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DAILY 05.29.12

DAILY 05.29.12

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Print edition of The Stanford Daily, published May 29, 2012.
Print edition of The Stanford Daily, published May 29, 2012.

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By ALICE PHILLIPS
DESK EDITOR
Former University President RichardLyman died of congestive heart failure Sun-day in Palo Alto. He served as the Universi-ty’s seventh president from September 1970until August 1980.Lyman was 88.At the end of Lyman’s 10-year presiden-cy, The Daily’s Editorial Board took stock of his legacy in an editorial titled “Sorry to seeLyman go.”“The University is now an undisputedmember of the select club of academicallysuperb institutions . . . What makes thisachievement even more significant is thatLyman cemented the university’s position asa world-class institution during a period of unrest — both financial and emotional,” theeditorial read.
Path to the presidency
Lyman attended Swarthmore Collegebefore earning his master’s and Ph.D. fromHarvard University. He also attended theLondon School of Economics on a Fulbrightscholarship and taught history at Washing-ton University in St. Louis before coming toStanford as a history professor in 1958.Before serving as University president,Lyman also served as the associate dean of the School of Humanities and Sciences andprovost. In 1988, he founded and served asdirector of the center that later became theFreeman Spogli Institute for InternationalStudies.The choice of Lyman to replace KennethPitzer as University president was one pointof consensus amid the otherwise turbulenttimes on campus in the late ’60s and early’70s.The Daily wrote shortly after Lymantook office that it was rare for alumni, facul-ty members, students and trustees to “agreeon anything, yet all these natural enemiesmanaged to agree” on Lyman.
Weathering the storm
Lyman, however, did not receive a warmwelcome to the University. During his firstconvocation address in September 1970,demonstrators employed the “give ‘em theaxe” cheer normally reserved for sportingevents against Cal.Lyman’s term as president represented atime of significant transition for the Univer-sity. He reflected in his memoir, “Stanford in
Index 
Features/3 Opinions/4 Sports/5 Classifieds/6
Recycle Me
SPORTS/5
HOPEFUL HOSTS
Baseball secures regional spotdespite series loss to Cal
FEATURES/3
 A TWINTHING
Tomorrow 
Mostly Sunny 
7451
Today 
Mostly Sunny 
6949
 An Independent Publication
 www.stanforddaily.com
 The Stanford Daily T
TUESDAY Volume 241
May 29, 2012Issue 69
NEWS BRIEFS
Former PresidentLyman dies at 88
STUDENT LIFE
Pro-Romney group rampsup campaign
By MATT BETTONVILLE
DESK EDITOR
Now that Republican presiden-tial candidate Mitt Romney is fo-cusing his campaign on the Novem-ber general election, Stanford’s Stu-dents for Romney, a chapter of thenational campaign organizationStudents for Mitt, is launching itson-campus organization.The group is presently in theprocess of electing its leadership forthe next school year, but eventuallyhopes to raise support for Rom-ney’s campaign by hosting debates,a phone-a-thon and events promot-ing political awareness.The group originally formed tosupport Romney’s campaign forthe Republican nomination forpresident, but was largely inactive.“We kind of knew throughoutthe primaries that he was going towin, so we were kind of waiting forthe bigger fight,” said ReaganThompson ’12, president of Stu-dents for Romney.The group held a launch eventFriday afternoon to gather interestboth for participants and leadershippositions during election seasonnext fall. According to Students forRomney Vice President ChipSchroeder ’12, about 30 people,mostly graduate students and up-perclassmen, attended.“Our goal for the group is to in-vite Stanford students to learnmore about Romney and considerpositions — especially economic— which are not often discussed atStanford,” Schroeder said in anemail to The Daily.Schroeder said support wasstrongest from students in theGraduate School of Business, butweaker among undergraduate stu-dents, perhaps due to the economicfocus of the group and the cam-paign.“There’s actually a pretty sub-stantial Republican, conservativeconstituency on campus,” Thomp-son said, citing the Stanford Con-servative Society, the Stanford Re-view and the Stanford Republicansas strong organizations. “It’s just amatter of mobilizing.”Thompson said that it is unlikelythat Students for Romney will hostany events this quarter since theyear is nearly over, but the grouphopes to have a strong presence fallquarter of next year. She added that
Please see
LYMAN
, page 2
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
ASSU groupreviews use of union space
By MATT BETTONVILLE
DESK EDITOR
Following a report commissioned earlierthis year, the ASSU assembled a working groupto review use of student union spaces. Thegroup has since launched several initiatives torepurpose spaces in Old Union and surround-ing buildings and has encouraged further use of union spaces.Programs such as Union Underground andthe Volunteer Student Organization (VSO)Office Space Pilot Program have resulted fromthe working group.To evaluate Stanford’s union spaces, the re-search group both looked at the history of unions at Stanford and examined peer institu-tions with strong student unions, particularlythe University of Maryland-College Park andits Stamp Student Union.According to former ASSU PresidentMichael Cruz ’12, the group focused on spacesin the “White Plaza complex,” the name as-signed to the area that includes Old Union,Tresidder Union, the Nitery and other build-
Stanford Daily File Photo
Former President Richard Lyman died Sunday.Lyman was University president during theprotest era at Stanford and led the Universityto become a world-renowned institution.
