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Times Leader 05-27-2012

Times Leader 05-27-2012

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Published by The Times Leader
The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 05-27
The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 05-27

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T
he
T
imes
L
eader
C M Y K
WILKES-BARRE, PA SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 $1.50
timesleader.com
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$
20
VOUCHERFOR ONLY
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Dear Abby: How to ensure a lasting marriage?
ETC.,3F
Celtics85,76ers75
RajonRondo
had18points,10 assists and10rebounds and the BostonCeltics beat the Philadel-phia 76ers 85-75 in Game 7on Saturday night to ad-vance to the Eastern Con-ference finals.The Celtics will open thethird round of the NBAplayoffs in Miami againstthe Heat on Monday night.Rondo scored nine straightBoston points after PaulPierce fouled out with 4:16left in the game, helpingthe Celtics turn a three-point edge into a double-digit lead.
1C
SPORTSSHOWCASE
IL BASEBALL
BISONS8SWBYANKS7
NATIONAL LEAGUE
PHILLIES4CARDINALS0METS9PADRES0
AMERICAN LEAGUE
YANKEES9A’S2
6
09815 10077
Benoit Jeannet and Stéphanie LeBris are too young to remember World War II. But both live in Nor-mandy, France where the memoriesand effects of that war still linger.Each of them has chosen to honorthe memory of a Luzerne County sol-dier who lost his life during the in- vasion which liberated France. The
In Normandy, where Europe’s liberation began,the French do not forget Luzerne County’s fallen 
Remembrance
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
ToniGrisetoholdsabookwithaphotographofheruncleReginaldClarkJr.,whodiedinthe1944liberationofEuropeduringWorldWarII.
‘Flowers of Memory’ bloom in France
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Louis‘Booty’BeltramirecallsthesadnessoflearningthathisbrotherMichaelwasmissinginaction.
BySUSANDENNEY 
Times Leader Correspondent
SeeMEMORY,Page16A
 WILKES-BARRE The city must reimburse nearly $30,000 itreceived from the state for roadprojects and equipment after anaudit determined it failed to seekbids for the pur-chases. The audit,performed by the state Audi-torGeneral’sOf-fice, disallowed$15,082 in ex-penses for coldpatch after re-cords indicatedthe purchasemay have been“piecemealed”to evade bid-ding regula-tions.It also disal-lowed a $14,894purchaseofasphaltbecauseitwasnotbidout. ThecitywasamongsixLuzerneCountymunicipalitiestheauditorgeneral faulted for failing to seekbidsorquotesonitemspurchased
W-B owes$30,000for bidviolations
Audit: City owes cash to statedue to failure to seek bids forroad projects and equipment.
SeeVIOLATIONS,Page14A
LeightonFrati
ByTERRIEMORGAN-BESECKER 
tmorgan@timesleader.com
INSIDE
ANEWS:
Local 3ANation & World 4AObituaries 9A,10A
BPEOPLE:
1BBirthdays 8B
CSPORTS:
1COutdoors14C
DBUSINESS:
1D
EVIEWS:
1EEditorials 3E
FETC.:
1FPuzzles 2FBooks 5F
GCLASSIFIED:
1G
 WEATHER
NathanielWrenPartlysunny,rain.High85,low60.
Details, Page16C
Mark Linker said he was wrongly lodged intheLuzerneCountyprisonovernightlastweekbecausethecountyclerkofcourtsofficedidn’tfile paperwork showing a judge lifted an out-standing warrant against him.Linker said he had to leave his 17-year-oldsonunattendedduringtheprisonstayandpay a $100 prison booking fee. He also lost his six- year construction job because he missed workand his boss wasn’t pleased with the prison explanation.He said he was helping afriend with a flat tire in Jen-kins Township when policeasked for his identificationand found the warrant in thecomputer system.Linker, 45, said he unsuc-cessfully tried to convince police he was not wanted for failure to appear at an arraignmentfor drunken driving and a related charge.“I’m a single father raising a17-year-old son,
DON CAREY/TIMES LEADER PHOTO
MarkLinkerofWilkes-BarreholdsuptheLu-zerneCoun-tyCorrec-tionalFacil-ityinmatehandbookhereceivedwhenhewaslodgedover-nightlastweekbe-causeofwhathesayswasanerror.
Was local man jailed in error?
Mark Linker says the county made aclerical mistake, and he paid for it.
