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Times Leader 06-15-2012

Times Leader 06-15-2012

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Published by The Times Leader
The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 06-15
The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 06-15

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Published by: The Times Leader on Jun 15, 2012
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02/02/2013

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INSIDE:
Dueling economic plans,
5A
 WEATHERLY Gov. MittRomney, the expected Republi-can Party presidential nominee, will be in Weatherly on Saturday morning.He will visitthe Weatherly Casting & Ma-chineCo.at300Commerce St.to discuss jobgrowth and theMarcellusShalegasindus-try’s benefits to the state.“I just got off the phone withthe Secret Service,” MichaelLeib, president of WeatherlCasting & Machine Co., said Thursday. “We had no idea he was considering coming here.I’m anxious to hear what he hasto say.”Leib’s company manufacturesitems used in mining and power
Mitt Romneywill visitWeatherly
GOP presidential candidatewill discuss job growth andshale industry benefits to Pa.
ByBILLO’BOYLE 
boboyle@timesleader.com
See ROMNEY, Page14A
Romney
C M Y K
WILKES-BARRE, PA FRIDAY, JUNE 15, 2012 50¢
timesleader.com
T
he
T
imes
L
eader
Outdoor markets are quiteabundant in our area.
THEGUIDE
Hey NEPA! Are you fresh?
Both will cost you about$235,000, says a new report.
NATION&WORLD,5A
How’s a Ferrarilike a child?
       7        6        2        3        6       5
 
HEAT100,THUNDER96
LeBron James
scored32 points and hit the clinch-ing free throws with 7 sec-onds left, Dwyane Wadeadded 24 points and theMiami Heat claimed home-court advantage in the NBAFinals by beating the Okla-homa City Thunder100-96 inGame 2 on Thursday night.The Thunder stormed backfrom a13-point, fourth-quarter deficit.
1B
THOMPSONLEADS,TIGERLURKS
MichaelThompsonhasathree-shotleadattheU.S.Openonalate-chargingTigerWoods.Woodsbirdiedback-to-backholes latein hisround and played the unlev-eled Lake Course with thekind of confidence that hasmade him a14-time majorchampion.
1B
SPORTSSHOWCASE
MLB
PHILLIES6TWINS1METS9RAYS6ORIOLES12PIRATES6
BELLEFONTE — The prose-cution’scaseinJerrySandusky’ssexabusetrialneareditsconclu-sion on Thursday after just fourdays of testimony, with threemore accusers taking the wit-ness stand, including a young man who said the former PennState assistant football coachraped him as a teen guest inSandusky’s home. The eighth accuser to testify told jurors the abuse began withfondling and forced oral sex andledtoseveralinstancesofrapeinthebasementofSandusky’sCen-tre County home, where hespent more than 100 nights and where his muffled screams wentunanswered by Sandusky’s wife,Dottie, who was upstairs. Hesaid he figured the basementmust be soundproof.“He got real aggressive and just forced me into it,” said the young man, now18 and a recenthighschoolgraduate.“AndIjust went with it there was nofighting against it.”He said under cross-examin-ation by Sandusky lawyer JoeAmendolathattheattackssome-times left him bleeding but that
THE SANDUSKY TRIAL
VICTIM9:
“He got real aggressive and justforced me into it. And I just went with it —there was no fighting against it.”
VICTIM3:
“He made me feel like I was apart of something, like a family. He gave methings that I hadn’t had before.”
Force, neglect alleged
AP PHOTO/CENTRE DAILY TIMES, ABBY DREY
Jerry Sandusky gets into attorney Joe Amendola’s car to leave the courthouse Thursday in Bellefonte. The prosecution’s case inSandusky’s sex abuse trial neared its conclusion on Thursday after just four days of testimony.
 Accusers talk of horrors, mixed emotions
ByMARKSCOLFOROandGENAROC.ARMAS 
 Associated Press
See SANDUSKY, Page14AINSIDE:
Producer touts new filmabout Joe Paterno,
14A
6
09815 10011
INSIDE
A NEWS:
Local 3ANation & World 5AObituaries 8ABirthdays12AEditorials13A
B SPORTS:
1B
B BUSINESS:
9B
C CLASSIFIED:
1CComics18C
THE GUIDE:
Crossword/HoroscopeMoviesTelevision
 WEATHER
Ryan Brennan Partlycloudy. High 78. Low 57.
