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Times Leader 06-08-2012

Times Leader 06-08-2012

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Published by The Times Leader
The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 06-08
The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 06-08

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C M Y K
WILKES-BARRE, PA FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012 50¢
timesleader.com
T
he
T
imes
L
eader
        7        6        0        5        7        2
Forty Fort church presents asummer festival on Tuesday.
THEGUIDE,PAGE7
Strawberry festa sweet $3 deal!
Seniors bid farewell to theirschoolsat5areaceremonies.
NEWS,6A,7A
Hey! Did you see who’s graduating?
 
JAMES,HEATBURNUPCELTICS
LeBronJames
had45pointsand15rebounds,overwhelmingtheBostonCelticsandleadingtheMiamiHeattoa98-79victoryThursdaynightthatforcedaGame7intheEasternConfer-encefinals.Pushingawayeliminationrightalongwitheverydefenderwhotriedtostophim,Jamesshot19of26fromthefieldandfin-ishedfourpointsshyofhisplayoffcareer-highwhileplaying45minutes,notsittingdownuntilthevicto-rywaslongsecured.
1B
SPORTSSHOWCASE
IL BASEBALL
SWBYANKS6BULLS2
AMERICAN LEAGUE
RAYS7YANKEES3
NATIONAL LEAGUE
DODGERS8PHILLIES3METS3NATIONALS1
AccordingtotheU.S.LaborDepartmentanalysis, teenagers’ summer employmentisatitsstrongestsince2006,but16-year-oldRachel Thomas and her peers just aren’tseeing it.“I’ve been trying to get a job for a whileand I haven’t gotten one yet,” Thomas, of Hanover Township, said.“I’ve applied everywhere possible sinceI’m 15. I’ve applied to many places in themall, Kmart, Target, CVS. I’ll get an emailbackandthey’llsay,‘Thanksforyourappli-cation. We’ll be in touch.’ And then I neverget anything back,” Thomas said. Thomas said most of her friends whohave jobs say it’s because they knew themanagerwhohiredthem.“Idon’tknowany managers,” she said.Onthesurface,LaborDepartmentstatis-tics gathered by outplacement consulting firmChallenger,Gray&Christmassuggesta growing summer job market for teens. The number of 16- to 19-year-olds hired inMaytotaled157,000nationally–morethandouble the 71,000 jobs won by teens a yearearlier.May is the first month of the teen sum-mer hiring season, which ends in July. Thesolid hiring numbers for teens last monthrepresented a dramatic increase from thepaltry 6,000 teens hired in May 2010.
Statisticalimprovements
Despite the improvements, Challenger,Gray & Christmas says a growing numberof teens are abandoning the summer jobmarketbecausetheyjustcan’tfindjobs.Forexample, the number of teens hired
S U M M E R E M P LOY M E N T
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
RachelThomas,16,ofHanoverTownship,likemanyareateens,sayssheishavingtroublesofarfindingajob.Whilehiringofyoungpeoplehaspickedupnationwide,locallythestoryisabitdifferent.
Help wanted for job
Startlookingnow.
Shawn Boyer,chief executive officer of SnagA-Job.com, said employers startedthinking about their upcomingsummer staffing issues in April.
Getthewordout.
Tell everyoneyou know that you’re looking for a job in case they hear of an opening.Consider teachers, guidance coun-selors, coaches, your family doctorand veterinarian, your parents’friends, your friends’parents,etc.
Planforarepeatperformance.
If you had a job last summer andyou didn’t absolutely hate it, con-sider reapplying this year.
Beprofessional.
Make sure thateverything you include in your jobapplication is spelled correctly andis free of grammatical errors. Don’tuse all lowercase or all uppercaseletters, Boyer said. Be sure theemail address you put down isn’tsilly or distracting. The same holdstrue for the voice-mail prompt onyour cell phone or home phone.
Domockinterviews.
To work outthe jitters ahead of time, do a fewpractice interviews with someoneother than a friend or parent, Boyerrecommended.
