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KTI untuk UMT 2

KTI untuk UMT 2

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Published by: s_afandi04 on Jun 15, 2012
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10/18/2013

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ENGLISH TEACHER’S PERCEPTION ON THE IMPORTANCE
OF PRAGMATIC COMPETENCE IN INDONESIANEFL CLASSROOM
 
BySAEPUL APANDI
 
NIDN : 04113127703
 
UNIVERSITAS MUHAMMADIYAH TANGERANG
 
2010
 
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ENGLISH TEACHER’S PERCEPTION ON THE IMPORTANCE
OF PRAGMATIC COMPETENCE IN INDONESIANEFL CLASSROOM
 
A.
 
Introduction
This research will highlight the perception of Indonesian experiencedEnglish teachers upon the importance of pragmatic competence in IndonesianEFL classroom setting. The underlying assumption of this research is thatIndonesian English teachers in general frequently ignore cultural aspect of English as the target language being taught in the classroom. This sort of ignorance undoubtedly brings about inappropriate use of language. In otherwords, Indonesian English teachers do not posses appropriate pragmaticcompetence. This research, as its title suggests, attempts to investigate howEnglish teachers perceive the cultural norms in English language teaching and
its relevance towards the development of students‟ pragmatic competence.
 English language educators across Indonesia (also across the globe)agree that the sole aim of English language teaching (also other foreignlanguage teaching) is to equip students as language learner with languageknowledge that will enable them to engage in communication in the targetlanguage. For many years, the main objective of studies on the learning of English as a second language was to analyze linguistic competence. The mainreason for this was the teaching methodology used, in which grammar wascentral to learning. But for some years now, the communicative approach to
 
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second-language learning has put grammar-centered classes to one side andfostered the use of pragmatics.The traditional approach towards English language teaching in
Indonesia was heavily emphasized on the development of students‟ mastery
on perceptive grammar. This kind of approach is believed to be less effective
in promoting students‟
communicative competence. The new vision oncommunicative competence in second-language learning has led manyresearchers to define (for redefine) terms such as pragmatic competence,communicative competence or interlanguage. Many of these researchers haveconsidered that pragmatic competence, as well as communicative
competence, can be defined as the learner‟s ability to put into practice the
knowledge that he/she has of the target language in order to expressintensions, feelings, etc, and interpret those of the speakers.
The term “communicative competence” was first coined by DelHymes in 1972 to refer to learner‟s ability to adapt language to communicatewith other people (Cook, 1993). Chomsky prefers to the term as “pragmaticcompetence” to refer to th
e ability to know how language relates to situationfor any purpose the speakers intend (Chomsky 1980 in Cook 1993).Language educators across the globe agree that to learn (also to acquire) asecond language requires more than a mastery of vocabulary, phonologicaland syntactical knowledge. A complete mastery of second languageabsolutely involves pragmatic competence
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knowing how to use itappropriately. This competence definitely requires a second language learner

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