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Castaneda - The Active Side of Infinity

Castaneda - The Active Side of Infinity

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Published by mackdude4703

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Published by: mackdude4703 on Dec 29, 2008
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09/25/2013

 
§
THE ACTIVE SIDE OF INFINITY
 
§
by Carlos Castaneda
"The sorcerers' revolution," he continued, "is that they refuse to honor agreementsin which they did not participate. Nobody ever asked me if I would consent to be eaten by beings of a different kind of awareness. My parents just brought me into this world to befood, like themselves, and that's the end of the story."CARLOS CASTANEDA was the author of ten bestselling books,
 
including the acknowledged classic
The Teachings of Don Juan
 
and most recently
The Art of Dreaming 
and
Magical Passes.
He
 
departed on his definitive journey in 1998.
 
2
THIS BOOK IS a collection of the memorable events in my life. DonJuan revealed to me as time went by that the shamans of ancient Mexico hadconceived of this collection of memorable events as a bona-fide device tostir caches of energy that exist within the self. They explained these caches as being composed of energy that originates in the body itself and becomesdisplaced, pushed out of reach by the circumstances of our daily lives. In thissense, the collection of memorable events was, for don Juan and
 
the shamansof his lineage, the means for 
redeploying 
their unused energy gathered themfollowing the recommendation of don Juan Matus, a Yaqui Indian shamanfrom Mexico who, as a teacher, endeavored for thirteen years to makeavailable to me the
cognitive world 
of the shamans who lived in Mexico inancient times. Don Juan Matus's suggestion that I gather this collection of memorable events was made as if it were something casual, something thatoccurred to him on the spur of the moment. That was don Juan's style of teaching. He veiled the importance of certain maneuvers behind themundane. He hid, in this fashion, the sting of finality, presenting it assomething no different from any of the concerns of everyday life.Don Juan revealed to me as time went by that the shamans of ancientMexico had conceived of this collection of memorable events as a bona-fidedevice to stir caches of energy that exist within the self. They explained thesecaches as being composed of energy that originates in the body itself and becomes displaced, pushed out of reach by the circumstances of our dailylives. In this sense, the collection of memorable events was, for don Juan andthe shamans of his lineage, the means for 
redeploying 
their unused energy.
 
3
The prerequisite for this collection was the genuine and all-consumingact of putting together the sum total of one's emotions and realizations,without sparing anything. According to don Juan, the shamans of his lineagewere convinced that the collection of memorable events was the vehicle for the emotional and energetic adjustment necessary for venturing, in terms of  perception, into the unknown.Don Juan described the total goal of the shamanistic knowledge that hehandled as the preparation for facing the
definitive journey:
the journey thatevery human being has to take at the end of his life. He said that throughtheir discipline and resolve, shamans were capable of retaining their individual awareness and purpose after death. For them, the vague, idealisticstate that modem man calls "life after death" was a concrete region filled tocapacity with practical affairs of a different order than the practical affairs of daily life, yet bearing a similar functional practicality. Don Juan consideredthat to collect the memorable events in their lives was, for shamans, the preparation for their entrance into that concrete region which they called the
active side of infinity.
 Don Juan and I were talking one afternoon under his ramada, a loosestructure made of thin poles of bamboo. It looked like a roofed porch that was partially shaded from the sun but that would not provide protection at all fromthe rain. There were some small, sturdy freight boxes there that served as benches. Their freight brands were faded, and appeared to be more ornamentthan identification. I was sitting on one of them. My back was against the frontwall of the house. Don Juan was sitting on another box, leaning against a polethat supported the ramada. I had just driven in a few minutes earlier. It had been a daylong ride in hot, humid weather. I was nervous, fidgety, and sweaty.

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