Source:
msnbc.msn.com
T I P S FO R T E E N S
Teens find national stats for work opportunities don’t apply locally 
BySTEVEMOCARSK
 smocarsky@timesleader.com
andNODYIAFEDRICK 
Times Leader Intern
SeeJOB,Page14A
6
09815 10011
 WASHINGTON Suicides are surging amongAmerica’stroops,averagingnearlyonea day this year — the fastest pace in the na-tion’sdecadeofwar. The 146 suicides for active-duty troops inthefirst148daysoftheyearfaroutdistancetheU.S. forces killed in action in Afghanistan —about 50 percent more —according to Pentagon sta-tistics obtained by The As-sociated Press. The numbers reflect amilitaryburdenedwithwar-time demands from Iraq and Afghanistan that havetaken a greater toll thanforeseen a decade ago. Themilitary also is struggling  with increased sexual as-saults, alcohol abuse, do-mestic violence and othermisbehavior.Because suicides had lev-eled off in 2010 and 2011,this year’s upswing hascaughtsomeofficialsbysur-prise. The reasons for the in-crease are not fully under-stood. Among explana-tions, studies have pointedto combat exposure, post-traumatic stress, misuse of prescription medicationsandpersonalfinancialprob-lems. Army data suggestsoldiers with multiple com-bat tours are at greater riskof committing suicide, al-though a substantial pro-portion of Army suicidesare committed by soldiers who never de-ployed. The unpopular war in Afghanistan is wind-ing down with the last combat troops sched-uled to leave at the end of 2014. But this yearhas seen record numbers of soldiers being killedbyAfghantroops.TherealsohavebeenseveralscandalsinvolvingU.S.troopbehavior. The active-duty suicide total through May 27 compares to 125 in the same period last year,a17percentincrease.Andit’smorethanthe129.6 suicides that the Pentagon had pro- jected for this period based on the trend from2001-2011. This year’s January-May total is up24percentfromtwoyearsago,anditis15per-cent ahead of the pace for 2009, which ended
P E N TAG O N R E P O RT
Militarysuicidessurging
Reasons unclear, but studies point tocombat exposure, post-traumatic stress,medication misuse, financial problems.
ByROBERTBURN
 AP National Security Writer 
SeeSUICIDES,Page14A
“We arevery con-cerned atthis pointthat weare seeinga highnumber ofsuicides ata point intime wherewe wereexpectingto see alower num-ber of sui-cides.”
JackieGarrick
Head of theDefense SuicidePreventionOffice at thePentagon
 The last time Bill Moore was in Wilkes-Barre was 1982, the same yearhesenthisgrandmother’sbro-ken Sheaffer fountain pen to thecompany to take advantage of itslifetime guarantee. They sent himbackanewone.As the newly hired president of theGreaterWilkes-BarreChamberofBusinessandIndustry,Mooreisback in Wilkes-Barre for the firsttime in three decades with thesame fountain pen in his breastpocket. The pen, he noted, hasn’tchanged. But the city and regionmostcertainlyhave,andforthebet-ter.Less than a week into his new job, Moore, 59, said he is excitedabout the changes and the poten-tialheseeshere.He’sbeengladhandingchambermembers and community leadersnearlynon-stop.Ifit’snotanemail,it’s a phone call or someone stop-pingintohisPublicSquareofficetosayhelloandofferassistanceanda warmwelcome.Moore has had to balance that withthedemandsofhiselderlypar-ents’healthproblems,tryingtosellhis family’s home in Cheshire,Conn., and looking at new oneshere.“The community’s been fantas-tic,”Mooresaid.Andwhilehehasbeenaskedby the board to be visible in the com-
One ‘Moore’ time: Man returns to area to head chamber
Bill Moore says there ispotential in region he hasn’tseen here in three decades.
ByANDREWM.SEDER 
 aseder@timesleader.com
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
BillMoore,executivedirectoroftheGreaterWilkes-BarreCham-berofCommerce.
SeeMOORE,Page14A
PLAINS TWP. -- Mohegan Sun’splanned hotel and convention center will be unlike any in Luzerne County.Andthat’sagoodthingforanareawithaplethora of existing accommodations.Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs ismoving forward with plans to build a238-room hotel and 40,000-square-footconvention center adjoining the exist-ingcasinoandracetrackoffRoute315inPlains Township. Thehotelwillbeuniqueintheregionbecauseitsonsitecasinoandassociatedharnessracing,shows,shopsandrestau-rants make it a tourism draw in and of itself.It’s an amenity some area hotel andconference center owners said candidly that they can’t compete with, but they don’t necessarily need to.GusGenetti,ownerofGenetti’sHotel& Conference Center in Wilkes-Barre,saidMoheganSunhashadanimpactonhis restaurant and banquet business“fromthedaytheyopened,”andtheho-tel could also chip away at his lodging business.“They’re able to give very favorableterms because, after all, everyone is go-ingtodropanaverageof$50atthecasi-no when they’re done with their event,”
Mohegan Sun planning hotel with a difference
Impact of gambling, entertainmentand shopping mecca weighed.
ByMATTHUGHES 
 mhughes@timesleader.com
SeeHOTEL,Page14A
INSIDE
ANEWS:
Local 3ANation & World 5AObituaries 7A, 8ABirthdays12AEditorials13A
BSPORTS:
1BScoreboard 2BBusiness 9B
CCLASSIFIED:
1CComics18C
THEGUIDE:
Crossword/HoroscopeTelevisionMovies
 WEATHER
RyanBrennanMostly sunny, a shower.High78.Low53.
