Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Nickerson Pages From a History of Chatham, Massachusetts (1909)

Nickerson Pages From a History of Chatham, Massachusetts (1909)

Ratings: (0)|Views: 69 |Likes:
Published by teamnickerson
Extracted Nickerson Pages from 'A History of Chatham, Massachusetts' (1909).
Extracted Nickerson Pages from 'A History of Chatham, Massachusetts' (1909).

More info:

Categories:Types, Research, Genealogy
Published by: teamnickerson on May 29, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/29/2012

pdf

text

original

 
CHAPTER
V.
WILLIAM
NICKERSON
AND
THE
SETTLEMENT
OFMONOMOIT.
SUCH
was
the
situation
when,
in
or
about
the
year
1656,
William
Nickerson,
'
one
of
the
early
settlers
of
Yar-
mouth,
living
not
far
from
the
"reserve,"
desiring
to
pro-
vide
more
amply
for
his
family,
entered
intoa
bargainwith
Mattaquason,
the
saehem
of
Monomoit,
with
regard
tohis
land
at
that
plaee.
There
seems
to
have
been
no
elear
understanding
between
them
as
to
the
limits
of
the
land
bargained
for,
nor
wasany
deed
orwriting
passed
between
them.-
He
gave
the
Indians
a
boat
and
they
promised
him
some
land.
This
aet
was
not
onlyan
invasion
of
the
rights
of
the
"purchasers
or
old
eomers,"
but
was
a
violationofthe
law
forbidding
sales
to
and
purehases
from
the
Indians
withoutconsent
of
the
Plymouth
Colony
Court.
It
is
elear,
however,
that
Mr.
Nickerson
did
not
fully
understand
the
law
when
he
made
the
bargain.
He
admitted
the
pur-
chase,
but
claimed
no
intention
of
violatingthe
law.
4
Ig-
1.
The
name
was
formerly
frequently
written
Nicarson,
sometimes
Nicholson.
He
bimself
appears
to
have
written
it
Nickerson.
2.
Plym.
Col.
Rec,
IV,
162.
3.
The
statuterelating
to
purchases
of
laud
from
the
Indians,
passed
in1643,
readsas
follows:
"If
any
person
or
persons
do
hereafter
purchase,
rent
or
hyre
any
lands,
herbage,
wood
or
tymber
of
any
of
the
natives
in
any
place
within
this
Govern-
ment
without
the
consent
A
assent
of
the
Court,
every
suchperson
or
persons
shall
forfeit
five
pounds
for
everyacree
which
shal
be
so
purchased,
hyred,
rented
and
taken."
Plym.
Col.
Rec,
XI,
41.
4.
Dec.
1,
1063
William
Nickerson,
being
summoned
to
Court
to
answer
for
purchas-
ing
land
of
the
Indians
at
Monomoit,
"owned
the
same
but
Bayed
that
bee
had
done
the
same
of
Ignorance
<Vc"
(
Plym.
Col.
Rec,
IV,
49.)
May
3,
1665.
"If
I
had
knowne
that
the
order
fi.
e.
statute]
would
have
binesoe
understod,
I
should
not
have
done
it."
Statement
of
William
Nickerson
in
Plym.
Col.
Rec,
IV,
87.
 
56
HISTORY
OF
CHATHAM.
norance
of
the
law,
however,
then
as
now,was
no
excuse.
The
Colony
Court
found
him
guilty.
He
then
sought
to
set
himself
right
with
the
authorities
by
petitioning
them
in
the
usual
way
for
leave
to
make
the
trade,
but
they
would
allow
him
to
keep
only
a
portion
of
his
alleged
pur-
chase.
They
evidently
felt
that
he
should
incur
some
pen-
alty
lor
his
action,
even
though
he
had
acted
in
good
faith
ami
through
ignorance.
The
majesty
of
the
law
must
be
vindicated.
Probably
the
fact
that
his
purchase
was
a
very
lame
one
andwas
prejudicial
to
the
"purchasers
or
old
comers"
likewise
operated
tohis
disadvantage.
When
ne
lound
mat
the
authorities
would
not
allow
his
claim,
he
offered
to
resign
the
property
to
his
children,
but
without
securing
any
better
terms.
Later,
he
appealed
his
case
to
the
representatives
of
the
King
and
was
again
unsuccessful,
but
finally
obtained
what
he
desired
by
purchase
from
those
to
whom
the
Court
granted
the
tract.
Inasmuch
as,
during
this
controversy,
he
settled
upon
a
part
ofthe
land
bargained
for
and
became
the
founder
of
the
village
of
Monomoit,
a
brief
account
of
his
career
may
be
appropriate.
William
Nickerson
was
born
in
16<>3
or
1G04.
Ilis
father's
name
was
probably
Robert.
He
learned
the
trade
of
a
weaver
and
settled
in
Norwich,
Norfolk
County,
England.
lie
married
Anne,
daughter
of
Nicholas
Busby,
somewhere
about
1
(>.">()
and
four
children
were
born
to
them
before
1M7,
the
date
of
his
emigration
to
New
England.'
He
was
led
to
abandon
England
by
the
persecutions
of
Matthew
Wren,
then
Bishop
of
Norfolk,
whose
zealous
efforts
against
Non-conformists
within
his
jurisdiction
made
their
lives
miserable.
Historyinforms
5.
"The
examination
of
William
Nlckarson
of
Norwich
In
Norfolk,weaver,
aged
33,
and
Anne,
blB
wife,
aged
28,
with
four
children,
Nlcbo,
Kobartt,
Elizabeth,
Anne,
are
desirous
to
go
to
Boston
In
New
England,
there
to
Inhabit,
April
8,
1637."
HottPii'sLists
ol
Emigrants,
290.
Five
otiitr
children
were
born
to
tin
m
in
N<-«
England,
Samuel,
John,
Sarah,
William,
(baia
at
Barnstable
June
l,
1646)
ami
Joseph
I
born
at
Yarmouth
i>ec.
1647.)
 
