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pc_2012_11__01

pc_2012_11__01

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ISSUE 2012/11JUNE 2012
COMPOSITIONAL EFFECTSON PRODUCTIVITY, LABOURCOST AND EXPORTADJUSTMENTS
ZSOLT DARVAS
Highlights
Sectoral shifts, such as shrinkage of low labour productivity and the low-wageconstruction sector, can lead to apparent increased aggregate average labour pro-ductivity and average wages, especially when capital intensity differs across sectors.For 11 main sectors and 13 manufacturing sub-sectors, we quantify thecompositional effects on productivity, wages and unit labour costs (ULCs) basedand real effective exchange rates (REER), for 24 EU countries.Compositional effects are greatest in Ireland, where the pharmaceutical sectordrives the growth of output and productivity, but other sectors have sufferedgreatly and have not yet recovered.Our new ULC-REER measurements, which are free from compositional effects,correlate well with export performance.Among the countries facing the most severe external adjustment challenges,Lithuania, Portugal and Ireland have been the most successful based on fiveindicators, and Latvia, Estonia and Greece the least successful.There is evidence of downward wage flexibility in some countries, but wage cutshave corrected just a small fraction of pre-crisis wage rises and came with massivereductions in employment even in the business sector excluding construction andreal estate, highlighting the difficulty of adjusting wages downward.
Zsolt Darvas
(zsolt.darvas@bruegel.org) is a Research Fellow at Bruegel. Thanks aredue to Dana Andreicut for excellent research assistance, Guntram Wolff for comments,and Alan Ahearne, Derry O’Brien, Fergal O’Brien and Philip Lane for valuable insightsinto the interpretation of Irish developments.
Telephone
+32 2 227 4210info@bruegel.org
www.bruegel.org
BRUEGEL
POLICY
CONTRIBUTION
 
COMPOSITIONAL EFFECTS ON PRODUCTIVITY,LABOUR COST AND EXPORT ADJUSTMENTS
ZSOLT DARVAS, JUNE 2012
02
BRUEGEL
POLICY
CONTRIBUTION
1. In addition to composi-tional changes in varioussectors, many other compo-sitional changes can alsooccur. For example, if a firmhires young employees,then the average wage atthe firm, as well as averagelabour productivity, candecline. In our paper weonly consider the impactsof compositional changesresulting from changes inthe composition of sectors.
IN COUNTRIES FACING SEVERE MACROECONOMICADJUSTMENTS,
domestic demand is typicallyconstrained by fiscal adjustments, deleveragingof the private sector and limited credit supply.Under such circumstances exports should play amajor role in the adjustment process. Thisnecessitates improvements in competitiveness,which was generally lost during the good yearsbefore the crisis in those countries that face themost severe adjustment challenges.Competitiveness could be improved through priceand non-price factors. The main tools to improvenon-price competitiveness are structural reforms,education, innovation and corporate governanceimprovements. Such improvements are indispen-sable in most countries, but take time.Price (or cost) competitiveness can be improvedthrough a depreciation of the real effectiveexchange rate (REER), which is usually measuredby the unit labour cost (ULC) based REER. In turn,REER depreciation can occur through productivityimprovements, nominal wage reductions, nominaleffective exchange rate (NEER) depreciations andthe ULC increases of trading partners. Domesticpolicymakers have no impact on the last item, anda severely limited one, if any, on the NEER. There-fore, productivity and the nominal wage shouldplay a crucial role in the adjustment. Indeed, insome countries, such as Ireland, significant pro-ductivity improvements have occurred since theonset of the crisis, though average wage reduc-tions were limited. The Irish ULC-REER, as meas-ured by Eurostat against 36 trading partners,depreciated by 19 percent from 2008Q1 to2011Q4, and by 17 percent against euro-areapartners, which is influenced only by wage andproductivity developments but not the nominalexchange rate.However, based on Central Bank of Ireland (2011),Krugman (2011) has highlighted that composi-tional changes may lie behind the fall in Irish unitlabour costs. The Central Bank of Ireland's (2011)calculation indicated that about half of the declinein the Irish business sector average ULC relativeto trading partners was related to compositionalchanges. The reason for this is that if, for example,low-wage and low-productivity construction work-ers are laid off in large numbers while high-pro-ductivity manufacturing workers keep their jobs,then both average wage and average productivitygo up, even if there is no wage increase or pro-ductivity gain in any individual sector. With regardto ULC, the impact of compositional changes onproductivity and wages can offset each other, yetCentral Bank of Ireland (2011) found that theoverall impact of compositional changes on IrishULC was sizeable. This may relate to the very highcapital intensity of certain Irish manufacturingsub-sectors.While such compositional changes may blur theassessment of the genuine improvement incompetitiveness, such changes are not ‘bad’
 perse
. For example, it is a benign development if high-productivity sectors grow faster thanlow-productivity sectors. But quantifying thesecompositional changes is crucial for assessing theadjustment that countries have achieved sincethe onset of the crisis and so that lessons fromsuccessful adjustments can be learned.In this Policy Contribution, we assess theimportance of the impact of sectoral changes onaverage labour productivity considering 11 mainsectors and 13 manufacturing sub-sectors
1
, inorder to:Quantify the compositional effect on measuredaverage productivity, average hourly labourcompensation, unit labour costs and ULC-REERs;Calculate a new measure of ULC-REER, which isfree from compositional effects, for the
COMPOSITIONAL EFFECTS
Zsolt Darvas
 