ByJENNIFERLEARN-ANDES 
 jandes@timesleader.com
Dennis
SeeJAILED,Page7A
Six Luzerne County commu-nities that use state funds to pay for equipment and road work violated bidding regulations by failing to obtain quotes or bidsfor some of their expenditures,according to audits by stateAuditor General’s Office. The audits, released in Janu-ary, disallowed a combined totalof $111,801in expenditures themunicipalities paid from money they received through the liquidfuels tax fund administered by the state Department of Trans-portation. The fund provides money forcertain types of road work and
6 area townsallegedly fail to get quotes
ByTERRIEMORGAN-BESECKER 
tmorgan@timesleader.com
SeeQUOTES,Page14A
 
K
PAGE 2A SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Atherholt,AllanGiblin-Butts,CorneliaGola,JamesGunton,AnnMarieHaydt,NancyKnick,StanleySr.Lapchon,TheodoreMichaels,TheresaO’Malia,JohnPachick,DanielSr.Phillips,RosemarieSchwartz,JosephSolan,AndrewSoricelli,JuneThompson,Bertha
OBITUARIES
Page 9A, 10A
PRASHANTSHITUT
President & CEO(570) 970-7158
pshitut@timesleader.com
JOEBUTKIEWICZ
VP/Executive Editor(570) 829-7249
 jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com
DENISESELLERS
VP/Chief Revenue Officer(570) 970-7203
dsellers@timesleader.com
ALLISONUHRIN
VP/Chief Financial Officer(570) 970-7154
auhrin@timesleader.com
LISADARIS
VP/HRandAdministration(570) 829-7113
ldaris@timesleader.com
MICHAELPRAZMA
VP/Circulation(570) 970-7202
mprazma@timesleader.com
An company
DETAILS
timesleader.com
Newsroom
829-7242jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com
Circulation
 Jim McCabe – 829-5000jmccabe@timesleader.com
Delivery Monday–Sunday $3.60 per weekMailed Subscriptions Monday–Sunday$4.45 per week in PA$4.85 per week outside PAPublished daily by:Impressions Media15 N. Main St.Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711Periodicals postage paid atWilkes-Barre, PA and additional mailing officesPostmaster: Send address changesto Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
+(ISSN No. 0896-4084)USPS 499-710
Issue No. 2012-148
DailyNumber,Midday
Sunday: 2-7-5Monday: 8-8-3Tuesday:1-1-6Wednesday:1-4-9Thursday: 6-6-4Friday: 4-6-9Saturday: 3-6-0
BigFour,Midday
Sunday: 6-6-0-4Monday:1-3-9-8Tuesday: 5-7-4-3Wednesday: 7-8-9-2Thursday: 6-9-6-3Friday: 8-4-9-5Saturday: 3-8-8-4
Quinto,Midday
Sunday: 6-2-1-8-2Monday: 4-3-8-4-4Tuesday: 7-8-9-6-4Wednesday: 5-3-0-3-0Thursday: 4-2-5-7-2Friday: 6-6-9-9-7Saturday: 8-8-8-0-8
TreasureHunt
Sunday: 04-23-26-27-29Monday: 01-04-05-17-20Tuesday: 09-11-16-20-23Wednesday:10-15-21-22-29Thursday: 03-08-15-18-30Friday: 01-10-21-23-26Saturday: 05-08-12-14-21
DailyNumber,7p.m.
Sunday: 3-5-8Monday: 7-0-3Tuesday: 4-5-0Wednesday: 2-4-0Thursday: 5-9-2Friday: 0-3-7Saturday: 3-9-3
BigFour,7p.m.
Sunday: 9-1-4-2Monday: 3-7-6-4Tuesday: 9-5-0-3Wednesday: 9-8-2-5Thursday: 0-8-8-5Friday: 5-2-9-0Saturday: 7-5-3-2
Quinto,7p.m.
Sunday: 0-8-7-5-1Monday: 8-5-0-7-1Tuesday:1-8-0-4-1Wednesday: 4-3-3-3-7Thursday: 0-6-2-7-6Friday: 3-4-9-0-7Saturday: 0-9-9-3-6 (9-2-5-0-5,double draw)
Cash5
Sunday: 05-15-19-26-40Monday:11-26-31-33-43Tuesday:13-29-35-39-42Wednesday:10-1-16-18-37Thursday: 01-04-09-22-36Friday: 05-13-15-28-40Saturday: 02-29-37-38-41
Match6Lotto
Monday:13-16-19-28-45-46Thursday:14-17-18-27-31-48
Powerball
Wednesday: 04-07-26-53-59powerball: 32Saturday:13-14-41-49-59powerball:14
MegaMillions
Tuesday:10-14-35-43-52Megaball:16Megaplier: 02Friday: 09-15-21-40-54Megaball:11Megaplier: 04
 WEEKLY LOTTERY SUMMARY 
Once again,
The Guide will publish a masterlist telling you where and when you can find abazaar throughout the area this summer,from now through early September. This willbe the most comprehensive guide we cancompile to the annual festivals planned bychurches, fire companies and civic organiza-tions. If you’d like your event included in thisclip-and-save edition, please email the details,with a contact phone number, to Sara Po-korny at spokorny@timesleader.com no laterthan Tuesday May 29.