Please see
UNION
, page 2
By DAVID PEREZ
STAFF WRITER
It was a historic day for Stanford women’stennis at the NCAA Tennis Championships,as an all-Cardinal final in the singles draw wasfollowed by a doubles title just hours later.Sophomore Nicole Gibbs defeated juniorteammate Mallory Burdette for the individ-ual championship before the two joinedforces to take the doubles crown 6-2, 6-4.Gibbs became only the third Stanfordplayer to win both the singles and doubles ti-tles in the same year at the NCAA Champi-onships. Monday’s win at the Dan Magill Ten-nis Complex in Athens, Ga., made Gibbs the15th Stanford woman to win the collegiatesingles championship and the first sinceAmber Liu in 2004.Gibbs defeated Burdette, 2-6, 7-6 (5), 6-3in a mentally grueling match in which she wasonce a set and three games behind. Gibbscame back to force a second set tiebreak,where she fell behind 5-2 and once againfound herself on the brink of elimination.In the first set, Burdette was the more as-sertive player, as she came to net successfullyand took control of the match. Ahead 4-1 inthe second set, she looked poised to run awaywith the trophy. Burdette had not lost morethan three games in a set in the entire tourna-ment, and she appeared set on continuingthat dominant streak.“I had kind of resigned myself to losing tosomeone who was playing by far the best ten-nis in all of college tennis,” Gibbs said. “Atthat point, I was just trying anything possible
 ALISA ROYER/The Stanford Daily
Mallory Burdette (left) and Nicole Gibbs met in the finals of the NCAA singles draw, with Gibbs eventually coming out on top. However, the star duo managed to put emotions aside and teamed up to win the doubles title, making Stanford’s trip to Athens, Ga., an undeniable success.
CARDINAL CLEANS UP AT NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS
Please see
CHAMPS
, page 6
Race plays role in juvenilesentencing, study finds
By THE DAILY NEWS STAFF
A new study by Stanford psychologists re-vealed that if people picture a juvenile offenderas being black, they are more likely to be in favorof harsher sentences for all juvenile offenders.“These results highlight the fragility of pro-tections for juveniles when race is in play,” saidAneeta Rattan, lead author of the study, to theStanford Report.The study polled a nationally representativesample of 735 white Americans. The authorschose to use only white participants because thatdemographic is statistically overrepresented on juries, in the legal field and in the judiciary.The participants were asked to read about a14-year-old male, with 17 prior juvenile convic-tions, who brutally raped an elderly woman.Half of the participants were told the juvenilewas white; the other half were told he was black.This was the only difference.Participants who were given a black offend-er more strongly endorsed policies that send ju-veniles convicted of violent crimes to life inprison without parole, compared to respondentswho had in mind a white offender.“The fact that imagining a particular targetcould influence your perceptions of a policy thatwould affect an entire class of people, we think,is pretty important to know,” said Jennifer Eber-hardt, senior author of the study and associateprofessor of psychology.The Supreme Court has banned the deathpenalty for juveniles and ruled in 2010 that lifewithout parole for non-homicide crimes violatesthe Constitutional ban on cruel and unusualpunishment.The Supreme Court is currently considering
Please see
BRIEFS
, page 2Please see
ROMNEY 
, page 2
 
2
N
Tuesday, May 29, 2012
 The Stanford Daily
whether to impose further restric-tions on juvenile punishments.Eberhardt said the study was par-tially inspired by current cases be-fore the Supreme Court.“The statistics out there indicatethat there are racial disparities insentencing juveniles who have com-mitted severe crimes,” Eberhardtsaid. “That led us to wonder, to whatextent does race play a role in howpeople think about juvenile sta-tus?”