Details, Page10B
State Auditor General Jack Wagner recently singled out thehigh number of deficient bridgesin Luzerne County, urging morefunding to address the problem. The Pennsylvania Departmentof Transportation has identified163bridgesclassifiedasstructur-allydeficientinthecounty,there-lease said. The stateowns 108bridges onthe list, andmost of therest belong to the coun-ty.Structur-ally defi-cientbridges areconsidered safe for travel butneed costly repairs or replace-ment to meet current standards,the state says. Many require weight limits.State Democrats are pushing for a $2.8 billion plan that wouldupgradethestate’sinfrastructureand create thousands of jobs. Thestateplanstobidcontractsto rebuild more than 600 struc-turally deficient bridges state- wideoverthenexttwoyears,saidtransportation department
County’sshakybridgesmake list
State transportationdepartment identifiesstructurally deficient spans.
ByJENNIFERLEARN-ANDES 
 jandes@timesleader.com
See BRIDGES, Page14A
View a list ofstructurally defi-cient bridges at
www.dot.state.pa.us/.
Click onthe “bridge in-spection” link and“bridge informa-tion.”
O N T H E W E B
PLAINSTWP.–Theprogramtobringtogetherthecommunityandmake it better after the shooting death of a Wilkes-Barre teenagertwomonthsagoisnolongertaking smallsteps,butstartingtorun,itsorganizerssaid.Building Bridges is looking tobecome a nonprofit organizationandbuildonthefoundationbeinlaidattownhallmeetingsliketheone held Thursday night at Solo-mon-PlainsElementarySchool.Approximately60peoplepartic-ipatedinthetwo-hoursessionandbrokeupintosmallgrouptoidenti-fysomeofthefactorscontributinto violence among youth, such asdrugs and alcohol abuse, lack of moral foundation and breakdownof the family structure, and offersolutions for residents, schools,lawenforcementandcityadminis-trators. The meeting, arranged inadvance, came a day after twoteenagers were shot in a play-ground on the Boulevard Town-homes along Wilkes-Barre Boule- vard. Thegrassrootscommunitypro-gram developed from the April 5shootingof14-year-oldTylerWin-steadnearhishomeonHillStreet.Ittookawhiletogeloutofconcernof acting too hastily, said PastorShawn Walker of the First Bap-
Building Bridges feels momentum building
Group formed in wake oftragedy looks to nonprofitstatus to build on progress.
ByJERRYLYNOTT 
 jlynott@timesleader.com
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Shivaun O’Donnell writes down ideas from her group that alsoincluded Bob Evans, Denise Mosley, Ethel Long and RaphaelMosely at Thursdaynight’s Building Bridgessession.
See TEENS, Page14A
 The men spent hours on the witness stand, describing inoften graphic detail the sexualabuse they allegedly enduredfrom Jerry Sandusky. Their testimony was un-doubtedly an “excruciatingly painful and traumatic experi-ence,” said psychologist Rob-ert Griffin of Forty Fort.As the prosecution preparesto rest its case, the alleged victims face a new challenge:the psychological aftermath of having had to relive the trau-ma, Griffin and other childsexual abuse experts say.“One concern is this stirs upemotions that people havetucked far away in their mem-ory,” said Dr. Richard Fisch-bein, a forensic psychiatristfrom Kingston who treatssexual offenders and victims.Some people who are sex-ually abused as children sufferfrom post traumatic stressdisorder, which can lay dor-
 Victims still must deal  with reliving trauma 
ByTERRIEMORGAN-BESECKER 
tmorgan@timesleader.com
See VICTIMS, Page14A
Woods
 
K
PAGE 2A FRIDAY, JUNE 15, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Dominick,MaryGuiliano,GraceHavard,DavidJr.Malone,HelenMerlie,JosephMitchnechSeeher-man,HeidiMurray,WalterSwain,HowardJr.Tomalis,Ruth
OBITUARIES
Page 8A
ASTORYPUBLISHED
onPage 8A on June10 incorrect-ly identified Dr. David Green-wald, an oncologist, as aspeaker at the second annualBreathe Deep NortheasternPennsylvania event held atKirby Park.
