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THE TWELVE: Book 2 of The Passage Trilogy by Justin Cronin

THE TWELVE: Book 2 of The Passage Trilogy by Justin Cronin

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In his internationally bestselling and critically acclaimed novel The Passage, Justin Cronin constructed an unforgettable world transformed by a government experiment gone horribly wrong.

With The Twelve, the story continues.

In the present day: As a man-made apocalypse unfolds, three strangers navigate the chaos, desperate to find others, to survive, to witness the dawn on the other side of disaster. Lila, a doctor and an expectant mother, has been so broken by the spread of violence and infection that she continues to plan for her child’s arrival even as society dissolves around her. Kittridge, known to the world as “Last Stand in Denver,” has been forced by loss of electrical power to flee his stronghold and is now on the road, dodging the infected, armed but alone and well aware that a tank of gas will get him only so far. April is a teenager fighting to guide her little brother safely through a minefield of death and ruin. These three will learn that they have not been fully abandoned—and that in connection lies hope, even on the darkest of nights.

A hundred years in the future: Amy, Peter, Alicia, and the others introduced in The Passage work with a cast of new characters to hunt the original twelve virals . . . unaware that the rules of the game have changed, and that one of them will have to sacrifice everything to bring the Twelve down.

The scope widens and the intensity deepens as the epic tale of sacrifice and survival begun in The Passage surges forward in its breathtaking sequel—The Twelve.
In his internationally bestselling and critically acclaimed novel The Passage, Justin Cronin constructed an unforgettable world transformed by a government experiment gone horribly wrong.

With The Twelve, the story continues.

In the present day: As a man-made apocalypse unfolds, three strangers navigate the chaos, desperate to find others, to survive, to witness the dawn on the other side of disaster. Lila, a doctor and an expectant mother, has been so broken by the spread of violence and infection that she continues to plan for her child’s arrival even as society dissolves around her. Kittridge, known to the world as “Last Stand in Denver,” has been forced by loss of electrical power to flee his stronghold and is now on the road, dodging the infected, armed but alone and well aware that a tank of gas will get him only so far. April is a teenager fighting to guide her little brother safely through a minefield of death and ruin. These three will learn that they have not been fully abandoned—and that in connection lies hope, even on the darkest of nights.

A hundred years in the future: Amy, Peter, Alicia, and the others introduced in The Passage work with a cast of new characters to hunt the original twelve virals . . . unaware that the rules of the game have changed, and that one of them will have to sacrifice everything to bring the Twelve down.

The scope widens and the intensity deepens as the epic tale of sacrifice and survival begun in The Passage surges forward in its breathtaking sequel—The Twelve.

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Publish date: Oct 16, 2012
Added to Scribd: Jun 11, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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10/04/2013

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Bernard Kittridge, known to the world as “Last Stand inDenver,” realized it was time to leave the morning the power went out.He wondered what had taken so long. You couldn’t keep amunicipal electrical grid running without people to man it, and as far as Kittridge could tell from the nineteenth floor, not a sin-gle human soul was left alive in the city of Denver. Which was not to say he was alone.He had passed the early hours of the morning—a bright,clear morning in the first week of June, temperatures in themid-seventies with a chance of blood-sucking monsters movingin toward dusk—sunning on the balcony of the penthouse hehad occupied since the second week of the crisis. It was agigantic place, like an airborne palace; the kitchen alone wasthe size of Kittridge’s whole apartment. The owner’s taste ran inan austere direction: sleek leather seating groups that were bet-ter to look at than sit on, floors of twinkling travertine, smallfurry rugs, glass tables that appeared to float in space. Breakingin had been surprisingly simple. By the time Kittridge had made his decision, half the city was dead, or fled, or missing.The cops were long gone. He’d thought about barricading him-self into one of the big houses up in Cherry Creek, but based on the things he’d seen, he wanted someplace high. The owner of the penthouse was a man he knew slightly, a regular cus-tomer at the store. His name was Warren Filo. As luck would have it, Warren had come into the store the day before thewhole thing broke to gear up for a hunting trip to Alaska. Hewas a young guy, too young for how much money he had— Wall Street money, probably, or one of those high-tech IPOs.On that day, the world still cheerily humming along as usual,Kittridge had helped Warren carry his purchases to the car. AFerrari, of course. Standing beside it, Kittridge thought: Why not just go ahead and get a vanity plate that says,
DOUCHEBAG
1
?A
 