 — Billy Gallagher 
Researchers developnanotubes to reducebattery costs
By THE DAILY NEWS STAFF
Stanford researchers havefound that carbon nanotubes couldhelp replace platinum in future bat-teries, significantly reducing pro-duction costs.A carbon nanotube is a synthet-ic sheet made of pure carbon rolledup into tube shapes. According to areport on Nanotechnology Now’swebsite, these nanotubes can be upto 10,000 times thinner than ahuman hair.This technology could replaceplatinum as a catalyst in batteries,which is a major long-term goal indeveloping affordable future bat-tery chemistries, including the lithi-um-air battery, which can have up to10 times the energy density of cur-rent batteries.“Platinum is very expensive andthus impractical for large-scalecommercialization,” said HongjieDai, a chemistry professor and co-author of the study. “Developing alow-cost alternative has been amajor research goal for severaldecades.”Two properties allow carbonnanotubes to be useful in batteries:electrical conductivity and catalyticactivity. Previously, nanotubes hadnot performed well in batteries be-cause the catalytic property de-pends on impurities and holes in thenanotube structure and the electri-cal property depends on the integri-ty of the nanotube structure.However, a group of researchersled by postdoctoral fellow Yan-guang Li, working in conjunctionwith researchers at Vanderbilt Uni-versity, created a nanotube modelwith both properties. The modelconsists of multiple nanotubeswrapped concentrically around oneanother, with the top layer shred-ded to enhance catalytic activity.
 — Matt Bettonville
BRIEFS
Continued from front page
the group hopes to organize de-bates and panels with Stanford De-mocrats.“There was talk of attempting tobring Romney to campus,” Thomp-son said. “That’s definitely a higher-level dream.”Romney will be in the area cam-paigning and fundraising severaltimes throughout the year.In addition to supporting Rom-ney’s campaign, Thompson saidthat Students for Romney hopes toraise the level of general politicalconversation on campus.“We feel like there are a lot of students on campus who don’t real-ly think critically about their politi-cal position,” Thompson said. “Ourgoal is . . . raising the level of polit-ical dialogue on campus.”The group said that a high levelof political discussion on campuswill be an important factor in theupcoming election.“We’re really excited that thiselection likely is going to be close,”Thompson said. “We students aregoing to have a significant role . . .and we’re really excited aboutthat.”
Contact Matt Bettonville at mbet-tonville@stanford.edu.
