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Hitler - Second book / Zweites buch

Hitler - Second book / Zweites buch

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Published by WBorghuis
The Zweites Buch (German, "Second Book") is an unedited transcript of Adolf Hitler's thoughts on foreign policy written in 1928; it was written after Mein Kampf and was not published in his lifetime. / After the Nazi Party's poor showing in the 1928 elections, Hitler decided that the public did not fully understand his ideas. He retired to Munich and began dictating a sequel to Mein Kampf focusing on foreign policy, expanding on that book's ideas.

The origins of Zweites Buch can be traced back to one of the main issues during the 1928 Reichstag elections, the condition of ethnic Germans in Italy.

In the area of South Tyrol, the Southern part of the former Austrian County of Tyrol which had become part of Italy after World War I, but possessed a German-speaking majority, Benito Mussolini's Fascist government had followed a policy of forcible Italianization of the German-speaking majority, a policy widely opposed in Germany. During the 1928 Reichstag elections, the leader of the German People's Party—Foreign Minister Gustav Stresemann—felt that taking a strong diplomatic stand against the Italianization policies of Fascist Italy might improve his party's chances at the polls. Indeed, every German political party—except the Nazi Party—followed Stresemann's lead and vied with each other to offer the strongest possible condemnation of Mussolini's treatment of Italy's German minority.

Hitler publicly stated that Germany needed Italy as an ally, and thus the German government should remain silent about the Tyrol issue. Hitler was roundly condemned by every other German political party for his views about the Tyrol issue; even many of the other Nazi leaders were uncomfortable with Hitler's stance. Hitler wrote Zweites Buch initially to explain why he felt that Germany should not champion Tyrol's German population. Hitler considered Mussolini one of the world's great statesmen, and was willing to abandon Tyrol's German population to forge an alliance with him.

Moreover, Hitler attacked Stresemann for his goal of restoring Germany to its pre-1914 position. In Hitler's view, merely overthrowing the Treaty of Versailles and restoring Germany to its pre-1914 borders was only a temporary solution. In Zweites Buch, Hitler stated his belief that Germany's real problem was the lack of sufficient Lebensraum ("Living space") for the German people. In Hitler's view, only states with large amounts of Lebensraum were successful. In Zweites Buch, Hitler announced that overthrowing the "shackles" of Versailles would be only the first step in a Nazi foreign policy, whose ultimate objective was to obtain the desired Lebensraum in the territory of Russia.
Discovery

Only two copies of the original 200-page manuscript were made, and only one of these copies has ever been made public. Zweites Buch was not published in 1928 as Mein Kampf was not selling well, and Hitler's publisher informed him that having two books out would depress sales even further. By the time Mein Kampf started to sell well after the September 1930 Reichstag elections, Hitler decided that Zweites Buch revealed too much of his foreign policy goals. Kept strictly secret under Hitler's orders, the document was placed in a safe inside an air raid shelter in 1935, where it remained until its discovery by an American officer in 1945. The authenticity of the book was verified by Josef Berg—a former employee of the Nazi publishing house Eher Verlag—and by Telford Taylor, the former Brigadier General U.S.A.R. and Chief Counsel at the Nuremberg war-crimes trials. The book was neither edited nor published during the Nazi Germany era and remains known as Zweites Buch (lit. "Second Book"). The Zweites Buch was first discovered in the Nazi archives being held in the U.S. by the German-born Jewish American historian Gerhard Weinberg in 1958. Unable to find an American publisher, Weinberg turned to his Jewish mentor Hans Rothfels and his associate Martin Broszat at the Institute of Contemporary
The Zweites Buch (German, "Second Book") is an unedited transcript of Adolf Hitler's thoughts on foreign policy written in 1928; it was written after Mein Kampf and was not published in his lifetime. / After the Nazi Party's poor showing in the 1928 elections, Hitler decided that the public did not fully understand his ideas. He retired to Munich and began dictating a sequel to Mein Kampf focusing on foreign policy, expanding on that book's ideas.

The origins of Zweites Buch can be traced back to one of the main issues during the 1928 Reichstag elections, the condition of ethnic Germans in Italy.

In the area of South Tyrol, the Southern part of the former Austrian County of Tyrol which had become part of Italy after World War I, but possessed a German-speaking majority, Benito Mussolini's Fascist government had followed a policy of forcible Italianization of the German-speaking majority, a policy widely opposed in Germany. During the 1928 Reichstag elections, the leader of the German People's Party—Foreign Minister Gustav Stresemann—felt that taking a strong diplomatic stand against the Italianization policies of Fascist Italy might improve his party's chances at the polls. Indeed, every German political party—except the Nazi Party—followed Stresemann's lead and vied with each other to offer the strongest possible condemnation of Mussolini's treatment of Italy's German minority.

Hitler publicly stated that Germany needed Italy as an ally, and thus the German government should remain silent about the Tyrol issue. Hitler was roundly condemned by every other German political party for his views about the Tyrol issue; even many of the other Nazi leaders were uncomfortable with Hitler's stance. Hitler wrote Zweites Buch initially to explain why he felt that Germany should not champion Tyrol's German population. Hitler considered Mussolini one of the world's great statesmen, and was willing to abandon Tyrol's German population to forge an alliance with him.

Moreover, Hitler attacked Stresemann for his goal of restoring Germany to its pre-1914 position. In Hitler's view, merely overthrowing the Treaty of Versailles and restoring Germany to its pre-1914 borders was only a temporary solution. In Zweites Buch, Hitler stated his belief that Germany's real problem was the lack of sufficient Lebensraum ("Living space") for the German people. In Hitler's view, only states with large amounts of Lebensraum were successful. In Zweites Buch, Hitler announced that overthrowing the "shackles" of Versailles would be only the first step in a Nazi foreign policy, whose ultimate objective was to obtain the desired Lebensraum in the territory of Russia.
Discovery

Only two copies of the original 200-page manuscript were made, and only one of these copies has ever been made public. Zweites Buch was not published in 1928 as Mein Kampf was not selling well, and Hitler's publisher informed him that having two books out would depress sales even further. By the time Mein Kampf started to sell well after the September 1930 Reichstag elections, Hitler decided that Zweites Buch revealed too much of his foreign policy goals. Kept strictly secret under Hitler's orders, the document was placed in a safe inside an air raid shelter in 1935, where it remained until its discovery by an American officer in 1945. The authenticity of the book was verified by Josef Berg—a former employee of the Nazi publishing house Eher Verlag—and by Telford Taylor, the former Brigadier General U.S.A.R. and Chief Counsel at the Nuremberg war-crimes trials. The book was neither edited nor published during the Nazi Germany era and remains known as Zweites Buch (lit. "Second Book"). The Zweites Buch was first discovered in the Nazi archives being held in the U.S. by the German-born Jewish American historian Gerhard Weinberg in 1958. Unable to find an American publisher, Weinberg turned to his Jewish mentor Hans Rothfels and his associate Martin Broszat at the Institute of Contemporary

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Published by: WBorghuis on Jun 24, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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12/21/2012

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