question that must have been plainly written on his face, because no sooner had it crossed his mind than Warren wentred with embarrassment. He wasn’t wearing his usual suit, just jeans and a T-shirt with
SLOANSCHOOLOFMANAGEMENT
on thefront. He’d wanted Kittridge to see the car, that was obvious, but now that he’d allowed this to happen, he’d realized howdumb it was, showing off a vehicle like that to a floor manager at Outdoor World who probably made less than fifty grand ayear. (The number was actually forty-six.) Kittridge allowed himself a silent laugh at that—the things this kid didn’t knowwould fill a book—and he let the moment hang to make the point.
 I know, I know,
Warren confessed.
 It’s a little much. I told myself I’d never be one of those assholes who drive a Ferrari. But honest to God, you should feel the way she handles.
Kittridge had gotten Warren’s address off his invoice. By thetime he moved in—Warren presumably snug and safe inAlaska—it was simply a matter of finding the right key in themanager’s office, putting it into the slot in the elevator panel,and riding eighteen floors to the penthouse. He unloaded hisgear. A rolling suitcase of clothes, three lockers of weaponry, ahand-crank radio, night-vision binoculars, flares, a first-aid kit, bottles of bleach, an arc welder to seal the doors of the eleva-tor, his trusty laptop with its portable satellite dish, a box of  books, and enough food and water to last a month. The viewfrom the balcony, which ran the length of the west side of the building, was a sweeping 180 degrees, looking toward Interstate 25 and Mile High field. He’d positioned camerasequipped with motion detectors at each end of the balcony, oneto cover the street, a second facing the building on the oppositeside of the avenue. He figured he’d get a lot of good footage thisway, but the money shots would be actual kills. The weaponhe’d selected was a Remington bolt-action 700P, .338 caliber— a nice balance of accuracy and stopping power, zeroing out atthree hundred yards. To this he’d affixed a digital video scopewith infrared. Using the binoculars, he would isolate his target;the rifle, mounted on a bipod at the edge of the balcony, would do the rest.On the first night, windless and lit by a waning quarter moon,Kittridge had shot seven: five on the avenue, one on the oppo-

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walterqchocobo reviewed this
This is the sequel to the excellent book The Passage. I would definitely recommend reading this one shortly after finishing the first book. I found it difficult to remember who everyone was as some minor characters play bigger roles in this book. I had heard from multiple people (and some reviewers) that this book doesn't live up to the first one...and I would have to agree.