SETTLEMENT
OFMONOMOIT.
5?
us
that
one
of
the
charges
brought
against
Bishop
Wren
by
a
Committee
of
Parliament
was
that,
during
the
term
of
two
years
and
four
months,
while
he
held
the
See
of
Norwich,"3,000
of
his
Majesty's
subjects,
many
of
whom
used
trades,
spinning,
weaving,
knitting,
making
cloth,
stutl',
stockings
and
other
manufactures
of
wool,
some
of
them
settinga
hundred
poor
people
at
work,"
"transported
themselves
into
Holland,"
and
"ollnr
purls
beyond
the
seas"
in
consequence
of
his
"superstition
and
tyranny."
Michael
Metcalf,
him-
self
a
wearer
of
Norwich
and
a
fellow
passenger
with
William
Nickerson,
writes
"I
was
persecuted
in
the
land
of
my
father's
sepulchres
for
not
bowing
at
the
name
of
Jesus
and
observing
other
ceremonies
in
religion,
forced
upon
me
at
theinstance
of
Bishop
Wren
of
Norwich
and
his
Chan-
cellor
Dr.
Corbet,
whose
violent
measures
troubled
me
in
the
Bishop's
Court
and
returned
me
into
the
High
Com-
missioner's
Court."
"My
enemies
conspired
against
me
to
take
away
my
life
and,
sometimes,
to
avoid
their
hands,
my
wife
did
hide
me
in
the
roof
of
the
house,
covering
me
over
with
straw."
6
It
was
to
avoidsuch
persecutions
that,
on
April
15,'
1637,
a
company
from
Norwich
and
vicinity
(including
William
Nickerson
and
family)
took
ship
at
l\tfb\\m
7imasought
the
protection
ofthe
New
World.
7
They
arrived
safely
at
Salem
on
June
20
following,
8
and
the
G.
N
E.
Hist.
&
Gen.
Register,
VI,
171.
7.
Of
this
party
of
emigrants
was,
also,
Samuel
Lincoln,
the
ancestor
of
the
Martyr
President.
He
was
then
eighteen
years
ol
age
and
came
with
the
family
of
Francis
Lawes,
to
whom
he
was
apprenticed.
Mr.
CharlesCarleton
Coffin
in
his
Life
of
Lincoln
describes
the
situation
as
follows
:
"The
bit-hop
preached
that
the
King
conld
do
no
wrong.
Charles
wantedmoney,and
levied
taxes
without
consulting
Parliament.
The
Puritans
who
would
not
pay,
together
withthose
who
would
not
acceptthe
ritual
pre-
pared
by
the
bishOD,
were
arrested—
so
many
thatthe
jail
and
(iuildhall
In
Norwichwere
tilled.
The
persecution
of
the
bishop
and
the
arbitrary
actsof
the
King
made
life
so
bitter
that
thousands
of
Puritans
<1
1
«
i
t
England
forever.
Many
of
the
people
of
Nor-
folk
and
Lincoln
counties
had
sailed
for
Massachusetts;
others
were
ready
to
join
them.
The
ships
Rose
and
the
John
and
Dorothy
were
at
Yarmouth
preparing
to
sail.
Francis
Lawes
resolved
to
become
an
emigrant,
and
it
seems
probable
that
Samuel
Lincoln
was
ready
to
join
his
biother
who
had
settled
in
lllngham
near
Boston.
We
see
them
travelling
across
the
meadows
and
lowlands,
with
others,
to
Yarmouth
town.
Together
the
ships
sail
across
the
Atlantic
todroit
their
anchors
in
Salem
Harbor."
8.
Wlnthrop,
History
of
New
England
I.
271.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->