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Investing to Save: an economic analysis of British Red Cross health and social care services

Investing to Save: an economic analysis of British Red Cross health and social care services

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Published by British Red Cross
This report tells the stories of five people who have recently been supported by British Red Cross staff and volunteers. They show the value of time-limited practical and emotional support which responds to people’s individual needs and wishes at times of transition and vulnerability.

This personalised support has helped all of these people live independently and with dignity in their communities.

It is increasingly important to be able to show how preventative services such as ours deliver savings for statutory partners.

To support us in evaluating these savings, we asked nef consulting to carry out an independent economic analysis of our work with these people. They have assessed the costs which could have been incurred by the state to treat and deliver care to these five people had our services not been there.

They have estimated that our support delivered savings of between £700 and £10,430 per person. This reflects a minimum return on investment of over three and a half times the cost of our service, and in most cases significantly more.

We know how valuable our services are to the people we support, their families and their carers. This report shows the value they also deliver every day to a range of statutory services, bridging gaps between professionals and saving money.
This report tells the stories of five people who have recently been supported by British Red Cross staff and volunteers. They show the value of time-limited practical and emotional support which responds to people’s individual needs and wishes at times of transition and vulnerability.

This personalised support has helped all of these people live independently and with dignity in their communities.

It is increasingly important to be able to show how preventative services such as ours deliver savings for statutory partners.

To support us in evaluating these savings, we asked nef consulting to carry out an independent economic analysis of our work with these people. They have assessed the costs which could have been incurred by the state to treat and deliver care to these five people had our services not been there.

They have estimated that our support delivered savings of between £700 and £10,430 per person. This reflects a minimum return on investment of over three and a half times the cost of our service, and in most cases significantly more.

We know how valuable our services are to the people we support, their families and their carers. This report shows the value they also deliver every day to a range of statutory services, bridging gaps between professionals and saving money.

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Published by: British Red Cross on Jun 06, 2012
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British Red Cross
 
44 MooreldsLondonEC2Y 9AL Tel: 020 7877 7284Fax: 020 7562 2000redcross.org.ukPublished 2012
 
 The British Red Cross Society,incorporated by Royal Charter1908, is a charity registered inEngland and Wales (220949)and Scotland (SC037738)
 
1
 This report tells the stories o ve people who have recentlybeen supported by British Red Cross sta and volunteers. They show the value o time-limited practical and emotionalsupport which responds to people’s individual needsand wishes at times o transition and vulnerability. Thispersonalised support has helped all o these people liveindependently and with dignity in their communities.While the outcomes or individuals speak or themselves, it isincreasingly important to be able to show how preventativeservices such as ours deliver savings or statutory partners. To support us in evaluating these savings, we asked ne consulting (new economics oundation) to carry out anindependent economic analysis o our work with thesepeople. They have assessed the costs which could havebeen incurred by the state to treat and deliver care to theseve people had our services not been there
1
. They have estimated that our support delivered savingso between £700 and £10,430 per person. This refects aminimum return on investment o over three and a hal timesthe cost o our service
2
, and in most cases signicantly more.We know how valuable our services are to the peoplewe support, their amilies and their carers. This reportshows the value they also deliver every day to a range o statutory services, bridging gaps between proessionalsand saving money.
1. The challenges o varying service provision and access criteria should be acknowledged. It is possible that these peoplemay not have been able to access every service that they could have beneted rom, and where appropriate, we havedistinguished between projected and potential additional savings.2. Costs depend on the length and requency o support provided by each service. In these case studies, costs range rom £90to £330 per service user. The photographs used in this publication are o models and there is no intention to associate any o them with any o theconditions or circumstances reerred to in this publication. Names have been changed to protect anonymity.
 