The book jumps around in time, starting with a visit to current day where the virus starting spreading and then jumping back into the future, shortly after the first book left off. I found that this book didn't pull me in quite as much as it felt more confusing and bogged down. If you are looking for action sequences like the first book, you will be disappointed. The not-really cliffhanger ending, unlike the "SERIOUSLY! I have to wait 2 years to find out what happens" ending from The Passage, sets up nicely for book three but I'm still left scratching my head about some details. Hopefully, everything will be explained.
melissarochelle_1 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
Read from October 21 to 26, 2012Read with caution, there are spoilers for both The Passage and The Twelve...One thing I hate about sequels: they tend to rehash the previous book's events a little too often. Cronin doesn't do that. In fact, he does little of it, instead he manages to connect references to events happening off-screen in The Passage to new characters introduced in The Twelve . He also filled in a lot of gaps from The Passage...a few I didn't even realize were there. [SPOILER When I finished The Passage I was shocked to learn that it would be a trilogy. I thought it told a complete story, what else did we need to learn? The world as we knew it had ended and everyone seemed to be dead or moving on. But I was still intrigued by The Twelve and enjoyed it A LOT despite what some critics say. In The TwelveThe Twelve, Cronin takes us back to the beginning and we learn about events in the US (we still don't really know about the rest of the world) while Wolgast and Amy were in their secluded cabin. And while it was annoying while reading The Passage that suddenly it jumps 100 years, it makes sense now. He was telling Amy's story in the first book and here he's telling a different story: that of Lila, Grey, etc. Sure Amy's still here. She has to be, but at the same time, Cronin is continuing to build his world and it takes a lot of words to do it justice. I appreciate that Cronin manages to tell a complete story in this book. He doesn't leave us with an annoying cliffhanger -- seems to be a trend in many trilogies these days -- the story that we begin in this one is also the story that is completed at the end. But the problem is that Cronin is a great storyteller at the beginning, but the ending always seems to happen a little too quick. It isn't quite as satisfying as one would like. I mean, ALL the action happens and then the story just kind of fades away.Nevertheless, I really liked this book and can't wait to read the final installment. I wonder what unknown gaps in the story Cronin will manage to fill next time. /SPOILER]
slvoight_1 reviewed this
Rated 2/5
I received this book as a Goodreads ARC giveaway. This was a good book and I really enjoy it even though I don't normally read sci-fi/fantasy.
jbd1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
A very good second installment in the series. Much like with the first book, I had a hard time setting this aside once I started: Cronin paces the story really well, and doles out details at just the right speed to keep the pages fairly flying by. More post-apocalyptic warfare as the intrepid band of remaining humans work to defeat the nasty super-vampires, their minions, and their human collaborators. Again I liked the occasional interspersed document/news report/&c., and Cronin really has figured out how to manage chronological shifts very well.And now, we wait for the finale ...
stefferoo reviewed this
Rated 4/5
The Twelve is the follow-up to The Passage and the second novel of what is a planned trilogy. In the first book, we saw the world before and after it was ravaged by a viral plague that turns its infected victims into vampire-like creatures. This sequel continues the saga, further chronicling our group of main characters in the post-apocalyptic future, as well as filling in the events of the past leading up to the outbreak.Plot-wise, our group of survivors in the future -- Alicia, Peter, Michael, Sarah, etc. and of course, the all important and influential Amy -- take action to fight back against the virals and their collaborators, and even aim to take down the twelve original infected plague-bearers from the government experiments performed before the world fell (hence, the title). That's the main story of this series, which I found enjoyable enough, but it wasn't what I liked best.Actually, even now I am surprised that I like this book as much as I do, given my tepid response to its predecessor and especially considering that The Twelve was written in much the same format and style. Though many of the characters in the first book return for the sequel, a few have perished and a handful more are also added. And not surprisingly, Justin Cronin continues to exhibit his long-windedness by insisting on writing back stories for pretty much every single one of them.While I'm usually one to welcome any and all forms of character development including back stories or other devices authors use to flesh out their characters, I recall that Cronin's way bothered me greatly in The Passage. The book wasn't what I expected; thinking I was going to get a good old-fashioned apocalyptic story, instead I was bogged down by chapters full of flashbacks and found myself wondering when we'll actually get to the part with the end of the world. I was several hundred pages deep already before it finally happened, and the worst part was, when it came it wasn't even all that great or exciting.That brings me to what I liked best about The Twelve. Yes, Cronin is still as verbose as ever, but the first part of the book and its focus on the early days of the plague and the downfall of the country was exactly what I wanted from The Passage, and which it didn't deliver. It was good to see some of that covered in the second book, even if it wasn't nearly as much as I'd hoped for. Still, it was something, and it filled in many of the missing pieces.I am also seeing how all the characters are coming together, their connections and relationships like loose threads finally being tied up. This actually made me feel a lot better about this series, since another