ACLARIFICATIONNEEDSTOBE
made to a defendant’saddress in a story that ran onPage 9A in the June 8 edition.Updated court records showthat John Francis Theroux,54, who was sentenced onpossession of child pornog-raphy, now lives in Forty Fort.
BUILDINGTRUST
The Times Leader strives tocorrect errors, clarify storiesand update them promptly.Corrections will appear in thisspot. If you have informationto help us correct an inaccu-racy or cover an issue morethoroughly, call the newsroomat 829-7242.
HARRISBURG – No playermatched all five winningnumbers drawn in Thurs-day’s “Pennsylvania Cash 5”game, so the jackpot will beworth $445,000.Lottery officials said102players matched four num-bers and won $231each;3,826 players matched threenumbers and won $10 each;and 46,321players matchedtwo numbers and won $1each.
Monday’s “PennsylvaniaMatch 6 Lotto” jackpot willbe worth at least $1.50 mil-lion because no player holdsa ticket with one row thatmatches all six winningnumbers drawn in Thurs-day’s game.
LOTTERY
MIDDAYDRAWING
DAILY NUMBER –
5-0-2
BIG 4 –
0-1-4-6
QUINTO –
0-6-9-4-2
TREASURE HUNT
06-10-12-21-23NIGHTLYDRAWING
DAILY NUMBER –
5-5-8
BIG 4 –
7-0-4-6
QUINTO –
0-7-7-9-8
CASH 5
07-09-14-25-32
MATCH 6
02-09-15-19-25-32
PRASHANTSHITUT
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VP/Executive Editor(570) 829-7249
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VP/Chief Revenue Officer(570) 970-7203
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VP/Chief Financial Officer(570) 970-7154
auhrin@timesleader.com
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VP/HRandAdministration(570) 829-7113
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VP/Circulation(570) 970-7202
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Delivery Monday–Sunday $3.60 per weekMailed Subscriptions Monday–Sunday$4.45 per week in PA$4.85 per week outside PAPublished daily by:Impressions Media15 N. Main St.Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711Periodicals postage paid atWilkes-Barre, PA and additional mailing officesPostmaster: Send address changesto Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
+(ISSN No. 0896-4084)USPS 499-710
Issue No. 2012-167 
 WILKES-BARRE–Boardmem-bers of the Luzerne County Con- vention and Visitors Bureau areanxious to meet with the county manager next week to discuss thelocation of the bureau office andotherissues.County Manager Robert Law-ton is considering having the bu-reaumovefromitsleasedlocationat56PublicSquareinWilkes-Barretoacounty-ownedfacilitysuchasa vacant office at the county recre-ationcomplexinFortyForttosavemoney. The bureau leases office spacefrom Frank Henry and Associatesfor $16,560 annually and rentsparkingspacesforitsfouremploy-ees at a rate of $600 quarterly, ac-cordingtoanauditbycountyCon-troller Walter Griffith. The leaseexpiredinDecember2002andpay-ments have continued month-to-month. The bureau is funded largel witha20percentshareofthecoun-ty hotel tax, which netted the bu-reau$480,130inoperatingrevenuein 2011. Funding from the county general fund was cut in half last year,to$40,000.Griffith recommended the bu-reau obtain acurrentlease orcon-siderrelocatingtheofficetocoun-ty-ownedproperty.Healsorecom-mendedthebureauconsiderusing parking available at the county-ownedlotonEastMarketStreetattheMarketStreetStationcomplex. The bureau board had put off lease renewal because plans hadbeen in the works to move the of-fice to the Market Street Stationcomplex after the county redevel-opmentauthoritysecuredfunding torenovatetheformertrainstationthere. But county council nixedthat plan last month after Lawtonrecommended against spendin$2millioninfederalfundsonreno- vations.Lawtonearlierthisweeksaidthepossible relocation of the visitorsbureau and a planned swap of theassessor’s and sheriff’s offices arepart of a larger initiative to locatecompanionofficestogetherandre-duce the county’s reliance onleasedspace. The assessor-sheriff switch wasrecommended to Lawton by thecounty record improvement com-mittee, which is evaluating officelocationoptions.