PLANNINGYOURSUMMERBAZAAR? ATIMETOHONORWARVETERANS
DON CAREY PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
L
en Luba holds his gran-daughter Cayla Luba,4, as they listen to aprayer at the LuzerneCounty Vietnam VeteransMemorial CommitteeGathering of Friends atthe Vietnam VeteransMemorial on the southlawn of the Luzerne Coun-ty Courthouse Saturday.At right, Kathy Dobash ofHazleton listens to aprayer during the gather-ing.
THEIRLASTRECITALSATWYOMINGSEMINARY 
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
elsey Dolhon, left, sitswith her cello andlistens to I-An Lin, farright, play Sonata No. 5‘Spring’ in F Major byBeethoven on the violinduring Friday’s WyomingSeminary Farewell Recitalheld at The Great Hall inKingston. The WyomingSeminary Upper SchoolFine and Performing ArtsDepartment presents theevent every year. The con-cert features student-musicians performingclassical and vocal music.The performance is thefinal event of the 2011-12Wyoming Seminary Per-forming Arts Series.
WILKES-BARRE
– Mary Scott of Willow Street toldpolice Friday that someoneopened a credit card accountusing her address and socialsecurity number, according topolice.
WILKES-BARRE
– JeanineLotito of Greenbriar Circle, Tobyhanna, reported Saturday a bank card and check/debitcard were stolen from her vehicle while it was parked inthe garage attached to Wilkes-Barre General Hospital onNorth River Street.
HAZLETON
– Wilson Rosa-rio said his Cedar Street resi-dence was burglarized andthat two televisions, $300cash and a teacup Chihuahua were removed.Hazleton police said they are investigating and askanyone with information tocontact the police depart-ment.
FRANKLIN TWP.
– WilliamYarmel of Orangeville saidsomeone removed a Delcoheavy duty battery from hisrecreational vehicle at theHickory Grove Campgroundon Cummings Road sometimebetween Sunday, May 20 andFriday, according to statepolice.
HAZLETON
– Police Sat-urday reported two people were injured in a two-carcollision at the intersection of state Route 924 and OldCranberry Road.A 2004 Honda Civic drivenby Santa Guerrero De Colonof West Hazleton was trav-eling north on the roadway around 4:30 p.m. and turnedleft into the path of a south-bound 1989 Chevrolet Cava-lier operated by Robert Roth-ermel of Pottsville.De Colon and a passengerin Rothermel’s car were takento Hazleton General Hospitalfor treatment of their injuries.
HAZLETON
- One person was injured in a two-vehiclecollision Saturday night atthe intersection of Cranberry Avenue and Poplar Street,police said. The unidentified injuredperson was taken by ambu-lance to Hazleton GeneralHospital.She was a passenger in a1996 Mercury Villager drivenby Virginia Ortiz of NorthLaurel Street, Hazleton.Police said the Villager wastraveling west on Cranberry Avenue when it collided witha 2007 Jeep Cherokee drivenby William Ebert of WestHazleton that was traveling north on Poplar Street.
POLICE BLOTTER
NESQUEHONING — Author-ities in eastern Pennsylvania areinvestigatingthedeathsofamanand woman in their home.Police said the bodies of 33- year-old Christopher Lewis and31-year-old Dana Lewis werefound in the Nesquehoning resi-dence on Saturday.CarbonCountyCoronerBruceNelesnik said he pronounced thetwo dead at 10:38 a.m. Saturday.He said post-mortem examin-ations would be scheduled.Police said state troopers andmajorcaseteamswereinvestigat-ing. Officials have not said whatthe cause of death may havebeen.