one of my frustrations with the first book was how I would get emotionally invested in someone (while irritating at times, those lengthy back stories have a tendency to do that to me) only to see them die or have the story change perspectives or skip ahead in time. Often, this made me feel cheated and almost punished for caring about a character. After all, why spend all that time writing about them, just to kill them off and never return to them again?Well, The Twelve showed that this wasn't always the case. Some of the characters I never expected to see again from The Passage make an appearance, proving Cronin still has plans for them yet. That went a long way in mollifying me and assuring me that I didn't waste my time, and also gives me hope that the third book will continue this trend in weaving all these seemingly random characters together. After this book, I'm starting to get an inkling of just how big the web is.Only read this book if you've read the first one already, as this doesn't appear to be a story with a real beginning or end, all its parts seeming more like puzzle pieces coming together to form one overarching, comprehensive epic.
shelfmonkey reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Cronin’s The Passage was a big epic vampire novel, the kind we just don’t see much of anymore, mainly because of its quality. No sparkly vamps here, just monsters who quickly send the world back a hundred years. I thought it a trifle confusing, and the sequel The Twelve doesn’t actually clear up as many questions as I’d like: I’m still not entirely sure how Amy came to be singled out in The Passage, and the huge cast of characters is overwhelming. But it’s still a heckuva fun story, full of grit and grime and monsters and characters who die at a moments notice. I’ll be interested to read how Cronin ends this series, but I’m more intrigued as to where he’ll go after.
julie10reads reviewed this
Rated 3/5
In this second book of his epic vampire trilogy (after The Passage), Cronin once again deposits readers on the front lines of a human-made apocalypse. On the North American continent, a failed government experiment has turned most of humanity into lethal, vampirelike creatures called virals and destroyed the world as we know it. Cronin's story follows the human survivors, moving smoothly between "Year Zero," when the outbreak began, and a period 97 years later, when the remaining pockets of humanity seek not only to survive but also to eradicate the viral plague and defeat a despotic regime that has risen to power. Summary BPLEnjoyable sequel to The Passage. Somewhat too long--over 500 pages--with many characters to keep track of. I feel that the novel's length weakened the tension but then, does a sequel ever reach the same intensity as its predecessor? The ending bridges satisfyingly to Book 3; will Mr. Cronin unveil a new development in the virals to ratchet up the suspense? I hope so!7 out of 10. For fans of The Passage, post-apocalyptic and supernatural fiction.
justablondemoment reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Okay ummmm I don't know which I loved better. With the exception of the length, as in the first one, both of these books rocked my world.This would make an awesome movie. It was Stephen King-ish but not so much that you went ooh another king wanna be. Neither in the series are books to be taken lightly either they both were thinker books. If I really had to, I mean it would have to be like a gun to my head,choose..it would be this one as my favorite. The story is just soooo entrancing. In this book though I didn't find myself getting nearly as confused. I highly recommend this book and the 1st one in the series as well. That brings me to the only warning I have do not read them out of order. Cuz you will not "get it" and you will totally miss the experience of this world and the lesson to be learned within its words.
shine101_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Ein gewaltiges Buch, aber leider nicht so gut wie der erste Teil. Zu viele Personen wurden neu eingeführt, zu oft wurde gesprungen zwischen Zeiten und Personen. Man musste sich ständig neu einlesen. Das häufige Quälen der Leute hätte man sich sparen können.
lisally_1 reviewed this
The Twelve is the sequel to The Passage, in which humanity has been ravaged by vampire-like monsters. There are a lot of details and story threads to follow, and it would definitely benefit to read the reread The Passage immediately prior to starting The Twelve. There is a really unique recap at the beginning done in the style of the Bible, but I still found myself going back to the earlier book at points to refresh certain plot threads.The main story picks up five years later, with Peter, Alicia, Michael, and the other California survivors having settled in Texas. As in The Passage, about the half the novel occurs in the near future, in the immediate aftermath of the viral outbreak. Some characters from the first book are revisited, along with the some new characters who have survived the initial onslaught. While this does provide for a good read, the addition of yet more characters seems somewhat unnecessary, especially since main characters form the first book have been seemingly killed off in between.Cronin does do a great job tying both parts of the story together, past and present. The story centers around “The Homeland,” a city of survivors in Iowa ruled by the former director of Project NOAH. The Homeland is very unsettling and all too believable, a mix of concentration camp and totalitarian dictatorship.The Homeland story does tie in to the main plot of the titular twelve remaining virals, but the connection is not revealed until late of the story. Thus, most the novel feels more like a side story set in the same universe of The Passage, and tends to drag a bit. Introducing the connection to the main plot sooner may have worked better, and made the final battle a bit less anticlimactic. Still, the novel is just as well written and the characters well drawn as the first book. Not as good as The Passage, but there are some promising story threads that are still unresolved; hopefully Cronin will deliver in the final installment.

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