Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Great Egret

Great Egret

Ratings: (0)|Views: 2|Likes:

More info:

Published by: Connecticut Wildlife Publication Library on May 27, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
download as PDF or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/11/2014

pdf

 
W
ILDLIFE IN
C
ONNECTICUT
CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
q
WILDLIFE DIVISION
ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES SERIES
GREAT EGRET
 Ardea albus
Identification:
The great egret is a large member ofthe heron family, with long legs, white plumage, and aslender body. Adults have black legs and feet. Duringthe breeding season, the normally yellow bill mayappear orange and long feather plumes (aigrettes)extend from the back to beyond the tail. Immatureegrets and non-breeding adults have no plumes andthe color of their bills and legs is duller. The wings ofthe great egret are proportionately longer and broaderthan most other white herons. In flight, the great egretholds its neck in a more open S-shape than do otherwhite herons. The species utters a loud, low-pitched,hoarse croak. The sexes are similar in appearance butmales are slightly larger.
Range:
The great egret occurs from Maine andsouthern Canada west to the Great Lakes, south toTexas, the Gulf Coast states, Florida, and along theAtlantic Coast.
Reproduction:
The great egret usually nests incolonies with other heron species in wooded swampsand wetlands. Nests are typically built 20 to 40 feetabove ground in medium-sized trees. Occasionally theyare built in bushes or cattails, 1 to 4 feet above water.The nest is a large, flat platform, constructed of sticksand twigs and usually lined with small pieces of plantmaterial. Nest building is normally started by the male,who then brings materials to the female for her to finishbuilding the nest.The breeding season begins in mid-April but varies withyearly weather patterns. The single clutch of 4 to 5 oval,smooth, greenish-blue eggs is incubated for 23 to 24days. When the nestlings hatch, they are semi-altricial(mostly helpless), with long, white down that has fine,silky tips. The nestlings have pink bills that eventuallyturn yellow. Both adults tend the young. After about 3
Habitat:
Freshwater and saltwater marshes, streams,ponds, lakes, and mud flats. In Connecticut, typicallynest on uninhabited offshore islands in Long IslandSound.
 Weight:
32-40 ounces.
Length:
38 inches.
 Wingspan:
55 inches.
Life Expectancy:
Some banded birds have livedmore than 22 years.
Food:
Fishes, frogs, salamanders, snakes, crayfish,mice, aquatic insects, crickets, grasshoppers, and avariety of other insects.
Status:
State threatened.
T   H  R  E  A  T   E  N  E  D  

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->