Boardhasit’sownideas
 While such moves might makesense for most county offices,members of the Convention andVisitorsBureauboardbelievethereismoretoconsiderthancostwhendeterminingtheofficelocation.“Tobehonest,Idon’tknowthat you’re going to find a better placethanthecurrentlocationonPublicSquare,saidboardViceChairman TedPatton.“Asfaraswalk-intraffic,ifit’snothere, or not downtown some- where, I really don’t know wherethey could put it that would be asbeneficial to the agency. I thinktheywouldlosetheabilitytohavepeople walk in,” said Patton, vicepresident,corporatetraffic,fortheMartz Group, which is owned by theHenryfamily.At a meeting last month, boardmemberJohnMaday,membershipservices coordinator for the Grea-terWilkes-BarreChamberofBusi-ness and Industry, said he appre-ciatesbeingabletosendcorporateand other visitors to the chamberacrossPublicSquaretothebureauformaterialson recreationaloffer-ings.Board member Rob Belza saidhe thinks the current location of thebureau“isgreat.WhatplaceismoreprominentinLuzerneCoun-tythandowntownWilkes-Barre?…MostpeoplecomingintoLuzerneCounty seem to migrate to thesquare.”Belza,directorofcorporatesalesfor the Wilkes-Barre/ScrantonPenguins, said a prominent placeon Public Square is an “ultimately better”locationfortheoffice,“butif budgets are forcing people’shands,theymightneedtoconsidersomethingelse.
Location,location,location
DonnaPalermo,chairofthebu-reau’s board of directors, said any convention and visitors bureaushould be “in a central locationthat’s readily available (to touristsand other visitors) and easy tofind.”Palermo, president of the Grea-ter Hazleton Chamber of Com-merce,notedthatthebureauoncehadanannexinHazleton.“Iwouldlovetohaveanotheran-nex in our downtown. Budget- wise, I don’t know if that will hap-pen,butit’soneofthegoalsIwouldliketosee,”shesaid.BoardmemberGusGenettisaidhethinksLawtonisdoingthe“best job he can under trying circum-stances,” but he was “disappoint-ed” when Lawton advised county councilnottospendfederalmoney to refurbish the former train sta-tion.“Ihopeinthefuturethatcanbereconsidered,”saidGenetti,ownerof the Best Western Genetti Hotel&ConferenceCenteronEastMar-ket Street. But in the meantime,“Public Square is not a bad loca-tionforthebureauoffice,hesaid.Attempts to reach board mem-bersBobBorwickandKellyNova-kowskiwereunsuccessful.Boardmembershavesaidthatinadditiontodiscussingthelocationofthebureau,theyarelookingfor- ward to discussing the role of theboardofdirectors,theimportanceoftheworkofthebureauinincreas-ing tourism in the county and fos-teringeconomicdevelopment,andfinancial oversight issues broughtupinGriffith’saudit.Lawtondidnotreturnmessagesseeking comment that were left with his secretary on Wednesday andThursday.
Visitors bureauponders move
Board wants to meet withcounty manager on his idea tomove from Public Square.
BySTEVEMOCARSK
 smocarsky@timesleader.com
Visit the website of the LuzerneCounty Convention and VisitorsBureau at www.tournepa.com.
O N T H E N E T
DAY TO HONOR OLD GLORY 
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
B
oy Scout Connor Gaffney,14, and Elk members Joseph Brojakowski and Philip Kolen-dowicz change the U.S. flag outside of the Elk Lodge109 in Pringle after a Flag Dayceremony on Thursday.
Nanticoke fire displaces residents
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Firefightersfrom
severalcommunities worked quicklyWednesday to contain a fireat a double block house at63-65 W. Grove St., Nanti-coke. The rear of the struc-ture was gutted, said Nanti-coke Fire Chief Michael Bo-han. Two boys were home inthe 63 W. Grove St. side ofthe building and escapedwithout injury, said Bohan.The residents on the otherside, Richard and JenniferBonk and their child, werenot home. Bohan said atleast six or seven people aredisplaced by the fire. Thecause is under investigation.“I’ve already contacted(Pennsylvania state policefor a fire marshal),” saidBohan.
PITTSTON
--NormalgarbagepickupscheduledforJuly4willbecollectedonJuly5,thecitannounced.NormalThursdaygarbagepickupwilloccuronJuly5,andnormalFridaygarbagecollection willoccuronJuly9.However,therewillbenochangetotherecyclingcollectionnormally scheduledforThursdayorFriday.
