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The Hunter and the Trap

The Hunter and the Trap

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Published by OpenRoadMedia
The Hunter and the Trap contains two tales of speculative fiction from bestselling author Howard Fast. In “The Hunter,” celebrated but down-on-his-luck novelist Andrew Bell returns to New York from an African safari only to find himself the prey in someone else’s big game hunt. In “The Trap,” an ex-soldier is tasked with traveling the world to find children for a daring social and scientific experiment.
The Hunter and the Trap contains two tales of speculative fiction from bestselling author Howard Fast. In “The Hunter,” celebrated but down-on-his-luck novelist Andrew Bell returns to New York from an African safari only to find himself the prey in someone else’s big game hunt. In “The Trap,” an ex-soldier is tasked with traveling the world to find children for a daring social and scientific experiment.

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Published by: OpenRoadMedia on Jun 12, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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09/29/2013

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THE HUNTER From THE HUNTER AND THE TRAPBy HOWARD FAST
1
Of course I went out to Kennedy to greet Andrew Bell. He had sentme a wire that he was coming in on the two o’clock plane, and he had alsosent a wire to Jane Pierce, his public relations girl; so practically everyone inthe world knew that he was coming into Kennedy at two o’clock. My goingout there was of a particular nature, because sometimes I thought that I washis friend. Otherwise, why would he have sent me a wire?I called my wife to tell her about it, and she asked me when I thoughtI might see her again.“Well, tonight,” I said. “You know that.”“Do I?”“Come off it,” I said. “Andy Bell is my friend. What else do you wantme to do?”“He has ten thousand friends. He has friends in Istanbul and friends inParis and friends in Madrid and friends in London and of course in NewYork. I’ll bet he has friends in Albuquerque.”“All right.”“All right,” she repeated, and maybe she was sorry and had pushed ittoo far.
 
 
“It’s just a funny damn thing about friends,” I told her.“I know. And you’re the only real friend Andy Bell has or ever had.”“Maybe not even me,” I said. “I don’t know.”
2
I drove out to Kennedy, and the traffic was bad, so by the time we gotthere, the plane had already landed. You could not miss Andrew Bell, butneither could you get very near to him, and from the number of reporters,cameras and microphones you would have guessed an ambassador, a king or a prime minister had just landed. It was that kind of a crowd. There werecivilians, perhaps twenty or thirty, but for the most part the crowd was professional and the object of the crowd was news. Andy was news. He wasalways news.Jane Pierce spotted me, broke out of the crowd to grab my arm, andtold me to please go to him and let him see my face. She was a tall,competent blond, middle-thirties, polite, neutral and successful, andattractive in a hard way; and I was flattered that she felt that I should be withAndy. She had that manner of authority that brings importance wherever it isdirected.“He needs a hard friend,” she said in my ear. “Get over to him.”If there was a distinction between hard and soft friends, there wereenough in the second category. I saw Joe Jacobs, the columnist—tomorrowhe would do an entire column on Andy Bell, possibly a second one the dayafter that; and Frank Farrell from the News; and Linda Hawley, the society

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