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A Star Tower Hanoi

A Star Tower Hanoi

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11/05/2012

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Articial Intelligence Spring 2005Professor Greenwald Lecture #4
Heuristic Search on Graphs
1A tree is a special case of a graph in which there is exactly one path to everynode. Indeed an arbitrary graph can contain multiple paths to any given node.To extend heuristic search algorithms designed for trees to graphs, we maintaina
closed 
list of nodes already visited, in addition to the open list of nodes yetto be visited. In best-
h
search, nodes are inserted into the open list as theyare encountered, if they are not yet on either the open or the closed lists. Inaddition, in best-
g
search, nodes on the open list are promoted if they are re-encountered with lower priority. In addition, in A
search, nodes on the closedlist are re-opened if they are re-encountered with lower priority.
Best-
h
Search on Graphs
It is straightforward to extend best-
h
search tographs: we maintain a closed list and do not open any nodes that already appearon either the open list or the closed list. Since the heuristic
h
is a function (i.e.,each node’s value is unique), nodes are never re-encountered with lower priority.Thus, open nodes need not ever be promoted and closed nodes need not be re-inserted into the open list. The best-
h
search algorithm for graphs is depictedin Table 1.
Best-
g
Search on Graphs
The best-
g
search algorithm is outlined in Table 2.Like best-
h
search, best-
g
search maintains a closed list and never re-opens anynodes on this list: since nodes are visited in priority order, closed nodes can neverbe re-encountered with lower priority. But open nodes could be re-encounteredwith lower priority, since there can be multiple paths to a single node in a graph.Best-
g
search
promotes
nodes on the open list if ever they are re-encounteredwith lower priority.
A
Search on Graphs
Table 3 describes A
search through arbitrary graphs.Like best-
g
search, A
search on graphs promotes nodes on the open list when-ever such nodes are re-encountered with lower priority. In addition, A
searchon graphs maintains a closed list and re-opens nodes on this list if ever they areare re-encountered with lower priority. How can closed nodes be re-encounteredwith lower priority? Recall that A
search is guided by the evaluation func-tion
=
g
+
h
: i.e., nodes are visited in
roughly 
-order. Unlike in best-
g
search, where nodes are visited in
g
-order, a closed node in A
search can bere-encountered with lower a
g
-value, and thus a lower priority
than its priorityduring any previous encounters.
1
Copyrightc
Amy Greenwald, 2001–05
1
 
Best-
h
(
X,S,G,δ,c,h
)Inputs search problemheuristic function
h
Output (path to) optimal goal nodeInitialize
O
=
is the list of open nodes
=
is the list of closed nodes
while
(
O
is not empty)
do
1. delete node
n
O
s.t.
h
(
n
) is minimal2. if 
n
G
, return (path to)
n
3. for all
m
δ
(
n
)(a) compute
h
(
m
)(b) if 
m
and
m
O
i. insert
m
into
O
with priority
h
(
m
) =
h
(
m
)4. insert
n
into
fail
Table 1: Best-
h
Search on Graphs.
1 Optimality
A heuristic function
h
is called
monotone
at node
n
iff 
h
(
n
)
c
(
n,m
) +
h
(
m
)for all successor nodes
m
δ
(
n
). A heuristic function
h
is said to be
consistent 
iff (i) it is monotone at all non-goal nodes, and (ii) it is zero at all goal nodes.
Lemma
If 
h
is consistent, then
is monotonically, nondecreasing in depth:i.e., for all
n
, for all
m
δ
(
n
),
(
m
)
(
n
).
Proof 
Note that
g
(and therefore
) is not a function. For each value of 
g
(
n
),
(
n
) =
g
(
n
) +
h
(
n
)=
g
(
m
)
c
(
n,m
) +
h
(
n
)
g
(
m
) +
h
(
m
)=
(
m
)
Theorem
A
search on graphs with a consistent heuristic is optimal.2
 
Best-
g
(
X,S,G,δ,c
)Inputs search problemOutput (path to) optimal goal nodeInitialize
O
=
is the list of open nodes
=
is the list of closed nodes
while
(
O
is not empty)
do
1. delete node
n
O
s.t.
g
(
n
) is minimal2. if 
n
G
, return (path to)
n
3. for all
m
δ
(
n
)(a)
g
(
m
) =
g
(
n
) +
c
(
m,n
)(b) if 
m
and
m
O
i. insert
m
into
O
with priority
g
(
m
) =
g
(
m
)else if 
m
O
and
g
(
m
)
< g
(
m
)i. promote
m
in
O
to priority
g
(
m
) =
g
(
m
)4. insert
n
into
fail
Table 2: Best-
g
Search on Graphs.
2 Examples
A sample graph appears in Figure 1. The start state is
and the unique goalnode is
G
, but there are two paths to this goal node:
SACG
and
SBCG
.
Best-
h
Search
Best-
h
search maintains the following sequence of priorityqueues in its search through this graph:
0
,
A
1
B
2
,
0
B
2
,
G
0
B
2
,
goal
! Thepath returned is suboptimal:
SACG
.
Best-
g
Search
Best-
g
search maintains the following sequence of priorityqueues in its search through this graph:
0
,
A
1
B
5
,
B
5
21
,
10
,
G
10
,
goal
!The path returned is optimal:
SBCG
.Best-
g
search first encounters node
via node
A
, traversing a path of cost 21.Later, it encounters node
again via node
B
, traversing a path of cost only 10.At this point, node
’s priority is promoted from 21 to 10.3

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