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75338464-De-Stijl

75338464-De-Stijl

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Published by: Ina Alexandra on Jun 19, 2012
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De Stijl
Neoplasticism
 
Contents
Articles
Overview
1
De Stijl1
Artists directly associated with De Stijl
6
Theo van Doesburg6Bart van der Leck11Robert van 't Hoff12Vilmos Huszár16Piet Mondrian17J. J. P. Oud27Gerrit Rietveld30Georges Vantongerloo33Jan Wils34
Artists strongly influenced by De Stijl
36
Ilya Bolotowsky36Burgoyne Diller38César Domela39Friedrich Vordemberge-Gildewart40
Works
42
Red and Blue Chair42Rietveld Schröder House44Broadway Boogie-Woogie47Victory Boogie-Woogie48
References
Article Sources and Contributors49Image Sources, Licenses and Contributors51
Article Licenses
License53
 
1
Overview
De Stijl
 Red and Blue Chair 
designed by Gerrit Rietveld in1917
De Stijl
(
Dutch pronunciation:
[d
ə ˈ
st
ɛɪ
l], (
Dutch pronunciation:
[d
ɛ ˈ
sti
ː
l],
English:
 /d
ə ˈ
sta
ɪ
l/), Dutch for "The Style", also known as
neoplasticism
, was a Dutch artistic movement founded in 1917. Ina narrower sense, the term
 De Stijl
is used to refer to a body of work from 1917 to 1931 founded in the Netherlands.
[1]
 
[2]
 
 De Stijl
is also the name of a journal that was published by the Dutchpainter, designer, writer, and critic Theo van Doesburg(1883
 –
1931), propagating the group's theories. Next to vanDoesburg, the group's principal members were the painters PietMondrian (1872
 –
1944), Vilmos Huszár (1884
 –
1960), and Bartvan der Leck (1876
 –
1958), and the architects Gerrit Rietveld(1888
 –
1964), Robert van 't Hoff (1887
 –
1979), and J.J.P. Oud(1890
 –
1963). The artistic philosophy that formed a basis for thegroup's work is known as
neoplasticism
 
 —
the new plastic art (or
 Nieuwe Beelding
in Dutch).Proponents of De Stijl sought to express a new utopian ideal of spiritual harmony and order. They advocated pure abstraction anduniversality by a reduction to the essentials of form and colour;they simplified visual compositions to the vertical and horizontaldirections, and used only primary colors along with black andwhite. Indeed, according to the Tate Gallery's online article onneoplasticism, Mondrian himself sets forth these delimitations in his essay 'Neo-Plasticism in Pictorial Art'. Hewrites, "... this new plastic idea will ignore the particulars of appearance, that is to say, natural form and colour. Onthe contrary, it should find its expression in the abstraction of form and colour, that is to say, in the straight line andthe clearly defined primary colour." The Tate article further summarizes that this art allows "only primary coloursand non-colours, only squares and rectangles, only straight and horizontal or vertical line."
[3]
The GuggenheimMuseum's online article on De Stijl summarizes these traits in similar terms: "It [De Stijl] was posited on thefundamental principle of the geometry of the straight line, the square, and the rectangle, combined with a strongasymmetricality; the predominant use of pure primary colors with black and white; and the relationship betweenpositive and negative elements in an arrangement of non-objective forms and lines."
[4]
Principles and influences
The name DeStijlis supposedly derived from Gottfried Semper's
 Der Stil in den technischen und tektonischen Künsten oder Praktische Ästhetik 
(1861
 –
3), which Curl
[2]
suggests was mistakenly believed to advocate materialismand functionalism. In general, De Stijl proposed ultimate simplicity and abstraction, both in architecture andpainting, by using only straight horizontal and vertical lines and rectangular forms. Furthermore, their formalvocabulary was limited to the primary colours, red, yellow, and blue, and the three primary values, black, white, andgrey. The works avoided symmetry and attained aesthetic balance by the use of opposition. This element of the

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