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An Everlasting Meal: Cooking with Economy and Grace by Tamar Adler

An Everlasting Meal: Cooking with Economy and Grace by Tamar Adler

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4.4

(40)
|Views: 712|Likes:
Published by Simon and Schuster
Reviving the inspiring message of M. F. K. Fisher’s How to Cook a Wolf— written in 1942 during wartime shortages—An Everlasting Meal shows that cooking is the path to better eating.

Through the insightful essays in An Everlasting Meal, Tamar Adler issues a rallying cry to home cooks.

In chapters about boiling water, cooking eggs and beans, and summoning respectable meals from empty cupboards, Tamar weaves philosophy and instruction into approachable lessons on instinctive cooking. Tamar shows how to make the most of everything you buy, demonstrating what the world’s great chefs know: that great meals rely on the bones and peels and ends of meals before them.

She explains how to smarten up simple food and gives advice for fixing dishes gone awry. She recommends turning to neglected onions, celery, and potatoes for inexpensive meals that taste full of fresh vegetables, and cooking meat and fish resourcefully.

By wresting cooking from doctrine and doldrums, Tamar encourages readers to begin from wherever they are, with whatever they have. An Everlasting Meal is elegant testimony to the value of cooking and an empowering, indispensable tool for eaters today.
Reviving the inspiring message of M. F. K. Fisher’s How to Cook a Wolf— written in 1942 during wartime shortages—An Everlasting Meal shows that cooking is the path to better eating.

Through the insightful essays in An Everlasting Meal, Tamar Adler issues a rallying cry to home cooks.

In chapters about boiling water, cooking eggs and beans, and summoning respectable meals from empty cupboards, Tamar weaves philosophy and instruction into approachable lessons on instinctive cooking. Tamar shows how to make the most of everything you buy, demonstrating what the world’s great chefs know: that great meals rely on the bones and peels and ends of meals before them.

She explains how to smarten up simple food and gives advice for fixing dishes gone awry. She recommends turning to neglected onions, celery, and potatoes for inexpensive meals that taste full of fresh vegetables, and cooking meat and fish resourcefully.

By wresting cooking from doctrine and doldrums, Tamar encourages readers to begin from wherever they are, with whatever they have. An Everlasting Meal is elegant testimony to the value of cooking and an empowering, indispensable tool for eaters today.

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Categories:Types, Recipes/Menus
Publish date: Jun 19, 2012
Added to Scribd: Jun 29, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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08/21/2013

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Praise for
 An Everlasting Meal
“Thought-provoking ideas and practical advice about food, cooking,and eating. It’s hard to imagine a more elegant book on the subject. A  worthy companion to M. F. K. Fisher.”
—Michael Ruhlman, author of 
 Ratio
and
 Ruhlman’s Twenty
“To listen to Ms. Adler talk about cooking is to be drawn into arhythmic dance where each step—from washing and chopping vege-tables to cooking and seasoning the meal—flows effortlessly into thenext.”
—Tara Parker-Pope,
The New York Times
“Reads less like a cookbook than like a recipe for a delicious life.”
 New York
magazine
“Simultaneously more practical and more poetic than any food writ-ing in recent memory.”
 Edible Brooklyn
“Everything here works to sate the soul—and the stomach.”
 Booklist
“Adler proves herself an adept essayist in this extended discourse oninstinctive home cooking. Though highly personal, it’s much less afood memoir than a kind of cooking tao.”
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
“This is a book of beautifully written essays, simultaneouslymeditative and practical, about how to appreciate and use what youhave.”
The Austin Chronicle
“I’ll return to
 An Everlasting Meal
over and over . . . because it remindsme why I began to love to cook in the first place.”
—Monica Strawbridge,
The Huffington Post
 
“The writing is bright and beautiful and draws the reader in the waya good novel does. Read it, if you care about food or cooking—or, forthat matter, eating.”
The Montreal Gazette
“[
 An Everlasting Meal
] is not in its essence a book about how to cook.Cooking is a means to an end. What it really is is a book about howto live a good life. . . . The fact you’ll learn to be a great cook is just abonus.”
—Forbes.com
“From time to time you see a food writer compared to M. F. K.Fisher. . . . In my book there is only one person following in thoselarge footsteps, and that person is Tamar Adler.”
—Tara Austen Weaver, author of 
The Butcher and the Vegetarian
“Reading this book feels much like learning to cook from agrandmother or friend—long, caring conversation leads to simpleinstructions on how to make a homey stew or excellent appetizer. Adler’s tone is relaxing and warm, with few expectations placed uponthe reader to consistently produce haute cuisine from her humblekitchen.”
—Seriouseats.com
“I love [Adler’s] writing style—careful, full, beautiful . . . reading thebook is like having a cooking teacher whispering suggestions in yourear.”
—Novella Carpenter, author of 
 Farm City
“Cooking, as Adler describes it in intricately crafted essays . . . isnot some esoteric discipline only to be truly enjoyed by the highpriests and priestesses of the professional kitchen. No, cooking is what hungry people do. Naturally. In their own kitchens, with basicingredients and unpretentious implements.”
San Francisco Examiner 

