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Table Of Contents

Tripod
Belt Filling Machine
Tool Box
Spare Parts Instruction
Steam Condensing Device
Detailed Operation Of The Gun In Firing
Functions Of Moving Parts
Backward Movement
Forward Movement
Care And Preservation
Packing The Barrel
Stripping And Assembling
Demonstration
Detailed Outline For Inspection
Elementary Drill
Combined Drill
Rough Ground Drill
Stoppages
Immediate Action
P. 1
Vickers Machine Gun

Vickers Machine Gun

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Published by WBorghuis
The Vickers machine gun or Vickers gun is a name primarily used to refer to the water-cooled .303 British (7.7 mm) machine gun produced by Vickers Limited, originally for the British Army. The machine gun typically required a six to eight-man team to operate: one to fire, one to feed the ammunition, the rest to help carry the weapon, its ammunition and spare parts.[1] It served from before the First World War until the 1960s.

The weapon had a reputation for great solidity and reliability. Ian V. Hogg, in Weapons & War Machines, describes an action that took place in August 1916, during which the British Army's 100th Company of the Machine Gun Corps fired their ten Vickers guns continuously for twelve hours. Using 100 new barrels, they fired a million rounds without a single breakdown. "It was this absolute foolproof reliability which endeared the Vickers to every British soldier who ever fired one."[2]
The Vickers machine gun or Vickers gun is a name primarily used to refer to the water-cooled .303 British (7.7 mm) machine gun produced by Vickers Limited, originally for the British Army. The machine gun typically required a six to eight-man team to operate: one to fire, one to feed the ammunition, the rest to help carry the weapon, its ammunition and spare parts.[1] It served from before the First World War until the 1960s.

The weapon had a reputation for great solidity and reliability. Ian V. Hogg, in Weapons & War Machines, describes an action that took place in August 1916, during which the British Army's 100th Company of the Machine Gun Corps fired their ten Vickers guns continuously for twelve hours. Using 100 new barrels, they fired a million rounds without a single breakdown. "It was this absolute foolproof reliability which endeared the Vickers to every British soldier who ever fired one."[2]

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Published by: WBorghuis on Jun 27, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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04/03/2013

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