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State of the State of California After School Programs, May 2012

State of the State of California After School Programs, May 2012

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Published by k12newsnetwork
UC Davis May 2012 report on the status of funding for and ease of access to after school programs.
UC Davis May 2012 report on the status of funding for and ease of access to after school programs.

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Published by: k12newsnetwork on Jun 12, 2012
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06/12/2012

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State of the State of California After School – May 2012
Overview of the State of the Stateof California After School
•InCalifornia,primarilystate–andsomefederal–fundingsupports
over 4,500 after school programs
withthecapacitytoservewell
over 450,000 students
inthe2011-12schoolyear.•Stateandfederallyfundedafterschoolprogramsserveexclusively
low-income communities,
manywithhighlevelsofEnglishLearners.•Afterschoolprogramsrequirealocalmatch,mettypicallythrough
leveraging additional funds
andencouragingcommunitypartnerships.Forexample,afterschoolprogramsleveragefederalfundstoprovideafterschoolsnacksandmealstotheirparticipants.•Supplementalstateandfederalafterschoolfundsalsosupportessential
summer learning opportunities
forlow-incomeyouth.•Still,stateandfederalafterschoolfundingis
unavailable forover 2,600 schools in low-income communities
andmanyexistingprogramshavewaitinglists.
Benefits of After School andSummer Learning Programs
•Afterschoolandsummerlearningprogramsincreasestudentachievement,preventcrime,improvehealth,andstrengthentheeconomy.•Afterschoolandsummerlearningprogramskeepkidshealthyandcombatchildhoodobesitybyofferinghealthyfoodandopportunitiesforphysicalactivity.•AfterschoolandsummerlearningprogramsareexiblelearningenvironmentswhereyouthcanengageinqualityScience,Technology,Engineering,andMathematics(STEM)andotherlearningopportunitiesthatmaynotbeofferedinthecoreinstructionalday.
Data in this report refect the most current data available (retrieved on April 18, 2012)rom CDE Dataquest (2010-2011) and the CDE Ater School Programs Division grantee database (2011-2012).
 
California AfterSchool Network
 After School Programs ServeLarge Numbers of California’s Neediest Students
Most After School Programs Are Funded by the State
N
earlyhalf(46%)ofpublicschools,attendedby44percentofCalifornia’s6.2millionpublicschoolstudents,providestateorfederallyfundedafterschoolprograms.Theseprograms,allofwhichincludeanacademicenrichmentcomponent,arelocatedalmostexclusivelyinlow-incomecommunitiesatschoolswhichservethemajorityofthestate’seconomicallydisadvantagedstudentsandEnglishLearners–keysubgroupsformanyschoolsanddistrictsinmeetingstateandfederalaccountabilitytargets
(see Table 1).
 Afterschoolprogramsserve63%ofCalifornia’slow-incomeschoolswhereatleast40%ofstudentsareeligibleforfreeorreducedpricemeals,consistentwithfederalTitleIstandardsforneedyschools.Amongthelowest-incomeschools,whereatleast50%ofstudentsqualifyforfreeorreducedpricemeals*
1
,morethantwo-thirds(68%)havethebenetofanafterschoolprogramtosupportstudents.Oftheover4,500schoolshostingstateorfederallyfundedafterschoolprograms,serving450,000students,98%areschoolsinlow-incomecommunities,andthoseschoolshaveanaverageof85%oftheirstudentseligiblefortheschoolmealprogram.ThosesameschoolsalsohaveahigherpercentageofEnglishLearners(38%)thanallpublicschoolsstatewide(23%)
(See Figure 1).
 A Majority of California’s After SchoolPrograms Serve Elementary andMiddle School Students
Moststateandfederalafterschoolfunding,includingallstateafterschoolfunding,serveselementaryandmiddleschoolstudents. Afterschoolprogramsarelocatedinhalf(50%)ofthestate’s7,234elementaryandmiddleschools.Theseprogramsserveover70%ofCalifornia’selementaryandmiddleschoolswhereatleast40%ofstudentsareeligibleforfreeorreducedpricemeals.
 After school programs serve 83% of California’s lowest-income elementary and middle schools,
whereatleast50%ofstudentsqualifyforfreeorreducedpricemeals.
Table 1. Free and Reduced Price Meal Eligibility and After School ProgramsFigure 1. Proportion of Economically Disadvantaged andEnglish Learners at After School SitesFigure 2. Proportion of California Elementary/Middle Schools with After School Programs
Number ofSchools(all gradelevels)Schools with After School ProgramsNumberPercentageStatewide9,8954,58446%
Low Income Schools
(40% or more Free/Reduced Price Meal Eligible)
6,7474,22363%Lowest Income Schools
(50% or more Free/Reduced Price Meal Eligible)
5,9394,04068%
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90
71%83%50%
% All Elementary/Middle Schools% Low Income Elementary/Middle Schools(
40% Free/Reduced Meal Eligible)% Lowest Income Elementary/Middle Schools(
50% Free/Reduced Meal Eligible)
1
ASES provides grant priority to programs serving schools with 50 percent or more of students eligible for the free or reduced price school meal program.
100%80%60%40%20%0%Average % Free/Reduced MealEligibilityAll SchoolsSchools with AfterSchool ProgramsAverage % EnglishLearners56%85%38%23%
 AfterschoolprogramsarefundedbyCalifornia’sAfterSchoolEducationandSafety(ASES)programandthefederal21stCenturyCommunityLearningCenters(21stCentury)program.PartofCalifornia’sfederal21stCenturyfundingisreservedforhighschoolsthroughtheHighSchoolAfterSchoolSafetyandEnrichmentforTeens(ASSETs)program.While21stCentury(includingASSETs)fundsprogramsat910schoolsites,ASESfundsprogramsatmorethanfourtimesasmanysites(4,089).Approximately9%ofCali-fornia’safterschoolprogramshavebothstateandfederalfunds(seeFigure3).Takingtheseschoolsintoaccount,Californiahasatotalof4,584publiclyfundedafterschoolprograms.AlthoughsomeschoolsitesprovideanafterschoolprogrambycombiningfundsfrombothASESand21stCentury,themajorityofpubliclyfundedafterschoolprogramsrelyexclusivelyonfundingfromthestate,asshownin
Figure 3.
 