ROMNEY 
Continued from front page
ings adjacent to White Plaza.“While [the White Plaza com-plex] does include most of the as-pects found in other student unions,it lacks certain aspects, such as astrong arts space as well as somemore kind of recreational activitiesfound in most student unions,” Cruzsaid, noting that the union has par-ticularly strong centers for ethnic,religious and gender groups.The unions were also found tobe particularly strong in having gen-eral-use areas for students.“We were as strong, if notstronger, than most other studentunions in terms of having reallygood study spaces or group meetingspaces,” Cruz said.In the student union study, 42percent of students said the firstthing they thought of when thinkingabout Old Union was “a place to dogroup work,” second only to “TheAxe and Palm” at 51 percent.To address the shortcomings of the union spaces, the working groupcreated or expedited several pro-grams. Union Underground, an ini-tiative to create an area for studentart and a “free store” in the base-ment of Old Union, was piloted lastspring and received confirmation tocontinue operations this year.“It was actually a really bigstruggle to get space at all,” said LizMatus ’14, one of the students whohelped start the Union Under-ground project.Matus said that the art aspect,addressing the need for student artspace, was what ultimately got theproject approved.The VSO Space Initiative wascreated this quarter as a pilot pro-gram to allocate three rooms in OldUnion and four in the Nitery as of-fice, work and storage space for stu-dents groups. The ASSU issued anapplication for any student group toapply for its own space.Former ASSU Vice PresidentStewart Macgregor-Dennis ’13said that if the pilot program is suc-cessful, the working group plans totry to continue the initiative andexpand it. One drawback, he said,was that since more groups appliedfor space than the initiative couldaccommodate, groups might haveto move in and out of spaces peri-odically.According to Cruz, the goal of the Student Space Initiative was“increasing student engagementwith Old Union and having stu-dents feel like they really have asense of ownership with the studentunions.” He said the idea resultedfrom observations that studentswho feel at home in Stanford’s stu-dent unions are generally those ac-tive in organizations housed there.“Student groups that didn’t havethat kind of connection haven’t feltas much of a connection to OldUnion as an institution,” Cruz said.“While a majority of students areinvolved in some group during theirtime at Stanford, we felt that [OldUnion engagement] was a majorlacking issue.”The ASSU manages unionspaces in conjunction with the Of-fice of the Vice Provost for StudentAffairs (VPSA). VPSA Director of Student Unions Jeanette Smith-Laws, who worked on the VSO Of-fice Space Pilot Program, did notrespond to a request for an inter-view.Cruz also said that the ASSUhas finished funding its executiveaction grants for the year. Thegrants are given to groups of stu-dents looking to enhance Stanfordstudent life in some way, and en-courage student recipients to inte-grate Old Union into their activities.
Contact Matt Bettonville at mbet-tonville@stanford.edu.
UNION
Continued from front page
Turmoil,” that Stanford rose from itsstatus as a regional institution in the1950s to a “nationally and interna-tionally prestigious university by thetime the ’70s were over.”However, this rise to promi-nence did not come without up-heaval on campus.In his first year as president,Lyman suspended Associate Eng-lish Professor H. Bruce Franklin forinciting violence among students oncampus. Lyman was criticized forthis action during a Faculty Senatemeeting, in which Nobel LaureateLinus Pauling accused Lyman of in-fringing upon Franklin’s academicfreedom and individual rights.In early 1971, students accusedLyman of “tossing crumbs to blackstudents” after a meeting with BlackStudent Union (BSU) leaders todiscuss demands of the group. Theco-chairman of BSU called Lyman“blatantly negative and hostile.BSU members had previouslytaken over the stage during a speechLyman delivered in Memorial Audi-torium in 1968.“We believe that the lack of re-sponse is indicative of either a shal-low interest in the questions whichaffect racial groups on this campus,or perhaps more accurately a gen-uine inability to deal with the ques-tions of racism,” ASSU leaderswrote in an May 14, 1971, op-edprinted in The Daily.Other on-campus protests dur-ing Lyman’s politically activetenure included protests againstCIA recruiting, ROTC training oncampus and conducting military re-search in campus labs. Students andfaculty participated in sit-ins andprotests that, in the case of the Enci-na Hall protest during Lyman’stime as University provost, shutdown University buildings. He de-clared as president in 1971 that oc-cupying a building was “not an ac-ceptable form of political actionwithin the University.”Lyman urged students and facul-ty to stay away from meetings andmarches in a Feb. 11, 1970, radio ad-dress on KZSU — one of the manyweekly addresses he gave on KZSU.He characterized the disruptions as“the frankly declared attempt to re-produce as much of the war as pos-sible on the Stanford Universitycampus.”These disruptions made theirway to Lyman’s personal residenceon El Escarpado Way. The Universi-ty installed a tripwire alarm system,a hot line to campus security, a firealarm wired directly to the campusfire station and additional exteriorlighting around the house to protectit from protestors while Lyman wasstill provost.During one incident that tookplace the evening Lyman was host-ing a reception for the dean of theSchool of Humanities and Sciences,protestors threw rocks into Lyman’supstairs windows and launched asoda bottle filled with red paint intothe kitchen.Lyman’s time as president alsosaw student uproar over more cam-pus-central issues.In 1972, Lyman’s recommenda-tion that Stanford replace its “Indi-an” mascot was so unpopular thatalumni withheld donations inprotest, despite the student senate’ssupport for the mascot change at thetime.That particular point of discon-tent was not enough to keep Lymanfrom raising $300 million in the 1972Campaign for Stanford. At the time,it was the largest-ever fundraisingeffort by an institute of higher edu-cation.