SWOYERSVILLE
The2012realestatefacetaxperiodendsJuly5,theboroughannounced.Hoursforcollectionduringthefaceperiodwillbefrom6to7p.m.Tuesdayand9to10:30a.m.Saturday.Thetaxofficewillbeopen6to7:30p.m.July5.ThetaxofficewillbeclosedJuly15through31,andwillreopenwhenthe2012schooltaxbillsareis-sued. Thosepayingbymailandrequestingareceiptshouldsendthecompletetaxbillalongwithaself-addressedstampedenvelope.Amailslothasbeenmadeavail-ableattheboroughbuildingforthesepayments.Boroughbuild-inghoursare9a.m.to4p.m.MondaythroughFriday.Homecollectionscanbemadebycalling718-1999andleavingamessage.Propertyownerswhohavenotreceivedabillorwhohavereceivedoneinerrorshouldcallthetaxoffice.
MUNICIPAL BRIEFS
BELLEFONTE -- Sue Paterno will inherit all of her late hus-band’sproperty,accordingtothe will released by his family on Thursday.Joe Paterno’s will has beensealed in Centre County court,but the family said it’s petition-ing Centre County court tomake the documents public to“ensure maximum transparency and eliminate unfounded specu-lation.”Paterno was relieved of hiscoachingdutiesinNovemberaf-ter details emerged concerning theinvestigationofallegedchildabuse by Jerry Sandusky, Pater-no’s former defensive coordina-tor.PaternodiedinJanuaryatage85.“Atthesuggestionoftheattor-ney managing Joe Paterno’s es-tate, the family filed a motion, which the court approved, toseal the contents of his will,”DanMcGinn,thePaternofamily spokesman, said in a writtenstatement.“The request was entirely ap-propriate and totally consistent with the actions of other promi-nentindividuals.Theonlyobjec-tivewastopreserveameasureof privacy for Sue Paterno, theirfive children, 17 grandchildrenand other family members.”Intheoriginalseven-pagedoc-umentfiledin1997,JoePaternodecreed that his wife would re-ceive his “automobiles, house-hold and personal effects, andother tangible property of likenature”ifshesurvivedhimby60days. That excluded cash or se-curities, but did include any ex-isting insurance.If the 60-day condition hadnot been met, their children --DianaLynnePaterno-Giegerich,Mary Kay Hort, David Paterno,Jay Paterno and Scott Paterno -- would have shared the estate.Sue Paterno was appointed thepersonal representative of the will.McGinnsaidthePaternofam-ily “will petition the Court to re-lease the seal on all future fil-ings.”
Wife is beneficiary in Paterno will
Sue Paterno will inherit latehusband’s property. Family tomake document public.
ByCHRISROSENBLUM
Centre Daily Times
NEW YORK — If New YorkCitybansbigsodas,what’snext?Large slices of pizza? Double-scoop ice cream cones? Tubs of movie-theater popcorn? The16-ounce strip steak?Opponents of the proposedban may use that slippery-slopeargumentalongwithotherlegalstrategies to try to block thefirst-in-the-nation rule.Mayor Michael Bloomberg  wants to bar restaurants, movietheaters, sports arenas, foodcarts and delis from selling so-das and other sugary drinks inservings larger than 16 ounces,sayingitisawaytofightobesitin a city that spends billions of dollars a year on weight-relatedhealth problems. Whether that’s legal, though,isamatterofdisputeandallbutcertain to be tested.“We’re going to look at all of our options to protect our busi-ness, our rights to do businessandourrightsnottobediscrimi-nated against. We won’t takeanything off the table,saidSteve Cahillane, a senior execu-tive with Coca-Cola. The city Board of Health, ap-pointed by the mayor, is expect-ed to approve the measure aftera three-month comment period.It could take effect as early asMarch,unlessthecriticswhoac-cuse Bloomberg of instituting a“nanny state” can get the courtsor state lawmakers to step in.It’s not just businesses and in-dustry groups that could sue. Intheory, any individual affectedby the ban could bring a legalchallenge.But it wouldn’t be enough tosimply claim that the ban in-fringes on personal freedom,said Rick Hills, a New York Uni- versity law professor specializ-ing in local government law andNew York City. While Bloomberg administra-tion officials say they have noplans to move against solidfoods, any local governmentcouldbanredmeat—orevenallanimal products — without vio-lating a person’s right to life, lib-erty and the pursuit of happi-ness, Hills argued.