Details, Page10B
 
K
PAGE 2A FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Berdy,JohnBurnett,TheRev.KennethButera,MichaelCook,LeonaHowell,CarolKittle,KerryKluk,PaulLyons,DorothyMorgan,ReillyOndek,ElizabethPostens,GladysRoke,EvelynRozelle,CurtisShatrowskas,LouanneWeale,RobertZastavny,EugeneZukauskas,VincentZynel,Ronald
OBITUARIES
Page 7A, 8A
BUILDINGTRUST
The Times Leader strives tocorrect errors, clarify storiesand update them promptly.Corrections will appear in thisspot. If you have informationto help us correct an inaccu-racy or cover an issue morethoroughly, call the newsroomat 829-7242.
HARRISBURG – No playermatched all five winningnumbers drawn in Thurs-day’s “Pennsylvania Cash 5”game, so the jackpot will beworth $425,000.Lottery officials said 98players matched four num-bers and won $242.50 each;3,567 players matched threenumbers and won $11each;and 42,539 players matchedtwo numbers and won $1each.
Monday’s “PennsylvaniaMatch 6 Lotto” jackpot willbe worth at least $950,000because no player holds aticket with one row thatmatches all six winningnumbers drawn in Thurs-day’s game.
LOTTERY
MIDDAYDRAWING
DAILY NUMBER –
9-1-8
BIG 4 –
1-0-3-8
QUINTO –
3-8-2-3-3
TREASURE HUNT
10-19-22-27-28NIGHTLYDRAWING
DAILY NUMBER –
1-2-9
BIG 4 –
8-1-1-5
QUINTO –
8-6-2-8-0
CASH 5
09-15-20-27-35MATCH603-07-23-27-28-41
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VP/Chief Financial Officer(570) 970-7154
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Delivery Monday–Sunday $3.60 per weekMailed Subscriptions Monday–Sunday$4.45 per week in PA$4.85 per week outside PAPublished daily by:Impressions Media15 N. Main St.Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711Periodicals postage paid atWilkes-Barre, PA and additional mailing officesPostmaster: Send address changesto Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
+(ISSN No. 0896-4084)USPS 499-710
Issue No. 2012-160
DALLASTWP.ADallasMid-dleSchoolstaffmemberwassus-pended without pay earlier this weekonareportofinappropriatebehavior, law enforcement andschool district officials said Thursday.DallasSchoolDistrictSuperin-tendentFrankGalickisaidDallas Townshippolice,statepoliceandthe Luzerne County District At-torney’s Office are investigatinthe report.DistrictAttorneyStefanieSala- vantis confirmed her office’s in- volvement. “On Tuesday we be-gan the investigation,” she said.No charges have been filedagainst the unnamed staff mem-ber who worked at the middleschool on Conyngham Avenue.“It was reported to the admin-istration at the middle school onMonday,” said Galicki. The nextdaythedistrictbegananinternalinvestigation that determinedtherewasinappropriatebehaviorand the township police werecontacted, he said. Thetownshippolicecontactedthe District Attorney’s Office, which contacted thestatepolice,andbasedonthefindingsoftheirinvestigation, the staff member was placed on suspension with-out pay, Galicki added.He and Salavantis said thecould not comment further be-cause of the ongoing investiga-tion.
Dallasstaffer issuspended
Middle school workerdisciplined for allegedinappropriate behavior.
ByJERRYLYNOTT 
 jlynott@timesleader.com
JerryLynott
, a Times Leader staffwriter, can be contacted at 570829-7237.
SCRANTON – The co-ownerof a Kingston accounting firm was sentenced Thursday to 18months in prison for his guilty plea to charges he evaded paying income taxes.Jerome Pinkowski, 56, of Swoyersville,wasalsoorderedtopay $163,107 in restitution to thefederal government by U.S. Dis-trict Judge Richard Conaboy.Pinkowski and his partner,Christopher Wartella, 40, of For-ty Fort, were charged in Decem-ber with making false tax filingsthrough their business, Broody Associates on Warren Avenue.Pinkowski pleaded guilty toconspiracy to defraud the UnitedStates and making fraudulentand false statements. Prosecu-torssaidheandWartellaconspir-ed to defraud the Internal Reve-nue Service by under-reporting their employees’ wages to avoidthe payment of income and em-ployment taxes and by instruct-ing clients to re-classify wages asdistributions of income to evadethe payment of employment tax-es.In addition, Pinkowski willful-ly aided and abetted the prepara-tion of a client’s tax return that wasfalseandfraudulentinthatitunder-reported wages by approx-imately $21,340, which resultedin a failure to pay taxes in theamount of $5,214. Wartella pleaded guilty to onecount of tax evasion for underre-portinghispersonalincomefrom2004to2008,resultinginalossof $441,352 in taxes owed to thegovernment. He is scheduled tobe sentenced on July17.