Beyond Stanford
Lyman was unanimously electedto serve as president of the Rocke-feller Foundation upon leavingStanford in 1980, 10 years after hewas named to the post, living out hisown declaration in 1970 that a uni-versity president ought to only serve10 years.“Ideally a university presidentshould serve long enough to accom-plish something, and not longenough to make people think of hisaccomplishments wholly in the pasttense,” Lyman told The Daily in Oc-tober 1970, less than a month afterhe assumed the presidency.Lyman also served on the Na-tional Council on the Humanitiesfrom 1976 to 1982 and as vice chair-man of the council for two of thoseyears.The Stanford Alumni Associa-tion established the Richard W.Lyman Award for Faculty Service in1983. The award gives faculty $1,500earmarked for books and materialsin the faculty member’s field of in-terest to given to Stanford libraries.In 2002, the National Humani-ties Center inaugurated the RichardW. Lyman Award. The award, givento five people each year from 2002until 2006, included a $500,000 grantfrom the Rockefeller Foundationand $25,000 prize in recognition of academics who developed a synthe-sis between knowledge in the hu-manities and technological innova-tion.Lyman is survived by his wife,Jing (Palo Alto), daughters Jennifer(Washington, D.C.) and the Rev.Holly Antolini (Cambridge, Mass.),sons Christopher (Searsmont,Maine) and Timothy (Hartford,Conn.) and four grandchildren.The family has requested that, inthe place of flowers, memorial dona-tions be made out to the AmericanFriends Service Committee or theMichelle R. Clayman Institute forGender Research at Stanford.
Kurt Chirbas and Josee Smith con- tributed to this report.
Contact Alice Phillips at alicep1@stanford.edu.
LYMAN
Continued from front page
 
By RAYMOND LOUNG
T
he transition from highschool to college can behard for incomingfreshmen, especiallywith separation fromparents and siblings leading tohomesickness. For twins whohave often spent the entirety of their lives together this dis-tance can seem even further. Butwhat if your twin weren’t so faraway? What if you lived on thesame college campus, or maybe afew doors down the same hall, oreven in the same room?For many twins at Stanford,this situation is the reality. TheUniversity is home to many sets of twins and even triplets.While rumor has it that havingyour twin gain acceptance intoStanford increases your chances,Sonya Smith ’95, associate direc-tor of Undergraduate Admis-sions, set the record straight thatbeing a multiple does not provideany sort of advantage over a non-multiple in gaining admission toStanford. Nor does being a multi-ple increase all multiples’ chancesof getting into Stanford.“While we are sensitive totwins, triplets [and] multiples ap-plying, we treat them just thesame as any other applicant,” shesaid. “That is, our admission re-view is centered on each individ-ual applicant. We read each stu-dent’s file holistically and in con-text of her or his school and com-munity.”Smith said that at times sib-lings may share similar back-grounds, causing them to havesimilar narratives, yet she empha-sized the fact that each applicanthas a unique story to tell.Though admissions officers donot specifically group multiplestogether, they do acknowledgewhen an applicant has a sibling inthe applicant pool. There is an op-tion on the Stanford Supplementfor applicants to indicate if theyhave a sibling who is also applyingto Stanford.“It may mean that she or he isa twin, triplet [or] multiple, but itcould also mean that one sibling isapplying as a freshman and anoth-er as a transfer or that one siblingis graduating early,” Smith said.“Sometimes a teacher or guid-ance counselor letter will alsomention that the applicant is atwin or triplet.”Even if each multiple gains ac-ceptance to the same university,there is still the common needamong siblings to differentiatethemselves from one another.However, many sets of twins whoattend Stanford note that the Uni-versity is large enough for each todevelop his or her own experience.Elena Ayala ’14 attends Stan-ford with her twin Alejandro. Shenoted that, during freshman year,they were placed on oppositesides of campus, and as a result,developed separate groups of friends. In fact, the only times theysaw each other were when theirparents visited.The two also focus on differentareas of academic study. Elenaplans to study English and sociol-ogy, while her brother enjoyscomputer science. Despite thesedifferences, however, this yearboth are taking Social Dance andcurrently live in Crothers Hall.“Though we have differentand separate lives, there is alwaysthe possibility of being able to seehim for help and companionship,”Elena said.Twins Melanie and VeronicaPolin ’14 observe similar experi-ences at Stanford.