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treelf reviewed this
I learned plenty of cooking techniques from Adler’s book, and added a few great recipes to my repertoire – such as a Salsa verde that improves just about everything it touches. But I didn't just adore this book for its practical offerings. Adler’s writing is exquisite and expresses the deep satisfaction one feels from creating meals with simple tools, and available food.
hfineisen reviewed this
Rated 5/5
I originally reviewed this book and noted that it was a must for holiday host/hostess gifts. A love letter to the basics of food, the prose is as delicious as the water lovingly boiled to start any meal. Adler brings our tastebuds back to the basics, from our humble beginnings and our humble hands. I revisit parts of this book as much as my salt shaker, and have become a more frequent and more flavorful cook. My suggestion--get two copies, one for you and one to replace the bottle of wine you normally take to the next dinner party. An Everlasting Meal will be continuously consumed.
dark_phoenix54 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
This is not so much a cookbook as a book about cooking, a philosophy of cooking. Adler’s premise is that simple meals are better than production numbers; that great meals can be had from bits and bobs of old meals; that you should save every little vegetable scrap or peel. Her theories are sound; onion peels and broccoli stems make great stock and everything tastes better cooked in stock. Stale bread is good for any number of things, from croutons to thickening sauce. But while the word ‘economy’ is in the title, the author uses it to mean ‘not wasting things’, rather than ‘eating cheaply’. She recommends vast amounts of butter and olive oil; organic, free range chickens; fancy olives and prosciutto, and buying a responsibly raised cow – going in with a group to do this, of course, not taking the whole beast home yourself- but still expensive when you consider butchering costs and the freezer to put it all in. On the other hand, she does praise beans, bean soups, and grains and tells how to make them turn out best. Those are economical, and, if the free range chicken is place sparingly atop the rice, as she recommends, makes an extremely tasty meal while not using much of the chicken. My other problem is her statement that everything is better salted. While the average human can use (needs!) moderate amounts of salt, a lot of us are getting far too much; a significant population develops hypertension when they eat too much salt. I’d prefer to see most things prepared without much salt, if any, and those who need it can add it at the table. Simple enough to just ignore her statements about salt and not put it in when following her recipes, but I’m not sure the world needs a voice telling it that such and such NEEDS salt. Adler has a elegant, rambling way of writing. Some sections are lovely; others drag slowly to the point. There are only a few recipes; they are of the ‘see how simple this is?’ sort to encourage people to try cooking by her methods. It’s a book for if you really want to *think* about cooking.
lisacurcio reviewed this
Rated 5/5
This simple and engaging book about cooking is intended to let the world know that cooking is simple and engaging. For those who already love to cook, reading this book will enhance your time in the kitchen. For those who are afraid to cook, Ms. Adler will convince you that anyone can cook as she does.One can and should actually read this book rather than just pick through recipes in it. Ms. Adler not only knows how to cook and knows how to simply present her ideas and methods--she is a lyrical writer sprinkling through the text and at the head of chapters quotations from literature, mythology and other good cooks. The chapters build on each other. Simple methods of preparation of simple ingredients result in just good food. Nothing is wasted in her kitchen, and the cook who embraces her ways will likely save money on the food budget while enjoying the meals even more.
gincam reviewed this
Rated 4/5
"An Everlasting Meal", by Tamar Adler, is an impressive, informed, invaluable inside look at the pleasure and practicality of food usage and cooking in a sustainable manner. Making the most of the flavors found in almost every part and particle of foods both common and exotic is not a new theory, nor is it one lacking in culinary satisfaction. On the contrary, learning to incorporate natural flavors and cooking essences into savory seasonings and sauces is a true treat for the taste buds. This is a carry-it-forward food plan that takes some skill in the kitchen, an organized mind, and a commitment to not letting valuable resources go to waste. Why throw it out and then have to go buy it again? Why not accept it, embrace it, and enjoy it? My favorite chapter in the book is "How to Live Well", and it glorifies one of the most humble, and most essential of all foods: the dried bean. Being from the South, I have an innate love for a bowl of brown beans with some boiled potatoes and a hunk of cornbread on the side. Add some sliced onions and slices of juicy home-grown tomatoes, and you have a peasant's meal fit for royalty! There are wonderful recipes and cooking tips throughout "An Everlasting Meal", but there is also a gentle reminder of how simple and soothing it can be to just cook and enjoy food with your family and friends. Review Copy Gratis Simon & Schuster
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