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Hegemony Impacts

Hegemony Impacts

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03/07/2013

 
HegemonyDDI 2008 Kernoff/OlneyKrishnan Ramanujan
Hegemony
Hegemony ...............................................................................................................................................................1Heg Bad 1NC ..........................................................................................................................................................3Heg Bad 1NC ..........................................................................................................................................................4Heg Bad 1NC ..........................................................................................................................................................5Heg Bad 1NC ..........................................................................................................................................................6Heg Unsustainable .................................................................................................................................................7Heg Unsustainable .................................................................................................................................................8Transition Now .....................................................................................................................................................10Offshore Balancing ...............................................................................................................................................11Offshore Balancing Solves War ..........................................................................................................................12Offshore Balancing Solves War ..........................................................................................................................13Offshore Balancing Solves Counterbalancing ...................................................................................................14Heg Bad Modules – Terrorism ............................................................................................................................15Heg Bad Modules – Economy .............................................................................................................................16Heg Bad Modules – Prolif (1/3) ...........................................................................................................................17Heg Bad Module – Prolif (2/3) ............................................................................................................................18Heg Bad Modules – Prolif (3/3) ...........................................................................................................................19Heg Bad Modules – Iraq ......................................................................................................................................20Heg Bad Modules – China (1/2) ..........................................................................................................................21Heg Bad Modules -China (2/2) ...........................................................................................................................22Heg Bad Modules – EU ........................................................................................................................................23Heg Good 1NC ......................................................................................................................................................25Heg Sustainable ....................................................................................................................................................26Heg Sustainable ....................................................................................................................................................27AT: Transition Now ..............................................................................................................................................28Khalilzad Long (1/2) ............................................................................................................................................30Khalilzad Long (2/2) ............................................................................................................................................31Thayer (1/3) ..........................................................................................................................................................32Thayer (2/3) ..........................................................................................................................................................33Thayer (3/3) ..........................................................................................................................................................33AT: Counterbalancing .........................................................................................................................................35
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HegemonyDDI 2008 Kernoff/OlneyKrishnan Ramanujan
AT: EU Counterbalancing ...................................................................................................................................36AT: China Counterbalancing ..............................................................................................................................37AT: Offshore balancing ........................................................................................................................................38AT: Offshore Balancing .......................................................................................................................................39Heg good modules – Prolif (1/3) ..........................................................................................................................40Heg Good Modules – Prolif (2/3) ........................................................................................................................41Heg Good Modules – Prolif (3/3) ........................................................................................................................42Heg Good Modules - Terrorism ..........................................................................................................................43Heg Good Modules - Democracy ........................................................................................................................44Heg Good Modules - Economy ..........................................................................................................................45Heg Good Modules – Free Trade ........................................................................................................................46Heg Good Modules - Space .................................................................................................................................47Heg Good Modules – China Containment .........................................................................................................48Heg Good Modules – Asian Prolif ......................................................................................................................49
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HegemonyDDI 2008 Kernoff/OlneyKrishnan Ramanujan
Heg Bad 1NC
1. Imperial overstretch and a declining economy doom US heg – empiricallyproven.
Jeffrey
Frankel
, Harpel Professor of capital formation and growth, Harvard University, Journal of Policy Modeling,
2006
,http://ksghome.harvard.edu/~jfrankel/SalvatoreDeficitsHegemonJan26Jul.pdf 
The decline in the pound was clearly part of a larger pattern whereby the United Kingdom lost its economic pre-eminence, colonies, military power, and other trappings of international hegemony
. As some of us wonder whether 
theUnited States might now have embarked on a path of “imperial over-reach,” following the British Empire down a roadof widening federal budget deficits and overly ambitious military adventures
in the Muslim world, the fate of the pound is perhaps a useful caution. The Suez crisis of 1956 is frequently recalled as the occasion on which Britain was forced under US pressure to abandon its remaining imperial designs. But the important role played by a simultaneous run on the pound is oftenforgotten.
10
Paul Kennedy
(1989)
’s
 
suggestion of the imperial overreach hypothesis and its application to US hegemonymay have been essentially correct but 20years premature
, much like the forecasts of those in the early 1990s who warned prematurely of the dollar’s imminent demise.
Over the last four decades, our allies have been willing to pay a financial price to support American leadership of theinternational economy, because they correctly saw it to be in their interests
. In the 1960s, Germany was willing to offsetthe expenses of stationing U.S. troops on bases there so as to save the United States from a balance of payments deficit. In the1980s, the U.S. military was charged less to station troops in high-rent Japan than if they had been based at home. In 1991,Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and a number of other countries were willing to pay for the financial cost of the war against Iraq, thustemporarily wiping out the U.S. current account deficit for the only time in a twenty-year period. Repeatedly the Bank of Japan, among other central banks, has been willing to buy dollars to prevent the U.S. currency from depreciating (late 1960s,early 1970s, late 1980s).During the same period that the United States has lost its budget surplus and the twin deficits have re-emerged, i.e.,
since 2001,we have
also
lost popular sympathy and political support
in much of the rest of the world.
11
In the past, deficits fromimperial overstretch have been manageable because others have paid the bills for our troops overseas
: Germany andJapan during the Cold War, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia in 1991.
Now the hegemon has lost its claim to legitimacy in the eyesof many.
 
Next time the US asks other central banks to bail out the dollar, will they be as willing to do so as Europe wasin the 1960s, or
as
Japan
was
in the late 1980s
after the Louvre Agreement?
I fear not
.
2. Heg declining now – three reasons. Maintaining heg leads to a powervacuum which culminates in war.
Carlos Eduardo
Martins
is research director of the UNESCO-UNU Network on the Global Economy and SustainableDevelopment and an associate researcher at the Laboratory of Public Policy of the State University of Rio de Janeiro, translated by Timothy Thompson, Ph.D. candidate in English at Boston College.
Latin American Perspectives
2007
; 34;16,
http://lap.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/34/1/16
I would argue that
since 1967 the United States has been in a period of hegemonic decline. It still maintains its financial,ideological, and military hegemony, but it has been made increasingly vulnerable by the pressure that the current-accountdeficit in the balance of payments is exerting on the dollar, by neoliberalism’s crisis of legitimacy, and by the unfolding impactof September 11, 2001, which has reignited both U.S. imperialism and military-political reactions against it, threatening toexpand the costs of securing the world-system to unforeseen dimensions
.
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 To situate the trajectory of U.S. hegemonyin the world-system,
we must
bring the
longue durée
into our analysis. To do so, we should
consider the
following analytical elements:1.
Systemic cycles
, theorized by the world-system school in works by writers such as Giovanni Arrighi andBeverly Silver (1999) and Immanuel Wallerstein (1996).
These cycles are organized according to hegemoniesdivided into phases of expansion and crisis. During the crisis phase, the hegemon uses its financial power to continue leadingglobal accumulation, but its financial strength soon gives way to increasing deterioration of its productive and commercialbases. The disintegration of hegemony gives rise to a stage of systemic chaos, and a bifurcation emerges in which new powerstructures vie for control.
In historical capitalism, this process culminates in “thirty years’ wars” that endwith a single configuration of power, one that reconstitutes the world-system upon new bases andincreases both its breadth and the interaction among its parts.
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