Accountingfirm ownergets jail term
Times Leader Staff 
SUGARNOTCH–MainStreetresident Anthony Henicheck ad-dressed borough council Wednesdaynightabouttheprop-erty at 867-869 Main St.Henicheckdescribedtheprop-erty as a “safety concern” due tothenailsanddebrisleftbehindaf-ter the owners removed the sid-ingfromthedwelling.Henicheckalsostatedthereareseveralstray catsatthelocation,andhevoicedconcern the debris would harborother annoyances such as snakesand rats.MayorBillDavissaidhehasre-ceived numerous calls regarding thepropertyandhasmademantrips to the location, but actionhas to occur through legal chan-nels. It was announced that tem-porary Code Enforcer David Ko-biak would visit the property ownerswiththeintentiontogivenoticetocleanupthepropertyorface legal proceedings to con-demn the structure.Kobiak has agreed to act asSugar Notch’s temporary codeenforcer until a permanent offi-cer becomes available. This fol-lows the resignation of Carl Al-bers on May 31.Councilapprovedactiontoaddthe first canine patrol to the bor-ough’s police department. Offi-cer Chris Pelchar said the addi-tion of a trained canine to theforcewillbeastrongdeterrenttocrimeduetoadog’skeensenseof smell and hearing. As well, ca-nines are very efficient in search-ingformissingchildrenoradultssuffering from dementia.Pelchar added the presence of the police dog would also be in-strumentalindrugsearches.Pel-charannouncedthathisownper-sonal dog would be used, and heispayingforthetraining,newin-sertforthepolicevehicleandthefirst year’s insurance out of hisown pocket. The addition of thedog will be at no cost to the bor-ough.Also, all residents are asked tobe aware that there are individu-als who are calling and identify-ing themselves as representa-tives from the water companneedingtoreplaceawaterheater. This is a scam. In order to avoidbecoming a victim of this scam,residents should always ask forproper verification from the wa-ter company, officials said.
Sugar Notch addresses property concerns
Mayor says code enforcer willspeak to owners of MainStreet structure.
BySUSANBETTINGER 
Times Leader Correspondent
Due to the holiday, the next coun-cil meeting will be Thursday, July5 at 7 p.m.
W H AT ’S N E X T
 WILKES-BARRE Council-man Tony George said he has waited long enough to see re-ceipts from LAG Towing and hesuggested council think aboutstarting the process to terminatethetowingcompany’scontract.“The city has the right to re- view his records and his shop,”George said. “If he thinks he canthumb his nose at council, then we should begin proceedings toterminatehiscontract.”A phone message left on LAGowner Leo Glodzik’s cellphone wasnotreturned.George said he has been wait-ing more than a month to reviewLAG’s records after residentscomplainedtheywerebeingover-chargedfortowingfees.Aspartof hiscontractwiththecity,Glodzikis required to submit reports andreceiptstothecityforreview.Thecity administration has not de-manded that Glodzik providethose records, saying that the po-lice department keeps its own re-cordsofvehiclestowed.Council Vice Chairman BillBarrett said LAG should providetherecordstothecityandGeorgeshouldbeallowedtoreviewthem.“We should have the records,”Barrett said. “LAG should be re-quired to present them and com-plywiththecontract.”George’s statements were ap-plauded by residents in attend-ance at Thursday night’s councilmeeting. Bob Kadluboski, thecity’s former towing contractor,and Mark Robbins, a Forty Fortresident who has alleged a con-spiracy among LAG, the city po-liceandMayorTomLeightonformorethanayear,werebothelatedto hear George demand the re-cords.“This council needs to investi-gateLAGandthefeesheischarg-ing,Kadluboskisaid.Robbins gave council a list of someofLAG’sbillsandheofferedtoprovidecopiesofLAGbillsthathe secured through a right-to-know request. George said he wouldappreciateseeingthosere-cords. The list Robbins had showedfees in the hundreds of dollars --averaging between $400 and$600.“Council has to make LAG ac-countable,”Robbinssaid.Kadluboski and Robbins alsoasked council to look into themayor’s plan to lease the city’sparkingassets.Todayisthedead-lineforthereturnoftheRequestsfor Qualifications from prospec-tivebidders.Drew McLaughlin, the city’sadministrative coordinator, saidhe’s not sure what the procedure willberegardingthereleaseoftheRFQrespondents.Leighton approved the RFQ toinclude a minimum up front pay-mentof$20milliontobidonleas-ingtheparkingassetsfor30yearsor50years.Desman Associates, a Chicagobased parking consulting firm, wasretainedbythecity’sParking Authority to review the RFQ andrecommendwhatwouldbearea-sonableupfrontpayment.JerrySalzmanofDesmanAsso-ciateswouldnotdisclosewhatfig-ure he recommended, but it wasclearthefirmdidnotendorsethecity’s$20millionfigure.InalettertoTheTimesLeader,SalzmansaidDesmandidnot“inanyway”validatethe$20millionfigure.“Ifthereisanysuggestioninthepublic mind ... regarding the $20millionvaluesetforthintheRFQ,itisimportanttoclarifythatDes-man has not concurred with the value,” Salzman wrote. “It is aclear misinterpretation of ouropinion and absolutely incor-rect.”Leightonhasstatedthat$8mil-lionwouldcomeoffthetopoftheupfront payment to satisfy re-maining debt on the Intermodal Transportation Center ($7 mil-lion)and$1millionofdebtonoth-erparkingfacilities.Robbinssaidthecitywillneverget anything close to $20 millionupfront.Heprovidedacostanaly-sisthatshowedhiscalculationstobe a maximum upfront paymentofunder$7million.Council approved the appoint-ment of James Davis to the Park-ing Authority board, filling theseat of Joseph O’Brien, who re-signed. O’Brien has not attendedrecentauthoritymeetings.