NYC’s big-soda ban could face legal test
Opponents of the proposedban may use slippery-slopeargument, ask ‘What’s next?’
BySAMANTHAGROSS 
 Associated Press
 
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com FRIDAY, JUNE 15, 2012 PAGE 3A
L
OCAL
timesleader.com
SCRANTON
‘U’ grads win Fulbrights
F
our University of Scranton grad-uates have been awarded Ful-bright U.S. Student Program schol-arships for the 2012-13 academic year.Members of theuniversity’s class of 2012 earning Ful-bright scholarshipsare: Ellen Coyne of Stony Point, N.Y., who won a Ful-bright English Teaching Assist-antship to South Korea, and Kath-leen Lavelle of Avoca, who won aFulbright Teaching Assistantship toSpain.In addition, Anna DiColli, a gradu-ate of the university’s class of 2010from Broomall, was awarded a Ful-bright Scholarship in Public Healthto Spain. Class of 2010 graduate C.J.Libassi, a native of Dalton now resid-ing in Washington, D.C., won a Ful-bright Teaching Assistantship toSpain. The scholarships were announcedrecently by the U.S. Department of State and the J. William FulbrightForeign Scholarship Board. Thefour were selected from a pool of more than 9,000 applicants.Lavelle graduated from ScrantonPreparatory School and Libassigraduated from Wyoming Seminary.
 WILKES-BARRE/SCRANTON
PPL rate hearings set
 The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission has scheduled a publicinput hearing to accept public com-ment on PPL Electric Utilities’proposed 2.9 percent rate increase. The rate hike amounts to an in-crease in revenue of $104.6 millionfor the utility. The hearings are on Monday at 2p.m. in the Scranton State OfficeBuilding, Room 318,100 Lackawan-na Ave., Scranton; and at 6 p.m. atKing’s College, Burke Auditorium,133 N. River St., Wilkes-Barre.
HANOVER TWP.
Grilling demo at Dundee
Dundee Gardens will host a freegrilling demonstration with DavidPembleton, a local chef, on Saturday from11a.m. to 3 p.m. at 2407 SanSouci Parkway, Hanover Township.Pembleton will offer grilling tech-niques, tips and recipes during thedemonstration. Attendees will enjoy free samples of his delicious, grilledfood.For information regarding this freepublic event, call Dundee Gardens,570-735-5452.
SUGARLOAF TWP.
‘Parents’ to celebrate
Concerned Parents of the HazletonArea is inviting the public to helpcelebrate the organization’s fourthanniversary from 2 to 4 p.m. Sat-urday at the Slusser-Bayzick Building on the Penn State Hazleton campus. The organization was formed in2008 to serve as a bridge betweenteachers, students and parents toimprove communication and under-standing. Concerned Parents willpresent its Humanitarian Award andits Eugenio A. Sosa Community Service Award at the event.
HAZLETON
Hospital wins certification
Hazleton General Hospital wasawarded Primary Stroke Certifica-tion from the Healthcare FacilitiesAccreditation Program, an independ-ent accreditation organization recog-nized by the Centers for Medicareand Medicaid Services for the fifth year in a row, after a review of thehospital’s quality and safety stan-dards by the HFAP.“Hazleton General Hospital clearly demonstrates a commitment toquality patient care,” said MichaelZarski, CEO of HFAP. “We base ourdecision on federal standards, as wellas recognized national standards forpatient safety, quality improvementand environmental safety. HazletonGeneral Hospital met or exceededstandards in every case.”HFAP accreditation is recognizedby the federal government, stategovernments, managed care orga-nizations and insurance companies.For more information, go to www.hfap.org.
