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Bernstein - Aesthetic Alienation From Kant to Derrida and Adorno

Bernstein - Aesthetic Alienation From Kant to Derrida and Adorno

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01/29/2013

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To my father and sister
and in memory of my mother
LiteratureandPhilosophy
A. J. Cascardi, General EditorThis new series will publish books in
a
wide range of
subjects
in philosophy and literature, including studies of the socialand historical issues that relate these two fields. Drawingon the resources of the Anglo-American and Continentaltraditions, the series will be open to philosophicallyinformed scholarship covering the entire range of contemporary critical thought.
The Fate of Art
Aesthetic Alienation from Kantto
Derrida
and Adorno
J. M. Bernstein
The Pennsylvania State University PressUniversity Park, Pennsylvania
 
Copyright
© J. M.
Bernstein
1992
First published
1992
in
the United States
by
The Pennsylvania State University
Press,
Suite
C,
820 North University Drive, University Park,
PA
16802All rights reservedISBN
0-271-00838-5
(cloth)ISBN
0-271-00839-3
(paper)
Library
of
Congress
Cataloging in Publication Data
A
CIP
catalogue record
for
this book
is
available from the Library
of
CongressIt is the policy
of
The Pennsylvania State University Press
to
use acid-free paper
for
the first printing
of
all clothbound books. Publications
on
uncoated stock satisfythe minimum requirements
of
American National Standard
for
Information
Sciences—Permanence
of
Paper
for
Printed Library Materials, ANSI 239.48-1984Typeset
in
IOV2
on
12
pt
Ehrhardtby Graphicraft Typesetters Ltd., Hong KongPrinted
in
Great Britain
by T J
Press, Padstow
Contents
AcknowledgementsList of AbbreviationsIntroduction: Aesthetic Alienation1 Memorial Aesthetics: Kant's
Critique of Judgement
Judgement without KnowledgeImperative Beauty?The Antinomy of Autonomous Aestheticsa Free and Dependent Beautyb Free Beauty and the Ideal of Beautyc The Beautiful and the Sublimeiv The Question of Reflective Judgementv Beauty and the Labour of Mourningvi Indeterminacy and Metaphysics (AnticipatingDeconstruction)vn
IX
17182329323538445563
2
The
Genius
of
Being: Heidegger's
'The
Originof the Work
of
Art'i Introduction: Imagination
and
Finitudeii Overcoming Aesthetics (I): Thing, Historicity
and
Double Readingiii Overcoming Aesthetics (II): Great
Art
iv Great
Art
and Genius:
On
Being Exemplary666672
82
89
 
CONTENTS
v Genius, Community and Praxisvi Art and Technologyvii Earth, World and Alterity: The
Polis
as Artviii Aesthetic AlienationThe Deconstructive Sublime:
Derrida's
The Truth in Painting
i Art, History and Languageii Painting without TruthThere is PaintingInterrupting MetaphysicsFraming the Without End of Pure BeautyFraming the SublimeSublimity or Tragic Politics?
in
iv
vi
vu
4 Constellations of Concept and Intuition:
Adorno's
AestheticTheory
i Reinscribing Aesthetics: Modernism, Autonomy andSynthesisii Synthesis, Illusion and Non-identityiii Without Purposeiv Art, Technology and Nature5 Old Gods Ascending: Disintegration and Speculation in
Aesthetic Theory
i Rationalization, Differentiation and Categoriesii Disintegration, Sacrifice and Truthiii Truth or Communication?iv Truth and Speculationv Speculation, Art and PoliticsNotesIndex99108116130136136140148155159166175188190197206212225225233241248261275289
Acknowledgements
This work would not have taken its present shape had it not been forthe intense and congenial atmosphere I have enjoyed in the PhilosophyDepartment of the University of Essex over the past dozen years. In particular, I must thank Robert Bernasconi; his enthusiasm for Heideggerkept me reading him, and it was he who first explained to me Heidegger'shistory of being. During the decade we were colleagues, we shared ourfirst reading of Derrida with each other, and a lot more.While I have learned much from several research students in theDepartment, I must mention Nick Land; Michael Newman, who helpedme to understand Van Gogh and modern art; Olivier Serafinowicz; and
Ian
Williamson, whose efforts in helping me translate passages fromAdorno's
Aesthetic Theory
will be a bonus for all readers of this text. Ifthere is credit here, it must be his; mine is the blame.Three friends read the manuscript as a whole and offered advice, criticism and support. No one will read this work as carefully and thoughtfullyas Robert Pippin did. His pages of criticism and argument shaped thedirection of my rewriting. Howard Caygill knew just what I was tryingto do and told me how to do it better. He and Gillian Rose gave meBrighton during the summer of 1988 where the first draft of chapter 4 waswritten. There is no one to whom I am closer intellectually and spirituallythan Gillian Rose; what is best in this work would not have been therewithout her. For the rest I alone am responsible.My editor at Polity Press, John Thompson, kept faith and through hiscautions made me produce a more generally accessible text.Portions of this work have been published previously as: 'Aesthetic

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