W-B official wants tower fired
Councilman Tony George askscity council to start processto terminate LAG contract.
ByBILLO’BOYLE 
boboyle@timesleader.com
BillO’Boyle
, a Times Leader staffwriter, may be reached at 829-7218.
PLAINSTWP.
Townshippolicereportedthefollowing:ResidentsofGraveDrivereportedThursdaytheirmail-boxesweredamagedovernight.AnthonyMistoveofSheri-danLanewastakenintocustody around3:45p.m.Thursdayout-sidetheTurkeyHillstoreonSouthMainStreetonanarrest warrantfromHunterdonCounty,N.J.Hewaswantedonachargeofforgery.Mistoveinitiallypro- videdafalsenametopoliceand wastransportedtotheLuzerneCountyCorrectionalFacility.AwarrantwasissuedforthearrestofAmirJohnsonofWilkes-Barreforallegedlyviolatingaprotectionfromabuseorder.AprilCuascutreportedJohnsonthrewheragainstacarandas-saultedherattheLuzerneCoun-tyHousingAuthorityapart-mentsonSecondStreetlate Wednesdaynight.Johnsonlefttheareabeforepolicearrived.Anyoneknowingthewhere-aboutsofJohnsonisaskedtocontactPlainsTownshippoliceat570829-3432orLuzerneCounty911.
WILKES-BARRE
Policesaidtheyfiledacitationforha-rassmentagainstMichelleGarey,50,ofNorthHancockStreet.ColleenDrazba,alsoofNorthHancockStreet,reportedGarey  verballyharassedheraround3p.m.onSunday,policesaid.
HAZLETON
Policefileddrugchargesagainsttwomen Thursdayandseizedheroin,marijuana,drugparaphernaliaandU.S.currencyduringasearchofaresidenceat541W.MapleSt.Policesaidtheybegananinvestigationafterreceiving reportsJeffreyCastillo,22,wassellingheroinintheHazletonarea.TheysaidtheyconductedcontrolledandundercoverbuysfromCastilloandobtainedasearchwarrantforhisWestMapleStreetresidence.Castillowasarrestedoutsidetheresidenceafterleavingina vehicle.GibronCastillo,19,wasarrestedafterasearchoftheresidence,policesaid.PolicechargedJeffreyCastillo withfourcountsofdeliveryofacontrolledsubstance,fivecountsofpossessionofacontrolledsubstance,fourcountsofcrimi-naluseofcommunicationfacility andonecountofpossessionof drugparaphernalia.HewascommittedtotheLuzerneCoun-tyCorrectionalFacilityforlackof$50,000straightbail.GibronCastillowascharged withonecounteachofposses-sionofacontrolledsubstanceandpossessionofdrugparapher-nalia.Hewascommittedtothecountyprisonforlackof$10,000straightbail.
POLICE BLOTTER
PROVINCETOWN, Mass.  The biggest sensation on CapeCod right now isn’t the lobster,the historic lighthouses or itsrollingsanddunes.It’snotevenaKennedy.It’s a bear.Abruinbelievedtohaveswumabout 500 feet across the CapeCodCanalfromthemainlandonMemorialDayweekendhascap-tured the imagination of resi-dents as it traipses across thepeninsula. Officials say researchdatingtothe1700ssuggeststhisis the first bear on the Cape.Boston-areanewscastsarefea-turing daily updates on thebear’s whereabouts, and a CapeCodBearTwitterfeedhasnearly 1,300 followers. A local brewery is even offering bear-themedshirts.“Well, my goodness. How of-ten do you see a bear on CapeCod?saidMarionLarson,aspo-keswoman for the Massachu-setts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife.“It’sreallycoolandpeo-ple are really excited about it.”A Cape Cod Times reportertold the paper she spotted thebeararound6a.m.Thursdayandsaid it bounded across the roadlike a puppy. Thebear,likelyamaleabout3 years old, has been seen near achicken coop, a cranberry bog, agolfcourseandmorethanadoz-en other locations along a 60-mile stretch of the Cape fromSandwich east to Provincetown.Nowthatthebearhasreachedthe tip of the Cape, wildlife offi-cialssaytheymayattempttoim-mobilize and move it to an area where other bears live. Officialssaid bears don’t generally turnaround and go back where they came from, and it can’t go any farther east.“He’s at the end of the line, asfar as real estate,” Larson said. The bear can only be tranquil-ized if officials can isolate it in atree or some other confinedspace, said Laura Conlee, thestate’s bear expert.