NEWS IN BRIEF
Lavelle
SCRANTONThenationalaccrediting body for medical schools has lifted TheCommonwealth Medical College fromprobation, a move that puts the schoolbackontracktowardreceivingfullaccred-itation. The Liaison Committee on MedicalEducation, which accredits medicalschools in the United States, placed theschoolonprobationlastsummerduetofi-nancialdifficultiesandundertookareviewoftheschool. Whilethatwenton,thecollegewasabletoadmitonly65medicaldegreestudentsin each class. With probation lifted, thenumberwillgrowto100. The medical college, which opened inAugust2009,announcedlayoffslastyear--citing financial problems stemming fromthe$4milliondropinstatefunding,thees-timated $120 million cost of the school’spermanent building that opened last fallandadropindonations.As the school worked out cost-cutting moves, it also tried to work out an affilia-tion agreement with The University of Scranton. The two sides scrapped affiliation talkslast month, but TCMC spokeswomanAnneGreenesaiddiscussionsareongoin with other schools, health care systemsand hospitals about potential affiliations.She declined to identify those entities,thoughbothlocalhealthcaregiants,Geis-ingerandCommonwealthHealthhavede-niedthey’reinvolvedindiscussions.Afteravigorousanalysisofanextensivedatabase,TCMC’sinstitutionalself-study,astudentsurveyandthreedaysofon-the-ground inspection, the committee con-cluded TCMC had made progress to re-movetheprobationstatusandadvancetheschool to provisional accreditation, thenextstepinthefullaccreditationprocess,theschoolannounced.. The probation did not change the “pre-liminaryaccreditationtheschoolearned,butdiddelaythestepstofullaccreditation. Theschoolisnowbackonthatpathwith-outahugehurdleinitsway.Inaletterannouncingthechangeinsta-tus to TCMC staff and students, InterimPresident and Dean Louis Margaret Norasaid “We are moving forward with hiring additional faculty members. The searchfor the permanent CEO/Dean is well un-derway.”Nora took over the school’s top post af-ter the college’s inaugural president anddean, Robert D’Alessandri, abruptly re-signed in April 2011with no reason giventothepublic.Noraannouncedshetoowillbeleaving bymonth’sendtoacceptapositioninChi-cago. The college’s board of trustees an-nounced recently that Dr. Robert E. Wright will succeed Nora beginning June29andwillserveinthispositionuntilaper-manent CEO/dean is named through anongoingnationalsearch.
Medical school’s probation lifted
The Commonwealth Medical Collegewas on list for financial difficulties.
ByANDREWM.SEDER 
 aseder@timesleader.com
EXETER – A number of local residentsfilled the auditorium at Wyoming AreaHigh School on Thursday for a presenta-tion by West Pittston Tomorrow, a citi-zen’sactiongroupthat’sproposinganum-ber of innovative changes for the flood-ravaged community. The group, which states its mission for West Pittston as “Preserving Yesterday.Rebuilding Today. Sculpting Tomorrow,”outlinedanumberofproposals,includina program to attract new business, asmall-business support initiative and anextensive road and sidewalk renovationproject, as well as plans for a community center and library.“I was born and raised in West Pitt-ston,” said group Chairwoman Judy Aita.“Iwanttohelpcreateavibrantrevitalizedcommunity that everyone can be proudof.” The centerpiece of West Pittston To-morrow’s agenda is a proposed levee sys-tem along the Susquehanna River in theflood-proneboroughthatwillprotectres-identsfromfutureinundationfromrising  water. Theboroughnotprotectedbytheleveesystem that helped prevent extensivedamage to many other Wyoming Valley communities in the historic 2011 flood-ing, which damaged more than 800homes and business in the borough.Group officials said they plan to ap-proach the Army Corps of Engineers tocommission a “levee feasibility study”thatwilldeterminewhetherfederalfund-ingthroughtheCorpswillbeavailableforthe proposed project. The proposed1.5 mile levee would runalongSusquehannaAvenue,anddifferentengineering analyses put the total cost atbetween $7 million and $18 million.“Once the feasibility study is done, we’ll get a better handle on actual costs,”said Infrastructure Committee memberSamPolit.“Wehavedonealotofprelimi-nary work on this already. We feel confi-dent that we will be successful in getting the funding we need for the levee.”Aita stated Army Corps officials toldherto“plan,notdo,”aspartofthegroup’spreparation for federal grant money.“Thorough planning is vital to thisprocess,saidAita.“Assoonastomorrow, we plan to approach private and statesources for possible funding. We will ex-haust all avenues.” The group plans to restore the “walk-ability” of the community by restoring the water-torn sidewalks and creating ariverside museum with an observationdeck overlooking the Susquehanna.
DONCAREY/THETIMESLEADER
Judy Aita, chairman of the West Pittston Tomorrow project, speaks to a small gathering at Wyoming Area High School whowere there Thursday to see the long-term flood recovery program plan.