“In high school, it was a lotharder to separate,” Veronicasaid. “Growing up, we were a lotmore put together in different ac-tivities, but at Stanford, we’vebeen really able to pursue differ-ent interests and create our ownidentities.”Though they share similar cir-cles of friends and are roommatesthis year, the two have differentacademic interests. Melanie plansto major in biology, while Veroni-ca intends to study internationalrelations and economics.Melanie suggested that, whileshe enjoys having Veronicaaround, they experience no pres-sure to hang out all the time. Inparticular, Melanie looks forwardto studying abroad in order to liveindependently from her sister.“Studying abroad in a differentcountry will be an entirely new ex-perience,” Melanie said. “Forthree months, I’ll be able to seewhat life would be like withoutmy sister.”For freshmen, having a famil-iar face on campus can ease partof the anxiety that comes with thetransition to college. Arielle Ba-sich ’15 attends Stanford with hertwin brother Chase and said shebelieves that her adjustment tocollege life was made easier by thepresence of her brother.“I love having someone to talkabout friends and family backhome,” Arielle said. “Plus, he is mybest friend, so I couldn’t really askfor anything better.”Basich also noted that incom-ing freshman twins tend to beplaced into separate housing. Forinstance, she lives in Stern Hallwhile her brother lives in Flo-rence Moore Hall. She said shefeels this has essential to the cre-ation of her own college experi-ence independent of her twin.Elena, Melanie, Veronica andArielle all agreed that there aremany sets of twins at Stanford andthe pairs are able to relate andbond over a shared experience.“We can laugh at a lot of simi-lar things and tendencies that weknow and have,” Veronica saidwith a smile. “It’s a twin thing.”For many twins at Stanfordwhose siblings attend anotheruniversity, separating from theirother halves came with the initialdrastic change of leaving home.Mitch Wheeler ’14 is an identi-cal twin whose brother attendsthe University of Chicago. Theyare able to visit each other at leastonce a year and Skype fairlyoften. In addition, both Stanfordand the University of Chicago areon quarter systems, so they sharesimilar academic breaks. Never-theless, Wheeler admitted that thetransition to college was mademore difficult because his twinwas across the country.“ [When I am at home], I am al-ways with [him] doing some-thing,” Wheeler said. “When Icome to Stanford, I have a lotmore time alone to do my ownthing, but there are kids that kindof replace your twin.”Despite their geographic sepa-ration, Mitch and his brother areboth economics majors and oftentake similar classes.“In retrospect, it would havebeen nice and cool to have himwith me, to have somebody to dostuff with, to take the same classes[since] we’re the same major,” hesaid.Wheeler notes that if his twinhad come to Stanford, he proba-bly would have had a similar ex-perience. They are both involvedin Greek life and consider them-selves to be outgoing people,though they are more outgoing asa pair.Michael Celentano ’14 is a fra-ternal twin whose sister attendsWashington University in St.Louis. He also has two older sis-ters, but comments on how beingseparated from his twin is differ-ent than being away from hisother siblings.“The transition is much moreextreme with a twin because youare constantly together when[you’re] growing up,” he noted.“We were in the same grade andclasses, and our social lives over-lapped.”Celentano plans to study mathand physics and finds Stanford tobe the right fit for him, while hissister enjoys art and anthropologyand prefers the social environ-ment at Washington University inSt. Louis.Despite missing his sister, Ce-lentano said he believes physicaldistance is necessary in order todifferentiate himself from his twin.“It’s good to get space and ex-ercise independence,” he said.“We have to separate at somepoint. We’re not going to be witheach other for our entire lives, andcollege seems to be an appropri-ate time to start anew.“For everyone, there’s an ele-ment of entering a fresh environ-ment with completely new peo-ple. To have someone whom youknow really well diminishes thatelement,” he added.Though both their twins arenot at Stanford, both Wheeler andCelentano noted that being a twinis an integral part of their identity.They use the twin experience as aconversation starter and enjoyobserving and comparing othertwin relationships with their own.According to Basich, there isalso something to be said for mak-ing friends with other twins whoseexperiences going to school withor without their twin have affect-ed their undergraduate lives.“Once you meet someone whois a twin, you don’t forget it,” shesaid.