Visiting black bear sensation for Cape Cod residents
Bruin is believed to haveswum across the Cape CodCanal from the mainland.
ByBRIDGETMURPH
 Associated Press
AP FILE PHOTO
AsignhangsaroundtheneckofawoodenbearattheentrancetotheOldVillageStore,inWestBarnstable,Mass.A200-poundblackbeariscapturingtheimaginationofresidents.
 
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012 PAGE 3A
L
OCAL
timesleader.com
 WEST PITTSTON
FEMA announces buyouts
F
ive West Pittston propertiesheavily damaged by Septemberflooding will be purchased and de-molished in the latest round of buyouts announced Thursday by theFederal Emergency ManagementAgency, or FEMA.Additional buyouts of flood-dam-aged properties are expected, FEMAsaid. The $690,220earmark for West Pittstonbuyouts was partof a $7.1millionpackage affect-ing 94 structuresin eight coun-ties, a release said.Municipalities must agree tomaintain and own the propertiesand keep them as open space. Ad-dresses of the approved West Pitt-ston properties weren’t immediately available.An estimated $66 million is ex-pected to be available for the proper-ty acquisition program in Pennsylva-nia as a result of Hurricane Ireneand Tropical Storm Lee. The federalgovernment covers 75 percent of thecost, with an additional 22 percentfrom the state and the balance fromother non-federal sources.
HANOVER TWP.
Club plans first ride
 The newly formed Faces of PrideMotorcycle Club will hold its firstbenefit ride on Saturday to helpdefray medical bills incurred by cancer victim Debbie Muller.Muller, 60, of Swoyersville, wasdiagnosed with stage 3 lung cancerthat spread to her lymph nodes.Registration for the 50-mile mo-torcycle ride begins at 9:30 a.m. atthe FOP Lodge 36, 210 E. DivisionSt., Hanover Township. The ride will begin at noon. The Faces of Pride club, based outof FOP Lodge 36, recently formed tohost benefit rides for various deserv-ing causes.For more information on the Mull-er ride or about the club, contactDave “Haz” Havard at 570-208-4875.
EXETER
Charged with sex assault
A Jenkins Township man wascharged by Exeter police with sex-ually assaulting ateenage girl whobecame pregnantand gave birth.Clyde Earl Ton-kin, 29, was ar-raigned Wednesday night with threecounts of involun-tary deviate sexualintercourse, and one count each of aggravated indecent assault, statu-tory sexual assault, indecent assaultand sexual assault. He was jailed atthe Luzerne County CorrectionalFacility for lack of $30,000 bail.Police alleged Tonkin assaultedthe girl when she was13-years-old. Tonkin convinced the girl to runaway with him to California in Feb-ruary before the girl gave birth. They were found in an Econo LodgeMotel in Streetsboro, Ohio, on Feb.6. The girl had been reported mis-sing by her family.
HARRISBURG
Lower Aqua hike OK’d
 The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission on Thursday voted 5-0to approve a lower rate increase thanrequested by Aqua Pennsylvania. The settlement is for an annualincrease in rates of $16.7 million, or4.1percent. The settlement wasreached among Aqua, the Commis-sion’s Bureau of Investigation andEnforcement, the state’s Office of Consumer Advocate and the AquaLarge Users Group. The company had originally requested an increasein rates of annual revenues of $38.6million, or 9.4 percent.As part of the approval, the aver-age residential customer residing inthe company’s Main Division using 4,745 gallons per month would see amonthly increase of $1.99 from$52.86 to $54.85.Under the company’s proposal,the average residential customer would have experienced a monthly increase of $5.08.