Police investigateeastern Pa. deaths
The Associated Press
CHESTER. — When Harrah’sChester Casino & Racetrackopened its doors in this strug-glingcityinJanuary2007,itwasthestate’sthirdcasino,anovelty that pulled in Philadelphia-areagamblers thrilled not to have todrive to Atlantic City.Five years later, Pennsylvaniahas11casinos, four in the Phila-delphia area. Harrah’s casino inChester, a long-downtroddencity in the southern suburbs, al-soisclosertocompetitioninDe-laware and Maryland.“We’ve certainly felt the pres-sures,” said Ron Baumann, theChester casino’s general manag-er and a veteran of Atlantic City, where casinos have seen theirrevenues plummet amid height-ened competition from Pennsyl- vania. “The Atlantic City lessonis certainly one that we all needto learn. ... You just always, al- ways have to be creating a com-petitive advantage.” Tofightback,thecasinoistry-ingtorebranditselfandincreasethe quality of its offerings.Earlier this month, it an-nounced it was rebranding itself Harrah’s Philadelphia to givecustomersabetterideaofwhereit is. It is upgrading its restau-rants and starting to hold con-certs on its new patio and on itsracetrack, efforts geared towardbecoming a “night out” destina-tion for customers farther away. While Harrah’s business re-mainsabovebothitsownprojec-tionsandthoseofthePennsylva-nia Gaming Control Board, theslotslosseshavethecasinooper-ators scrambling.“Ourplanscallforgrowththis year,” said Baumann, who is fo-cusedongettingmoreoftheesti-mated8.5milliongamingadults within a 60-mile radius aroundthecasino.“Arewecontentwith where we’re at? No.”
Chester casino feels pressure in crowded Pennsylvania market
ByPATRICKWALTERS 
 Associated Press
 
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 PAGE 3A
L
OCAL
timesleader.com
 WILKES-BARRE
Suspect returning to area 
G
eorge Lee Barnes will likely betransported back to the area some-time this week from Philadelphia, where he was arrest-ed Friday night on a warrant in a fatalshooting in Ed- wardsville on Ma16, said LuzerneCounty DistrictAttorney StefanieSalavantis.Barnes, 22, alleg-edly shot and killed Daron Rhashawn Trollinger, 26, at the Eagle Ridgeapartments during a drug deal, accord-ing to arrest papers. Barnes was wounded and was discharged fromGeisinger Wyoming Valley MedicalCenter, Plains Township, the day afterthe shooting around the same timeinvestigators recovered a .22-caliberrevolver from his Main Street apart-ment in Edwardsville. He was not asuspect at the time of his release. A warrant for his arrest was issued onMay 22.Members of the state police fugitivetask force, the U.S. Marshals Serviceand Philadelphia police arrestedBarnes, who was armed with a gun,around 9 p.m. Friday, police said. Hefaces a firearm’s charge in Philadel-phia, police said.
PLYMOUTH TWP.
Cops: Driver leaves scene
 The driver of a pickup truck fled thescene after a two-vehicle accident at8:55 p.m. Friday, according to statepolice.State police said Brittany Krapf,19,of Mountain Top was driving west onMizdail Road in a Pontiac Aztek and was struck by the oncoming pickuptruck, which lost control while nego-tiating a left turn at high speed.State police said both vehicles stop-ped, but the driver of the pickup fledafter he was confronted by 31-year-oldJason Rece, a passenger in the Pon-tiac. Anthony Cook, 25, of Alden, oneof three passengers in the Pontiac, wasinjured in the crash, state police said. The pickup truck was described as adark blue Ford F-150, possibly with adesign on the side, state police said. The driver was described as an older white male with white hair, approxi-mately 6 feet tall, weighing175pounds and wearing a straw cowboy hat, state police said.Anyone with information about theaccident or the driver of the pickup isasked to contact state police at Wyom-ing at 697-2000.
 WHITE HAVEN
Meeting to discuss traffic
A public meeting to discuss resi-dents’ concerns about heavy-trucktraffic through White Haven will beheld at 6 p.m. Wednesday in the St.Patrick church parish hall, 506 ElmiraSt.State Rep. Tarah Toohil, R-Butler Township, members of her staff, mem-bers of borough council and repre-sentatives from PennDOT will attend.
PITTSTON
NIXLE service is free
Police are encouraging residents tosign up for the community informa-tion service NIXLE. The free service delivers neigh-borhood-levelpublic safety threats andcommunity event notifications by the web, email and cell phone.Residents can register at www.Nix-le.com or e-mail their information tosgt.knowles@yahoo.com, who willhandle the registration.A link to NIXLE can also be foundon the Pittston City web page, www.pittstoncity.org.
 WASHINGTON, D.C.