W. Pittston group looks ahead
Group wants to see levee systemalong with other improvements.
BySTEVENFONDO
Times Leader Correspondent
NANTICOKE Everyonelovesaparade,andtheWyoming Valley is getting a new one. The South Valley Chamber of Commerce announced Thursday it will host its inaugural SouthValley Patriots Day Parade onSunday, July 15, in Nanticoke.Planned as an annual event, thechamber’s25membermunicipal-ities will take turns hosting theparade in subsequent years. Theparadeisdedicatedtoareapatriots,agroupthechamberde-fines broadly.Jerry Hudak, president of theSouth Valley Chamber, said theparadewillhonortheservicenotonly of America’s armed forces,but of municipal emergency re-sponders as well.“Wewanttoshowtheapprecia-tion of The South Valley Cham-ber of Commerce for these du-ties, and for those who have fall-en in those duties,” Hudak said.Chamber Executive DirectorChristopher Carey added to thatlist business owners, municipalleaders and “everyone down tothepersonwhocutsthegrass;ev-eryone who does their duty tomake their community better.” The parade begins at 11 a.m.,though activities on and aroundNanticoke’sPatriotParkwillcon-tinue from10 a.m. until 9 p.m.Starting near Greater Nanti-coke Area High School, the pa-rade will proceed up East GreenStreet, turn right onto SouthMarketStreet,turnrightagainatEast Main Street and end at theintersection of East Main Streetand Kosciuszko Street.Organizers said veterans of  World War II, Korea, Vietnam,Iraq and Afghanistan will marchalong with area emergency re-sponders.Events around Patriot Park will include food vendors, infor-mational booths from chamberbusinesses and community orga-nizations, live music and deejaysand children’s activities, includ-ing face-painting, balloon ani-mals, clowns and an inflatablebounce house. Several ceremo-nies will also be held throughoutthe day, including a flag-raising ceremony and tolling of the firebell for fallen firefighters.Hudaksaidthechamberhopesto provide a public entertain-ment option in an era when suchofferings are becoming less com-mon.“Thefactofthematteristhata
Paradeto honorall thosewho serve
South Valley Patriots DayParade will be held July 15 inNanticoke.
ByMATTHUGHES 
 mhughes@timesleader.com
See PARADE, Page 8A
KINGSTONTWP.--Moderntechnologyandagelessphilan-thropy gave a 19th-centurstructure a new lease on life at The Lands at Hillside Farms.Board by board, the timber-framed barn, donated by theMaslow family, was brokendown, relocated and restoredas the Mercantile barn at thenonprofit educational dairfarm.“We don’t remodel -- we re-store.Wewanttogetitbackasit was,” Hillside developmentdirector Suzanne Kelly said Thursdayattheribboncutting to commemorate the restora-tion.Part of a $500,000 stategrant was used mostly to re-store the Mercantile, now ageneral store where patronscanpurchaseproductsranginfrom home décor to children’sgames and puzzles. These are all, “items that were made on farms, itemsthat were made locally anditems made in America,” saidKelly. The products are examplesto highlight the importance of sustainability and a “Buy Lo-cal/Buy Americaninitiative,Kelly and Hillside ExecutiveDirector Chet Mozloom said.“Tobesustainable,youneedto be able to take care of your-self,”Kellysaid.AndHillsideispracticing what is beinpreached, right down to thehandcrafted wild blueberry  jam samples from Maine.“We understand all the jobsand products are going over-seasandit’sputtingbusinessesout of business. … Support your neighbor, support thesmall business, support those who are working very hard toearn a living,” she added.Mozloom also pointed outtherecentrestorationofgreen-houses and the old farmer’shouse into an administrationbuilding, made possible by thegrant money. Both contributeto additional jobs and volun-teerworkonthe412-acrefarm.StateSen.LisaBaker,R-Leh-man Township, who obtainedthe state grant, also spoke atthe ceremony.
Mercantile barn at Hillside Farms restored
The 19th-century structureat The Lands is now ageneral store.
ByNODYIAFEDRICK 
Times Leader Intern
BILLTARUTIS/FORTHETIMESLEADER
Shoppers look over items at the grand opening of HillsideMercantile at the Lands at Hillside Farms in Kingston Town-ship on Thursday morning.

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