NEWS IN BRIEF
Tonkin
LAKEHARMONY--Abankagreedtopostponethesheriff’ssalescheduledfortodayoftheSplitRockResortafterafed-eral judge agreed to permit the receiverappointed to run the complex to beginmarketing the property for sale.U.S.DistrictJudgeA.RichardCaputoonWednesdaygrantedthereceiver,RO-PAAssociatesLLC,permissiontohireacompany that specializes in resort salesto seek a buyer for the financially trou-bled resort located in Carbon County.Certain parcels in the resort werescheduled to be sold at the CarbonCountysheriff’ssaletosatisfymorethan$21 million in mortgages that are owedto TD Bank of Portland, Maine. Thebank agreed to postpone the sale untilAugust, pending Caputo’s approval, toallow ROPA the opportunity to seek abuyer for the complex. TheSplitRockcomplex,ownedbyVa-cationChartersLTD.,ismadeupofvari-ous properties, including The GalleriaHotel,SplitRockLodge,anindoorwaterpark, a lake and the Westwood and Wil-lowbrook timeshare condominium de- velopments. It also includes the nearby the Mountain Laurel Resort and Spa.Incourtpapers,ROPAargueditwouldattract more interest and get a highersales priceif itcould packageallproper-tiestogetherforsaletoasinglebuyer,asopposed to having various propertiessold in a piecemeal fashion to separatebuyers at a tax sale.ROPA also argued a combined sale wouldalsobetterprotecttheinterestsof theresort’screditorsandroughly23,000timeshareowners,aswellashelpensuretheresort,whichisoneofthelargestem-ployersinCarbonCounty,wouldcontin-ue to operate.ROPAwasrequiredtoobtainCaputo’spermissionbeforeitcouldmoveforward with the sales effort. Caputo’s ordergrants ROPA permission to market theproperties, but it does not authorize asale should a buyer be found. The com-pany would be required to seek a sepa-rate court order to go through with any sale. Textron Financial, one of the resort’slargest creditors, convinced Caputo toappoint ROPA in December to manageandoperatetheresortcomplexbasedonevidence it was in dire financial straits.According to court documents filedthen, the resort was unable to pay taxeson the properties and had advised Tex-tronitwouldnotbeabletomeetpayroll.Since then, ROPA says it has stabiliz-ed operations of the resort, but it mustnow be sold to satisfy numerous judg-ments and pending claims from cred-itors.Itwasnotimmediatelyclearwhatim-pact a sale would have on creditors andtimeshare owners. ROPA is seeking per-missiontomarkettheproperty“freeandclear of all liens, claims and encum-brances,” which could mean certaincreditors would not be paid.Caputo’s order grants ROPA permis-sion to seek to sell the property, but itdoes not specifically state whether thatsale will be free of encumbrances.Attorneys for ROPA, Textron Finan-cial, TD Bank and Vacation Charters ei-ther did not return phone messages Thursday, or said they could not com-ment on the case.
Bank delays Split Rock sheriff’s sale
Judge permits receiver to seekbuyer for the financially troubledresort in Carbon County.
ByTERRIEMORGAN-BESECKER 
tmorgan@timesleader.com
FORTYFORTDisciplinaryprob-lems faced by the borough’s policechiefinanothercommunityhavehadno impact on his performance withtheborough’spolicedepartment,twoborough officials said.Chief Fred Lahovski was recently suspendedwithoutpayfor10daysby Nazareth borough, where he is em-ployed as a full-time officer. The ac-tion came two months after he wasdemotedfromdetectivetopatrolmanin the Nazareth department.Forty Fort resident Joe Homzaraised the issue at a borough councilmeeting this week. Homza said helearned of the Nazareth situationfrom news articles he read on the In-ternetandisconcernedtheissuesLa-hovski faces in Nazareth may reflectnegatively on Forty Fort.“Itdoesn’tmakeuslookgood.Heisrepresenting our community,” Hom-za said.Homza also questioned why La-hovski, who was hired in September, was permitted to maintain his posi-tion in Nazareth given the job de-scription for Forty Fort police chief says the person cannot be employedby another police department.Council President Joe Chacke andMayor Boyd Hoats defended Lahov-ski, saying his service in Forty Forthas been exemplary.“IthinkIcanspeakforacouncilasa whole that Chief Lahovski’s workhas been stellar,” Chacke said. “Traf-fic enforcement has increased, ar-rests and more thorough investiga-tions have occurred, police presenceis at an all-time high, and leadershipofthedepartmenthasbeenoutstand-ing.”Hoats said Lahovski also has beenofgreatassistanceinhelpingthebor-ough obtain grants.“He’s gotten us grants we didn’teven know about,” he said.As for holding a second position,HoatsandChackesaidLahovskinoti-fied officials of his employment withNazareth. Council agreed to waivethat provision as part of the negotia-tions to hire Lahovski.Hoats said the Nazareth positionhasnotinterferedinanywaywithLa-hovski’spositioninFortyFort,whichrequires him to work 24 hours per week. There have many instances when Lahovski worked more hours,he said.“He is here around the clock if needed,” Hoats said.According to an article that ap-peared May 8 in the Morning Callnewspaper in Allentown, Nazarethcouncilendorseda10-daysuspensionof Lahovski. No reason was given forthe suspension.Contacted earlier this week, Naza-
Forty Fortpolice chief defended
Nazareth’s disciplinary actionagainst Fred Lahovski not anissue, borough officials say.