£1,035£2,227
3
Mr Bradley
Mr Bradley was reerred to theBritish Red Cross as he could notcope alone and particularly neededhelp with paperwork, which he wasnding overwhelming.From an initial visit to Mr Bradley,we ound that he was extremelydepressed and lonely. He wasnot eating or drinking much, otengoing or days with no ood. Thiswas particularly concerning givenhis diabetes and regular insulininjections. He was also very worriedabout his nances as his ex-partnerhad dealt with money issues.We visited Mr Bradley once a dayand oered practical and emotionalsupport to help him get back onhis eet. We helped him with hispaperwork, and in the course o thissupport we discovered he had bankaccounts in his name that he wasunaware o, and that his ex-partnerhad taken both his passport andbirth certicate with her.We alerted the saeguardingocer to Mr Bradley’s nancialconcerns. We helped him ll outorms to declare his passport andbirth certicate as lost or stolenand helped him complete and sendhis benets orms. We also edback to Mr Bradley’s GP ourconcerns about his diet, andorganised regular deliveries o prepared meals to ensure that hewould be eating properly.We then put Mr Bradley in touch withvarious other orms o help, includingarranging a visit rom his diabeticnurse, linking him into a localberiending service, and organisinga meeting with the Citizens AdviceBureau, who helped him get in touchwith a solicitor to discuss his houseand children. We were alsoable to organise support or Mr Bradleyrom Age UK. Ater a period o intensive support,we continued to visit Mr Bradleyand help him set up longer-termsolutions. He now has a beriendingvolunteer, a counsellor, regularappointments with the diabeticnurse and better control o his healthand personal care. He also hasa better outlook on lie and eelshe has the support to cope withday-to-day lie and start regaininghis independence.
Our support allowedMr Bradley to startregaining hisindependence andrebuilding his condencewhile learning new waysto cope.
He said the support he receivedrom the British Red Cross gave himantastic emotional support at hislowest point and helped him tostart taking back control o his lie.
2
Providing practical and emotionalsupport to Mr Bradley saved thestate money in two ways:
We prevented Mr Bradley’sdepression worsening
Ongoing and worsening depressioncan increase the likelihood o asuicide attempt or a long recoveryperiod. It is likely that without oursupport Mr Bradley’s depressionwould have worsened, to the extenthe would have required some at-home medical assessment and care.It is likely Mr Bradley would haverequired a residential GP visit toassess his mental health, andwould have then needed supportrom social services home care. Aresidential GP visit costs, on average,£121 and home care support orservice users with mental healthproblems costs £162 per week
1
. It islikely that social care support wouldbe needed weekly or three months(13 weeks) at a cost o £2,227.
We prevented Mr Bradley’sdiabetes worsening and causingcomplications
Mr Bradley was not providing orhis own basic needs, which couldhave had very harmul eectsalongside his diabetic condition. The cost o treating diabetes andits associated complications issignicant, comprising around 5 percent o the total NHS budget
2
. Theannual cost o treating diabetes andcomplications is £2,944 per person.
3
 Complications with the conditionaccount or around 35 per cent o this (or £1,035)
4
. It is possible thatwithout our intervention this wouldhave led to a hospital admission,including ambulance transer (£180
5
 )and inpatient stay (£2,334
6
 ).
Overall, the support wedelivered to Mr Bradleyrepresents total avoidedcosts to the state obetween £3,262 and £5,776.Impact o our support
Outcome Prevented diabeticcomplication AssumptionCost o treatingdiabetic complication(35 per cent o totalcost) or one year
 
Outcome Prevented GP visitand home caresupport AssumptionOne GP visit andhome care supportor 13 weeks
Mr Bradley, 50, livesalone, suers romagoraphobia anddepression, and istype one diabetic.His relationship withhis long-term partnerrecently broke down,and he has had nocontact with her or histhree children since.He has no other amilyand only one closeriend in the area.
£3,262 –£5,776
1. PSSRU (2011),
Unit costs of health and  social care 2011
, The University o Kentpublications. £21 represents the cost o acommunity nurse, per visit (pages 106-108,taken rom: Community Care Packages orOlder People). We assume this is a low boundgure representing the act that Mr Bradley wasunable to cope with daily necessities himsel,e.g. ood preparation.2. Diabetes in the UK (2004), a report romDiabetes UK available at
www.diabetes.org.uk/Professionals/Publications-reports-and- resources/Reports-statistics-and-case-studies/ Reports/Diabetes_in_the_UK_2004/ 
3. Ibid.4. Ibid.5. National Audit Oce (2011),
Transforming the NHS ambulance services
: presentation to the Houseo Commons.
www.connectingforhealth.nhs.uk/  systemsandservices/pathways/news/fullreport. pdf 
. The unit cost or ambulance services rangesrom £144 to £216, i.e. a mean unit cost or this is£180 per call.6. PSSRU (2011).
 Avoided state costs
Projected savingsPotentialadditional savings
£2,514
Outcome Prevented ambulancecall out andunnecessary hospitaladmission AssumptionOne ambulancetranser and inpatienthospital stay (averagelength)
£3,262

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