State of the State of California After School
Unmet Need for After School Programs
Federal FundingOnly, 495
(11%)
Both Stateand FederalFunding, 415
(9%)
State FundingOnly, 3,674
(80%)
Figure 3. Number of California Schools with State vs. Federally Funded After School Programs
$0 $50 $100 $150 $200 $250Total federal fundingREQUESTED in mostrecent cohort (in millions)21stCenturyASSETs$15.6$213$122($197.4 Million in denied funding)$19.4($102.6 Million in denied funding)Total federal fundingAVAILABLE in mostrecent cohort (in millions)
Estimated breakdown of available funding between 21st Century and ASSETs programs isbased on statutory requirements and initial awards announced in May 2012.
 Althoughmostlow-incomeschoolshavestateorfederallyfundedafterschoolprograms,therearestill
over 2,600 low-incomeschools without programs,
includingover1,500elemen-taryandmiddleschools
(See Table 2).
Inaddition,morethanaquarter(26%)ofthestate’sover1.4millionEnglishLearnersattendschoolsthatdonotofferastateorfederallyfundedafterschoolprogram.
Table 2. Low Income Schools Withoutan After School ProgramFigure 4. Most Recent Cohort of Federal After SchoolFunding Illustrates Unmet Need in California
Low IncomeSchools(all gradelevels)Low-IncomeSchools(Elementaryand MiddleOnly)Lowest IncomeSchools (allgrade levels)LowestIncomeSchools(Elementaryand MiddleOnly)Statewide6,7475,1895,9394,012WithoutAfterSchoolProgram2,524(37%)1,526(29%)1,899(32%)698(17%)
 JustasthenumberofCaliforniasafterschoolprogramswithstatefundingdwarfsthenumberofprogramswithfederalfunds,thetotaldollarsallocatedbythestateheavilyoutweighsthefundingreceivedfromthefederalgovernment.Forthe2011-12schoolyear,approximately$539.4millioninstateASESgrantsandatotalof$144millioninfederal21stCentury($64.9million)and ASSETs($79.1million)grantswereawarded.Limitedfundingforafterschoolprogramsresultsinnumerousschoolsbeingdeniedtheopportunitytoservetheirstudentseitherinanafterschoolprogramorbyextendingexistingprogramsintosummer.Intherecentroundof21stCenturygrants(May2012),theCaliforniaDepartmentofEducationisawardingapproximately$35millioninfederalfundingfor21stCenturyelementaryandmiddleschool,andHighSchool ASSETsafterschoolandsummerprogramsforthe2012-2013schoolyear.AccordingtotheAfterSchoolProgramsDivisionoftheCaliforniaDepartmentofEducation,2,163sitesappliedforover$335millioninfundingtoserveover158,000students. Withdemandexceedingthesupplyofavailablefundingbyapproximately$300million,wellover100,000studentswillbedeniedthebenetofhighqualityafterschoolandsummerprogramsthatstateandfederalfundingmakespossible.Evenwhereprogramsexist,thereareoftenlongwaitinglistsofinterestedstudentsthatprogramsdonothavespacetoserveduetoinsufcientfunding.Givenstatutorygrantcaps,eachprogramisgenerallymeanttoserveonly83elementaryschoolstudentsand111middleschoolstudentsdaily–justaboutoneoutofeverysevenstudentsenrolledatanaverage-sizedschool.Morethanhalfofprogramssurveyedreporthavingwaitinglists.

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