ByTERRIEMORGAN-BESECKER 
tmorgan@timesleader.com
See CHIEF, Page 9A
State Rep. Tarah Toohil is concernedthatpublicsafetycouldbejeopardizedif morefundingisn’tallocatedtotrainandhire more state police troopers. Toohil, R-Butler Township, on Thurs-day co-chaired a joint public hearing,conducted by the House Judiciary Sub-committee on Crime and CorrectionsandtheSenateLawandJusticeCommit-tee, to gather testimony on the state po-lice complement in the Northern Tier where natural gas drilling is ongoing. The hearing was at the PennsylvaniaCollege of Technology in Williamsport.“Our goal was to hear firsthand howsome recent state police decisions areimpacting law enforcement efforts inthis area of Pennsylvania,” Toohil said,noting that many rural communitiestheredon’thavepolicedepartmentsandrely on state police for protection.Joseph Kovel, president of the Penn-sylvania State Troopers Association,said incidents to which state police at Towanda in Bradford County and atMansfield in Tioga County have respon-ded increased 26.5 percent and 54 per-cent, respectively, between 2009 and2011.Since2010,sixtrooperswereaddedtothe Mansfield station – a 26 percentmanpowerincreaseandfourwereadd-ed to Towanda – a 12 percent increase,Kovel said, adding that the need formore troopers there is critical.“What I ask this committee today is, where do we take the troopers from tocover these areas? How many extratroopersdoyouhaveinyourhomeareasthatyoucangiveuptocovertheMarcel-lus Shale region?” he said.Kovel said state police vacancies areapproaching450andthatnumbercouldreach 1,200 within a year because of re-tirements, leaving the ranks of troopers well below the required complement of 4,677. More cadet training classes areneeded, he said.Several speakers raised concernsaboutadecisionearlierthisyeartoclosethe state police Aviation Patrol Unit at Williamsport Regional Airport in Mon-toursvilleandhavetheAPUatHazletonMunicipal Airport pick up much of thecoverage area.“This move to the eastern part of thestate will add response time, increasefuel costs and will not cover the north-central area as the residents, police andemergency personnel are accustomed,”retired state police pilot Dennis Hoaktold the panel, adding that the state po-lice helicopter “has saved several lives.”John Yingling, director of public safe-tyforLycomingCounty,saidtheAPUinMontoursville helped rescue eight peo-ple during Tropical Storm Lee in 2011and helped scout forest fires in the Mar-cellus Shale area as well. ToohilsaidsheisconcernedabouttheeffectsoftheclosureoftheAPU,givena45-to60-minuteflytimefromHazleton,aswellastheramificationsofashortageoftroopers.Shesaidsheisdisappointedthestatepolicesentnorepresentativetothe hearing.Maria Finn, press secretary for thestate police and Governor’s Office of Homeland Security, said CommissionerFrank Noonan had a prior commitment
DONCAREY/THETIMESLEADER
A state police helicopter sits at the Hazleton Municipal Airport. Plans to shut down the Aviation Patrol Unit in Mon-toursville and shift coverage to Hazleton could compromise public safety, some at a hearing on Thursday worried.
Trooper troubles hearing focus
State Rep. Toohil worries aboutsafety in Shale region if more isn’tdone to put more troopers in field.
BySTEVEMOCARSK
 smocarsky@timesleader.com
See TROOPERS, Page14A
HARRISBURG – A woman serving a10-to20-yearprisonterminthe1991poi-soning death of her husband has beendenied parole from state prison for thesixth time.Joann Curley, 48, who is jailed at theState Correctional Institution at Cam-bridge Springs, Crawford County, waseligible for parole after January 2012. The state parole board said in a deci-sion this week thatthey denied Curley’sparole again due to“community sensitivi-ty and a negative rec-ommendation by pros-ecuting attorneys,stateprobationandpa-role spokesman LeoDunn said.Curley is eligible for parole each yearand her parole will be automatically re- viewed on or after December 2014,Dunn said.Curley was sentenced in July 1997 to10 to 20 years in prison after pleading guilty to third-degree murder in thedeathofher32-year-oldhusband,RobertCurley.Robert Curley became ill in August1991,washospitalizedandthenreleasedafter doctors were unable to come to adiagnosis.A few months later, he was taken totheHersheyMedicalCenter,wheredoc-torsrealizedhewasbeingpoisonedwiththallium, a colorless, odorless and taste-less metal.Robert Curley died on Sept. 27, 1991,and his family said there was so muchpoison in his system the damage was ir-reversible.Police learned years later that JoannCurley had been poisoning her husband with rat poison, starting just six weeksafter they were married.
Joann Curley once again denied parole
Area woman, 48, was sentenced in1997 in the poisoning death of herhusband, Robert Curley, in 1991.
BySHEENADELAZIO
 sdelazio@timesleader.com
Curley

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