Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
4Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
fhfa letter img-511162030-0001

fhfa letter img-511162030-0001

Ratings: (0)|Views: 561 |Likes:
Published by Foreclosure Fraud
4closureFraud.org
4closureFraud.org

More info:

Categories:Types, Research, Law
Published by: Foreclosure Fraud on May 31, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/31/2012

pdf

text

original

 
Federal
Housing
Finance
Agency
ct~o:~e~ter
Washmgton,
D.C.20024
Telephone:
(202)649-3800Facsimile:(202)
649-1071
www
fhfa.gov
May11,2012The
HonorableNoreen
Evans
Co-Chair,Conference
Committee
onAssembly
Bill
278
and
Senate
Bill
900State
Capitol,
Room
4032
Sacramento,
California
95814
The
HonorableMikeEng
Co-Chair,Conference
Committee
onAssembly
Bill
278
and
Senate
Bill
900State
Capitol,
Room
4016
Sacramento,
California
95814
TheHonorable
Sam
Blakeslee
Member,
Conference
Committee
onAssembly
Bill
278
and
Senate
Bill
900State
Capitol,
Room
4066
Sacramento,
California
95814
The
Honorable
Donald
P.
Wagner
Member,
Conference
Committee
onAssembly
Bill
278
and
Senate
Bill
900State
Capitol,
Room
4153
Sacramento,
California
95814
The
Honorable
Ronald
S.
CalderonMember,Conference
Committee
onAssembly
Bill
278
and
Senate
Bill
900State
Capitol,
Room
5066
Sacramento,
California
95814
RE:
Conference
Committee
on
Financial
Services
Legislation
SenatorEvans,
Assemblyman
Eng,
Senator
Blakeslee,
Assemblyman
Wagner
and
Senator
Calderon:
On
behalf
of
the
Federal
Housing
Finance
Agency
(FHFA),I
wishtoprovide
FHFA’s
viewsregarding
legislation
pendingbeforeyour
Conference
Committee.
FHFA
is
the
regulator
for
the
Federal
HomeLoan
Banks,
including
the
Federal
HomeLoanBank
of
San
Francisco,FannieMae
and
FreddieMac
and
allhave
operations
in
California.
Fannie
Mae
andFreddie
Mac
are
currently
operating
in
conservatorships
with
the
support
of
taxpayers
tomaintain
a
positivenet
worth.
Since
the
legislationunderconsideration
affectsmortgagemarketsand,
in
particular,
addresses
thedefault
and
foreclosure
processes
as
well
as
provisionsrelating
to
homeowners
and
tenants,
I
hope
that
FHFA’s
views
would
benefityour
deliberations.
 
Page
2
While
there
areseveral
bills
before
you,
I
will
address
two.The
absence
of
commentson
other
measuresdoes
not
constitute
any
endorsement
of
the
other
legislation,
but
rather
a
focus
on
the
items
of
greatest
consequence.
Assembly
Bill
2425/Senate
Bill
1471
AB
2425/SB
1471
contains
provisions
thatwould
require
servicers
to
establish
a
single
point
of
contact
and
imposesignificant
civil
penalties
for
“robosigned”
documents.
FHFA
is
concerned
that
the
“robosigning”
provisions
of
SB
1471
are
disconnected
from
the
issues
first
giving
rise
to
this
practicein
judicial
states,
go
wellbeyondanything
in
the
National
MortgageSettlement
andpose
significant
risks
for
the
housingmarket.The
“robosigning”
provisions
of
SB1471
are
overlybroad
and
disproportionate
to
the
perceived
problem.
As
reportedin
the
press,
“robosigning”
resulted
from
the
high-volumegeneration
of
affidavitsby
persons
who
lackedtherequisite
“personal”
knowledgeto
sign
the
affidavits;
thiscontrasts
dramatically
with
the
legislative
provisionsin
the
bill
that
purport
to
address
robosigning~
While
the
National
MortgageSettlement
refers
to
“robosigning”
as
the
“repeated
false
attestation
of
informationin
affidavits,”
it
nowhere
contains
an
actual
definition
of
“robosigning.”
Bycontrast,Section
2924.17(a)
of
SB1471
would
define
a
“robosigned”
document
broadlyto
include
“any
document”
that-
containsfactual
assertions
that
are
“not
accurate”
or
are
“incomplete.”
Theproposed
bill
would
allow
the
Attorney
Generalor
a
districtattorneyto
punish
any
entitythat
records
or
files
a
“robosigned”
documentby
imposing
a
$10,000
“civil
penalty”
per
such
document.
No
exception
is
made
under
this
civil
penalty
for
any
technical
or
minor
errorin
a
foreclosure
document,
even
in
cases
where
the
borrower’s
default
and
thelender’s
right
to
foreclose
is
uncontested.
The
vague
reference
to
an
“incomplete”
document
raises
serious
questions
about
compliance
with
a
mostuncertain
legal
requirement.
Further,
this
creates
a
standard
for
any
erroneous
component
of
a
foreclosure
process,
a
process
thatunder
California
lawmay
includehundreds
of
pages
of
materials,
many
not
central
to
the
rights
of
a
homeowner,
and
ties
this
broad
and
vaguelanguage
to
a
strictliability
standard.
Such
a
strict
liability
approach
is
punitive,
will
have
a
chilling
effect
on
theprocessing
of
lawful
foreclosures
and
will
result
in
lenders
and
investors
re
evaluating
the
risks
attendant
to
marketoperationsin
the
state
andmay
lead
to
reduced
creditavailability
or
higherinterest
rates.
Theprivate
remediessection
that
SB1471
separately
creates
for
borrowers
compoundsthe
challenges
for
lenders.
Based
onno
more
than
an
averment
of
a
borrower’s
“reasonable
belief”
that
a
foreclosure
document
has
been
“rob
osigned,”
Section
2924.18makes
the
courts
available
for
a
borrower
to
seekan
injunction,
attorney’s
fees,costs
and$10,000
ormore
in
damages.
While
a
borrower
may
not
recover
for
a
violation
that
is
“technical
or
de
minirni.c
innature,
the
proposed
bill
leaves
that
defense
to
the
vagaries
of
litigation
and
to
a
required
defense
by
a
lender
that
couldentail
tens
of
thousands
of
dollars
in
litigation
costs.
Thepotential
recovery
for
a
defaulted
borrower
and
plaintiffs
counsel
will
merely
encourage
litigation
as
part
of
a
strategy
to
forestall
a
lawfulforeclosure
orextract
a
settlement.
In
the
end,
California’s
non-judicial
foreclosure
process,
that
has
served
the
State
well
and
allowed
a
faster
recovery
of
its
housingmarket,
will
suffer.
 