Contact Raymond Luong at rayluong@ stanford.edu.
S
itting next to the Mausoleum, the “Angelof Grief” might be the lesser known of thetwo Stanford landmarks, yet the image of an angel hunched over in tears is hard toforget. The statue is even more memo-rable for its meaning: It serves as an emblem of Jane Stanford’s grief over the loss of her brotherHenry Lathrop, who lived with her after LelandStanford Sr. died. Lathrop is buried beneath thestatue.“At the time that she [had the statue built],there was a bigger cemetery in the arboretum,”said University Archaeologist Laura Jones. “TheUniversity faculty, staff and employees were alsoburied [there].”Before she died, Jane Stanford had the ceme-tery in the arboretum moved to its present-day lo-cation on Arastradero Road.“She didn’t want the arboretum to be just acemetery,” Jones said. “There were more andmore graves, and she was concerned that it wasgoing to take over the entire arboretum.”Still, the angel stayed, even though it is not theoriginal statue Jane Stanford commissioned in1901. The first one was damaged in the 1906 SanFrancisco earthquake, and Charles Lathrop, an-other one of Jane’s brothers, arranged to have areplacement brought from Italy.“The original angel had a marble cupola overthe top of it,” Jones said. “That’s what fell in 1906.”Small marble tiles also surrounded the entireoriginal statue.Since its replacement, the University has madea strong effort to preserve the “Angel of Grief.” In1996, the original small marble tiles surroundingthe statue were replaced with plants in a restora-tion project.Although it sits in a secluded part of the ar-boretum, the angel is not immune to vandalism.The University once had to repair the angel’s armafter someone carved it off.“[The statue is] over-scaled slightly. If she stoodup, she would have been over seven feet tall,”Jones said. “We scaled it back slightly, and theCantor Arts Center curators reviewed it as well.This hand is slightly smaller than the other hand.If it was [made] to scale, it would have lookedmonstrous.”Jane Stanford’s grief and love for her brotherHenry, although captured in the statue itself, canbest be seen in a letter she wrote to Charles fol-lowing Henry’s death. In particular, she includedwords of instruction to ensure careful preparationfor the statue.“Dear brother, do not have any of these mar-bles unpacked until I get home,” she wrote in a let-ter written before the statue was erected. “Havethem carefully put in a safe, dry place.”Nowadays, the Angel is used as a more univer-sal memorial site for locals to mourn the loss of their loved ones.Still, the monument retains both its historiccharm and initial significance as Jane Stanford’stribute to the premature death of a beloved sib-ling, much in the same way that the Farm itself stands as a memorial to her deceased son and theUniversity’s namesake, Leland Stanford Jr.
 — Stephanie Wang
 The Stanford Daily
Tuesday, May 29, 2012
N
3
The Angel of Grief:
Snapshot of a statue
Twins on the Farm
F
EATURES
We’re not going to be with each other forour entire lives, and college seems to be anappropriate time to start anew.
— MICHAEL CELENTANO ‘14
Stanford Daily File Photo
“Angel of Grief,” a statue Jane Stanford dedicated to the memory of her deceased brother HenryLathrop, graces the arboretum on Stanford’s campus, just a stone’s throw away from the Mausoleum.
HISTORY CORNER
SERENITY NGUYEN/The Stanford Daily

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