Internships are offered
U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Hazleton,announced his office is accepting applications for student internships inhis Washington, D.C., and Northeast-ern Pennsylvania district offices forthe fall semester.Applicants must be at least18 yearsold. The start and end dates of theinternships depend on the student.Schedules are also determined basedon an intern’s availability. To apply, an interested studentshould send a resume and a coverletter by email to Barletta’s office atPA11Internships@gmail.com.Applications are due June15.
N E W S I N B R I E F
Barnes
A Luzerne County back-tax sale isscheduled for June11, but this one is un-usual because it only covers property ownedbyHazleton-arearesidentJimLa-gana and his company.Laganasaidhe’sconfidentthesalewillbecalledoffbecausehe’sfinalizingarefi-nancingplanthatwillyieldcashtocoverall overdue taxes.JudgeshadagreedtoremoveLagana’spropertiesfrompastsales,includingoneon April12, based on Lagana’s promisesto repay the debt.Northeast Revenue Service LLC, thecounty’staxclaimoperator,arguedaspe-cial sale should be held if Lagana didn’tpay because the next first-stage auction won’tbehelduntilthefall,saidcompany representative John Rodgers. Thecourtagreedandorderedaspecialsale on May 14. Another extension wasgranteduntilJune11,butthecourtordersaidinboldprintthat“nofurthercontin-uances will be granted.” ThefollowingLaganaproperties,allinHazleTownship,couldbeupforauction:the Holly Lynn Mobile Home Park, twocorporate center buildings and threecommercialofficeandretailbuildingsonthe Airport Beltway – the Laurel Profes-sional Center, the Beltway CommonsandtheFranklinCorporateCenter,coun-ty records show.Lagana owes more than $289,200 intaxes on these and other properties for2009 through 2011, county tax recordsshow.Lagana said he has been working on arefinancing plan for months and tenta-tively plans to close on an agreement Wednesday.Hesaidhistenantsshouldn’tbe concerned because the restructuring is definite.He blamed his tax difficulties on thecountywidereassessment,sayinghistaxbillsdoubledonsomeproperties.Laganasaidhehadtohireappraiserstoprovetheproperties were over-assessed and waitforassessmentchallengestoberesolved.Rodgers said he wants the propertiesauctioned June11if the taxes aren’t paidsotheymayadvancetothecounty’sfree-and-clear sale in August, which is forproperties that don’t sell at initial sales.Rodgers said he will continue seeking specialsalesforpropertiesthatcarrytaxbills over $100,000.“Someofthesepropertieskeepgetting continuances. The taxing bodies needthe money,” Rodgers said.Properties are supposed to be auc-tioned if taxes have gone unpaid for two years. To get out of a sale, property own-ers must pay taxes owed, file for bank-ruptcyorconvinceajudgetograntmoretime.
One-owner back-tax sale planned
Jim Lagana says he expects to paythe bill and head off the sale.
ByJENNIFERLEARN-ANDES 
 jandes@timesleader.com
DALLASTWP.Areanursesare celebrating their proud his-tory at Misericordia Universi-ty’s Pauly Friedman Gallery ata special retrospective exhibittitled,“TheHistoryandImpactof Nursing Education in Lu-zerne County,1887-2012.” Through displays, memora-bilia, artifacts and narratives,the exhibittraces theevolutionandlegacy onursing andnursing edu-cation in Lu-zerne County and how it in-tertwines with the his-torical devel-opmentofthecounty. The dis-play high-lights memo-rablemomentsinthehistoryof local nursing education andnursingpractice,anditfeaturesuniforms, nursing pins, pic-tures,classyearbooks,andrareand precious artifacts. High-lights include a display on theCadetNurseCorps,andspecialexhibitsthatdetailtherelation-ship of nursing with the localcoal mining industry, nursing practice past and present, andthe impact of local nursing onthe area’s disaster recovery inthe aftermath of the AgnesFlood.“Somuchofthelocalhistory of nursing was being lost or ig-nored,” said Donna Snelson,adjunct professor at Misericor-dia. “We started the Center forNursing History in 2005 withmoney from a state grant, andMisericordia was graciousenough to give us space tohouse the permanent exhibit.”Snelson said nursing educa-tion started with one-year “di-ploma programs,” which weregenerally housed and fundedby local hospitals, but much of the history of these early pro-gramswasstoredawayinbase-ments of former students andinstructors.“Wilkes-Barre General Hos-pital was actually one of thefirstdozenNightingaleschoolsin the country,” said Snelson.On Wednesday, about 50alumni of the former PittstonHospital School of Nursincame out to the exhibit as part
Exhibitfocuseson nursetraining
Misericordia Universityoffers a look at 125 years ofeducational history.