Page
3
Assembly
Bill
2610/Senate
Bill
1473
AB
2610/SB
1473
is
intendedtoprovide
greater
protectionsto
tenants
by
incorporating
portions
of
thefederal
“Protecting
Tenants
at
Foreclosure
Act”
(“ProTAFA”)
into
California
law.
FHFA
is
concerned
that
this
bill
could
encourage
fraud
and
abuse
of
the
foreclosure
process.
Federallawcontains
a
definition
of
a
“bona
fide”
tenancy.
Under
ProTAFA,
a
lease
or
tenancy
is
“bonafide”
if
thetenant
is
not
the
mortgagoror
the
parent,
spouse
orchild
of
the
mortgagor;
the
lease
or
tenancy
is
theresult
of
an
arms-lengthtransaction;
and,
the
lease
or
tenancyrequires
rentthat
is
not
substantially
lower
thanfairmarket
rent
or
is
reduced
or
subsidized
due
to
a
federal,
state,
or
local
subsidy.
This
lack
of
a
“bona
fide”
lease
requirementunder
AB
2610/SB
1473
fails
to
account
for
the
possibility
that
property
owners
could
“gamethe
system”
by
leasing
property
at
belowmarket
rates
orpreventing
thenew
owner
from
taking
possession
for
90-days
orthe
duration
of
the
lease
with
the
“renter.”
This
type
of
event
has
been
seen
in
practice
under
the
current
federallaw
and
the
availability
of
the
“bona
fide”
lease
requirement
has
helpedavoid
fundamentallyfraudulent
practices.
Foreclosure
DelaysUnfortunately,
as
noted
here,
some
of
theproposals
underconsideration
in
theConference
Committee
present
unnecessaryand
counterproductive
approaches
to
addressing
housingmarket
issues
and
the
needs
of
homeowners
andtenants.
FHFA
is
well
aware
of
the
challenges
facing
states
and
localities
from
the
housingcrisis—homeownerslosing
their
homes,
erosion
of
the
tax
base
and
resulting
curtailment
of
local
services
and,
in
many
areas,
blighted
neighborhoods.Theenactment
of
local
laws
and
ordinances
thatresult
in
unintended
consequences
andfail,
in
many
instances,
to
achieve
their
goalsdoes
not
assist
homeowners,neighborhoods
or
the
localities.
Statelaws
that
stretch
out
the
period
for
legitimateforeclosures—after
every
effort
is
made
to
avoidforeclosure
and
to
keep
homeowners
intheirhomes
result
in
no
added
benefit
for
the
homeowner
and
produceharm
to
thehousing
finance
systemand
to
neighborhoods.
Simplyattaching
the
terminology
of
consumer
protection
to
legislation
does
not
mean
it
will
benefit
a
consumer
and
adverse
consequencesneed
to
be
examined.
Increasing
legal
risks
for
lendersand
investors—
whereexisting
remediesexistand
wherenew
languagecreates
incentives
forlitigation—
ultimately
creates
harm
for
all
homeowners.
Adding
impediments
to
actions
undertakenafterdefault
andlayering
restrictions
onlegitimate
foreclosures,
thereby
permitting
homeowners
to
stay
in
their
homes
for
hundreds
of
days
while
not
paying
their
mortgages,
property
taxes
or
homeowner’s
association
dues,
costs
neighborhoods,
costs
lendersand,
ultimately,
costs
local
taxpayers
and
future
borrowers.
Clearly,
laws
governing
thedefault
and
foreclosure
process
must
be
followed.
Where
there
are
violations,
theyshould
be
sanctioned.
However,
adding
new
laws,
proceduresand
requirementswhere
sanctions
havebeen
applied
and
remedial
steps
taken,may
only
add
to
delays
and
produceno
different
outcome
for
homeowners
who
have
received
appropriate
efforts
at
loan
modificationsor
foreclosure
avoidance
approaches.
The
preferred
option
of
servicers
andlenders
is
to
keep
the
homeownerin
the
home.
In
the
end,
there
must
be
some
likelihoodthat
the
homeownerwho
has
defaulted
can
renewmeeting
their
obligations,
if
necessary
with
a
loan
modification,
or
can
avoidforeclosure
through
a
short
sale
orother
device;
if
not,
thenforeclosure
is
appropriate.Despite
discussion
regardingmediation,procedural
law
discrepancies,
“robosigning”
and
false
affidavits—

Activity (4)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
SLAVEFATHER liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->