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Public Opinion on the Supreme Court, 1937-2012

Public Opinion on the Supreme Court, 1937-2012

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As the Supreme Court prepares to hand down its end-of-term rulings, AEI’s Public Opinion team has examined current and historical views of the court and individual justices , comparing questions asked by more 30 major pollsters. Among the major findings of this AEI Public Opinion Study:

*Trust in the Supreme Court is down slightly for the major organizations with long trends. Harris found a seven-point drop in high trust between 1966 and 2011. Gallup shows a six-point drop between 1973 and 2011, and the National Opinion Research Center reports a two-point drop between 1973 and 2010.

* In a late May/early June CBS News/New York Times poll, 44 percent approved of the way the court is handling its job. In 2000, the first time Gallup asked the identical question about the court’s job performance, 62 percent approved.
The Pew Research Center’s measure of favorability for 2012 is the lowest in 25 years.

*People view the judicial branch more positively than the executive of legislative branches.

*Strong pluralities usually tell pollsters that the court’s ideological balance is “about right.” A Fox News question from 2012, for example, found that 45 percent thought the court was “about right” in its decisions, while 26 percent said it was “too liberal” and 21 percent “too conservative.”

*Americans believe that the justices bring their personal views to their decisions. In 1946, 43 percent said the court decided many questions based on politics. In a late May/early June 2012 CBS News/New York Times poll, 76 percent said the court decides cases based on personal and political views, not legal analysis. When asked specifically about the health care case, around 50 percent believe the justices will let their partisan or ideological views enter into their decisions.

* Most Americans are not familiar with individual justices. In a 2010 Pew poll, only 28 percent could identify John Roberts as the chief justice. During Roberts’s confirmation hearing in September 2005, 53 percent told Pew he was “generally considered” a conservative, and 25 percent didn’t know. Two years later, 37 percent said he was generally considered a conservative and 48 percent didn’t know. It is unlikely that the health care ruling will shape Roberts’s legacy in the public consciousness.


As the Supreme Court prepares to hand down its end-of-term rulings, AEI’s Public Opinion team has examined current and historical views of the court and individual justices , comparing questions asked by more 30 major pollsters. Among the major findings of this AEI Public Opinion Study:

*Trust in the Supreme Court is down slightly for the major organizations with long trends. Harris found a seven-point drop in high trust between 1966 and 2011. Gallup shows a six-point drop between 1973 and 2011, and the National Opinion Research Center reports a two-point drop between 1973 and 2010.

* In a late May/early June CBS News/New York Times poll, 44 percent approved of the way the court is handling its job. In 2000, the first time Gallup asked the identical question about the court’s job performance, 62 percent approved.
The Pew Research Center’s measure of favorability for 2012 is the lowest in 25 years.

*People view the judicial branch more positively than the executive of legislative branches.

*Strong pluralities usually tell pollsters that the court’s ideological balance is “about right.” A Fox News question from 2012, for example, found that 45 percent thought the court was “about right” in its decisions, while 26 percent said it was “too liberal” and 21 percent “too conservative.”

*Americans believe that the justices bring their personal views to their decisions. In 1946, 43 percent said the court decided many questions based on politics. In a late May/early June 2012 CBS News/New York Times poll, 76 percent said the court decides cases based on personal and political views, not legal analysis. When asked specifically about the health care case, around 50 percent believe the justices will let their partisan or ideological views enter into their decisions.

* Most Americans are not familiar with individual justices. In a 2010 Pew poll, only 28 percent could identify John Roberts as the chief justice. During Roberts’s confirmation hearing in September 2005, 53 percent told Pew he was “generally considered” a conservative, and 25 percent didn’t know. Two years later, 37 percent said he was generally considered a conservative and 48 percent didn’t know. It is unlikely that the health care ruling will shape Roberts’s legacy in the public consciousness.


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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: American Enterprise Institute on Jun 14, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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07/17/2012

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PUBLIC OPINION ON THESUPREME COURT
(Updated June 2012)
 
Compiled by Karlyn H. Bowman, Senior Fellow and Andrew Rugg, ResearchAssistant
 
AEI Public OpinionStudies
 
2
Table of Contents
TRENDS IN CONFIDENCE IN THE COURT 
.................................................................................. 4
 
 APPROVAL
........................................................................................................................................... 9
 
 FAVORABILITY 
................................................................................................................................. 12
 
THE COURT’S POWER AND BALANCE TODAY 
......................................................................... 13
 
THE IDEOLOGY OF THE NEXT JUSTICE, NEW COURT 
.......................................................... 17
 
THE PRESIDENT’S DECISION OR THE SENATE’S?
................................................................. 21
 
THE NEXT NOMINEE: LEGAL BACKGROUND AND OTHER ISSUES
................................... 24
 
 ELENA KAGAN 
.................................................................................................................................. 29
 
SONIA SOTOMAYOR
........................................................................................................................ 33
 
 JOHN ROBERTS
................................................................................................................................ 37
 
 HARRIET MIERS
............................................................................................................................... 45
 
 
SAMUEL ALITO
................................................................................................................................. 50
 
ORIGINAL INTENT 
........................................................................................................................... 55
 
WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT INDIVIDUAL JUSTICES
................................................................... 57
 
GENDER, RACE, AND ETHNICITY AND COURT NOMINEES
................................................ 62
 
 LEGAL ANALYSIS OR PERSONAL VIEWS: WHAT RULES/GUIDES THE JUSTICES
.......... 67
 
TRUST AND CONFIDENCE IN THE THREE BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT 
..................... 73
 

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