business sector excluding construction, realestate activities and agriculture;Calculate a new measure of ULC-REER forcertain sectors, such as manufacturing;Relate export performance since the onset of the crisis to various measures of REER;Study the components of the ULC-REER andrank countries according to their success inadjusting.We include 24 EU countries (Cyprus, Luxembourgand Malta are excluded due to missing data) forthe period 2000Q1-2011Q4, although sectoraldata for Romania is available only since 2008Q1.In the next section we use the example of Irelandto describe our methodology, followed, in the thirdsection, by the assessment of the compositionaleffect on average productivity, average hourlylabour costs, and ULC-based REER for all countriesin the sample. In the fourth section, we assess the
03
BRUEGEL
POLICY
CONTRIBUTION
relationship between export performance andREERs. This is followed in the fifth section by thestudy of the components of ULC-REER changes,and a ranking of the countries according to theirsuccess in adjusting. Finally, we briefly conclude.The background paper to this publication (Darvas,2012b) discusses the methodology and datasources in more detail and presents results for all24 EU countries that we consider. The ULC-basedREERs calculated in this paper are added to thedataset of Darvas (2012a), which is available athttp://www.bruegel.org/publications/publication-detail/publication/716-real-effective-exchange-rates-for-178-countries-a-new-database/andwill be irregularly updated.
THE IRISH EXAMPLE
We use data on 11 main sectors of the economyand 13 manufacturing sub-sectors (Tables 1 and2). In addition to the total economy, we consider
CodeBusinesssector w.o.A.C.R.DescriptionEU27Ireland
    G    V    A   s    h   a   r   e     (    %   o    f    t   o    t   a    l     )    E   m   p    l   o   y   m   e   n    t   s    h   a   r   e     (    %   o    f    t   o    t   a    l     )    G    V    A    /   e   m   p    l   y   o   e   e     (    €    0    0    0   s   p   e   r   y   e   a   r     )    L   a    b   o   u   r   c   o   m   p .    /   e   m   p    l   o   y   e   e     (    €    0    0    0   s   p   e   r   y   e   a   r     )    G    V    A   s    h   a   r   e     (    %   o    f    t   o    t   a    l     )    E   m   p    l   o   y   m   e   n    t   s    h   a   r   e     (    %   o    f    t   o    t   a    l     )    G    V    A    /   e   m   p    l   y   o   e   e     (    €    0    0    0   s   p   e   r   y   e   a   r     )    L   a    b   o   u   r   c   o   m   p .    /   e   m   p    l   o   y   e   e     (    €    0    0    0   s   p   e   r   y   e   a   r     )
A
Agriculture, forestry and fishing
1.75.41541.74.6296C X
Manufacturing
15.014.4583225.811.517240B,D,E X
Industry ex. manufacturing, construction
3.91.6122382.31.710546F
Construction
6.47.144243.26.53734G-I X
Wholesale and retail trade, transport, acco-modation and food service activities
19.124.3392214.826.24329J X
Information and communication
4.72.784452.63.05046K X
Financial and insurance
5.82.71045510.45.015965L
Real estate
10.60.0525247.80.5116827M-N X
Professional, scientific and technical activi-ties; administrative and support services
9.911.343268.78.77730O-Q
Public administration, defence, education,human health and social work activities
19.523.3413320.226.35950R-U X
Arts, entertainment, recreation; other serv-ices; activities of households and extra-terri-torial organisations and bodies
3.56.228172.55.03825
Total (All NACE activities)
100.0100.04927100.0100.07638
Table 1: The 11 main sectors and their 2010 shares, labour productivity and compensation
Note: Business sector w.o. A.C.R. = Business sector excluding agriculture, construction and real estate activities. The category ‘Other industry: Industry exceptmanufacturing and construction’ is calculated by us by subtracting ‘Manufacturing’ from ‘Industry (except construction)’, for which data is directly availablefrom Eurostat and therefore this is the aggregate of B: Mining and quarrying; D: Electricity, gas, steam and air conditioning supply; and E: Water supply, sew-erage, waste management and remediation. The shares in gross value added (GVA) were calculated on the basis of current price values. Total labour com-pensation is reported, which consists of: (a) gross wages and salaries paid in cash; (b) direct remuneration (pay) and bonuses; and (c) wages and salariesin kind (housing, company cars, meal vouchers, etc).
Zsolt Darvas
COMPOSITIONAL EFFECTS

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