookedfor being publicly intoxicatednear the intersection of Lane Aand Nathan Abbott Way at12:26 a.m.
I
A female was cited and re-leased for being a minor inpossession of alcohol near theintersection of Lane A andCampus Drive at 12:45 a.m.
I
A bike wheel was vandalizedon a bike parked outside of Griffin House between 11p.m. the previous night and8:45 a.m.
I
A male was transported to theSan Jose Main Jail andbooked for being publicly in-toxicated at 8 p.m. nearGalvez Field.
I
A male was cited and releasedfor being a minor in posses-sion of alcohol at 11:20 p.m. onMayfield Drive.
I
A male was cited and releasedfor being a minor in posses-sion of alcohol at 11:50 p.m. onMayfield Drive.
SUNDAY, MAY 20
I
An iPhone was stolen fromLantana between 8:45 p.m.and 9:45 p.m.
MONDAY, MAY 21
I
A bike was stolen from out-side of Haus Mitteleuropa be-tween 8 p.m. on May 19 and 10a.m. on May 21.
2
N
Friday, May 25, 2012
 The Stanford Daily
POLICE BLOTTER
unconventional picks. In a Uni-versity press release, Applebaumsaid his selections were inspiredby the opening of the Bing Con-cert Hall, which is set to open itsdoors in January. Applebaumsaid he hopes the texts will in-spire students “to ask broaderquestions about where art ismade, what art is important andwho should decide.“In selecting these ‘texts,’ Pro-fessor Applebaum hopes the di-versity of formats encourages stu-dents to think about how ideas areexpressed differently by the writ-ten word, in filmic presentation,through music, or by using con-temporary social media,” saidJulie Lythcott-Haims ’89, dean of Freshman and UndergraduateAdvising, in the University pressrelease. Lythcott-Haims pio-neered the Three Books program,now in its ninth year.This will be the first year thatnon-printed texts have been se-lected. Past picks have includedJunot Diaz’s “The Brief WondrousLife of Oscar Wao” in 2008, Mal-colm Gladwell’s “Outliers” in 2009and Geraldine Brooks’ “March” in2011.The authors of the three textswill participate in a panel discus-sion at the conclusion of New Stu-dent Orientation. This year’s dis-cussion, moderated by Apple-baum, will take place on Sept. 23in Memorial Auditorium. A livetelecast of the event in Pigott The-ater will be open to the broaderStanford community.
 — Kurt Chirbas
BRIEF
Continued from front page
Letters to Michelle
 ALISA ROYER/The Stanford Daily
Stanford Says No to War and Occupy Stanford sponsored a letter writing party Thursday evening in the Haas Center. Attendees were encouragedto write letters to First Lady Michelle Obama to urge her to tell her husband not to pursue military action against Iran.
to a Housing representative whowas likely referring to the case of Azia Kim, who lived in Stanfordhousing for nearly a year from2006 to 2007, despite never beingan enrolled student.Valdez claims he was on cam-pus to work on a start-up with sev-eral other Stanford students,which he continues to do from anoff-campus apartment.On March 20, five weeks afterthe initial incident was reported toUniversity officials, Stanford is-sued a stay-away letter to Valdez,according to Universityspokesperson Lisa Lapin.At the time initial concernswere voiced, Valdez received mul-tiple warnings to leave the campus,including a written stay-away let-ter issued to him March 20.”Valdez denied receiving such aletter, but did say that Universityadministrators had warned himnot to come within 50 feet of stu-dent residences. His Twitter feedshows photos taken from the Stan-ford campus on March 30 andApril 16.On May 4, more than a monthafter the stay-away letter was is-sued, the Department of PublicSafety (SUDPS) was called toFloMo one of the residencesValdez is known to have stayed in— to accompany University staff in confronting Valdez. After arriv-ing at the dorm room where hewas staying, University staff es-corted Valdez off the premises, ac-cording to an SUDPS report.On May 9, Fran’Cee Brown-McClure, student affairs officer forResidential Education, sent anemail to all RAs with a picture of Valdez, identifying him as an “ille-gal lodger” and notifying RAsthat, “we have reason to believethat [Valdez’s] presence could be athreat to other Stanford students.”The notice informed students tocontact SUDPS deputies if theysee Valdez on campus.The University has not pressedcharges against Valdez; however,failure to comply with a stay-awayletter could result in trespassingcharges, a criminal misdemeanor.“The warnings are over,” Lapinsaid. “If he comes on campusagain, he will be subject to arrest.”Lapin added that administra-tors were unable to confirm thatValdez committed any crime, butdecided to ban him from campusgiven student concern.“While the University has notbeen able to verify any criminalconduct to date, Stanford takesany concerns voiced by studentsseriously,” Lapin said.
Contact Brendan O’Byrne at bobyrne@stanford.edu and Kurt Chirbas at kchirbas@stanford.edu
LODGER
Continued from front page
VisitStanfordDaily.com/supportTheDailytoday
Help
 The Stanford Daily
Grow
Europe is going through precisely thetensions I’ve tried to identify here.
— DANI RODRIK,Harvard professor 
 
 The Stanford Daily
Friday, May 25, 2012
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