BySTEVENFONDO
Times Leader Correspondent
“So muchof the localhistory ofnursingwas beinglost or ig-nored.”
Donna Snelson
Misericordiaadjunctprofessor
See NURSING, Page 7A
It’shardtotellifthePennsyl- vania Fish and Boat Commis-sion’s Fish for Free Days hasrecruited new anglers into li-cense buyers.After all, when a one-day re-prieve on the license require-ment is granted, how does onedifferentiate between veteranangler and first-time novice? WaltDietz,whoservesastheoutreachandeducationcoordi-nator for the PFBC’s NortheastRegion, said even if the pro-gram isn’t recruiting new an-glers as hoped, it’s still not afailure.“Ifitdoesn’tworkandpeoplecome away with a free day of fishing, what’s the harm?”Dietzsaid.“It’shardtotabulateif it’s working or not, but it’s anenticement.Offerpeopleanop-portunity to try it out beforethey decide to buy a license.” The PFBC has been offering Fish for Free Days since 1984.Back then a single day, Sept.22, was designated to allowpeople to fish without needing a license.Later, the PFBC offered FishFor Free Days as the back-to-back Saturday and Sunday of the same weekend. That wasgenerally scheduled for the weekendinearlyJuneaspartof National Fishing & Boating  Week. The move was risky becauseacoupledaysofraincouldputadamperontheentireweekend.In1996,thecommissiondecid-ed to move one of the Fish ForFree Days from the spring tothefall.Theagencyalsoselect-ed the fourth Saturday in Sep-tember – National Hunting &
Fish for Free Days still has state’s backing
The success of the programis uncertain, but no one isready to end it just yet.
ByTOMVENESK
tvenesky@timesleader.com
WALT DIETZ/PENNSYLVANIA FISH AND BOAT COMMISSION
Waterways Conservation Officer John Cummings teaches ayoung angler how to cast during last summer’s Fish for FreeDay at Frances Slocum State Park.
See FREE, Page 6A
Fish for Free Days allow anyone(resident or non-resident) tolegally fish with no fishing li-cense required to fish on allPennsylvania’s waterways onthe designated days. All otherfishing regulations still apply.Two dates are typically chosen –May 28 and Sept. 3.
For more information
on theFish for Free Days and the Fam-ily Fishing Program, visitwww.fish.state.pa.us/fish_funda-mentals.htm.
H O W I T W O R K S
 WILKES-BARRE – How can an organi-zation with a 10-building campus in theheart of downtown Wilkes-Barre that hasexisted since the Civil War and servesmore than 4,000 clients a year escape thepublic’s attention?Children’s Service Center, a behavioralhealthorganizationthathasservedWyom-ing Valley children and their families for150 years, is wondering exactly that. In itssesquicentennial year, it is attempting tobuild awareness of the services the centeroffers among community and businessleaders,serviceprovidersandthepublicatlarge.“Ourbiggestchallengeoverthepast150 years and today is distancing ourselvesfrom the other programs in our area thathave ‘children’ in the title,” CSC Directorof Development Liz Hubbard said.“…We’re trying to just get the word outabout who we are.”Chief Executive Officer Michael Hop-kins said the organization is seeking “anawareness of what we do; who we serve; who we help; if you have a need, how wemaybeabletohelpyoumeetthatneed;therecognition that we’ve been a member of the community for a very long time andprovide a service that’s sorely needed.”Inanefforttobringgreaterawarenesstothe work it does, the center is rebranding itself,advertisingitsservicesandreachinout to community and business leadersthrough informational luncheons. It host-editsfourthsuchluncheononWednesday.So what, exactly, is Children’s ServiceCenter?It’s a lot of things, actually, according toHopkins.
Unique in state
He said unequivocally that no organiza-tion in the state provides the array of ser- vices for children and families that thenonprofit does. The bulk of the services the organiza-tion provides are outpatient services, in-cluding individual and group counseling,medication management and psychiatricservices, Hubbard said.It also runs youth group homes in Wilkes-BarreandNanticoke,providesther-
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Classroom therapist Margie Banks hugs a student at the end of the day at Children’s Service Center in Wilkes-Barre. The cen-ter is advertising its services and reaching out to community and business leaders through informational luncheons.
CSC rebranding itself 
Children’s agency seeks attention 
ByMATTHUGHES 
 mhughes@timesleader.com
See CHILDREN’S, Page 6A

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