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KMT - RPS Aff Supplement

KMT - RPS Aff Supplement

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Published by: AffNeg.Com on Jan 08, 2009
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09/14/2012

 
SDI 2008KMTRPS Aff – Supplement
RPS AFF - SUPPLEMENT
RPS AFF - SUPPLEMENT ..........................................................................................................................................11AC ...............................................................................................................................................................................31AC ...............................................................................................................................................................................41AC ...............................................................................................................................................................................51AC ...............................................................................................................................................................................61AC ...............................................................................................................................................................................71AC ...............................................................................................................................................................................81AC ...............................................................................................................................................................................91AC .............................................................................................................................................................................10...................................................................................................................................................................................101AC .............................................................................................................................................................................111AC .............................................................................................................................................................................121AC .............................................................................................................................................................................131AC .............................................................................................................................................................................141AC .............................................................................................................................................................................151AC .............................................................................................................................................................................16WARMING EXTS – UTILITY INDUSTRY KEY ....................................................................................................17ECONOMY EXTS – MANUFACTURING SECTOR EXTS ...................................................................................18BLACKOUTS EXTS – BLACKOUTS -> NUCLEAR POWER MELTDOWN ......................................................19BLACKOUTS EXTS – NUCLEAR POWER MELTDOWN IMPACTS .................................................................20SOFT POWER EXTS – ENVIRO LEADERSHIP DECLINING .............................................................................21SOFT POWER EXTS – US ACTION ON WARMING KEY ...................................................................................22COMPETITIVENESS EXTS – FEDERAL LEADERSHIP KEY ............................................................................23COMPETITIVENESS EXTS – RENEWABLES KEY ............................................................................................24 NATURAL GAS EXTS – PLAN ↓ DEPENDENCE .................................................................................................25 NATURAL GAS EXTS – TERMINALS HARM ENVIRONMENT ........................................................................26 NATURAL GAS EXTS – TERROR RISK ................................................................................................................272AC T FRONTLINE – RPS = INCENTIVE ..............................................................................................................282AC T FRONTLINE – RPS = INCENTIVE ..............................................................................................................291AR T HELPERS – RPS = POSITIVE INCENTIVE ................................................................................................30T HELPERS – 20% IS SUBSTANTIAL ....................................................................................................................312AC STATES CP FRONTLINE .................................................................................................................................322AC STATES CP FRONTLINE .................................................................................................................................332AC STATES CP FRONTLINE .................................................................................................................................342AC STATES CP FRONTLINE – OHIO DA ............................................................................................................352AC STATES CP FRONTLINE – COMPETITIVENESS ........................................................................................361AR – STATES CP EXTS – DIFFERING DEFINTIONS .........................................................................................371AR - STATES CP EXTS – OHIO .............................................................................................................................38AT: COAL/NUCLEAR POWER COUNTERPLANS ..............................................................................................392AC OBAMA GOOD FRONTLINE ........................................................................................................................402AC OBAMA GOOD FRONTLINE .........................................................................................................................412AC CLEAN COAL DA FRONTLINE ....................................................................................................................422AC CLEAN COAL DA FRONTLINE .....................................................................................................................432AC CLEAN COAL DA FRONTLINE .....................................................................................................................441AR EXTS – CLEAN COAL INDUSTRY WEAK NOW – RENEWABLES ..........................................................451AR EXTS – COAL INDUSTRY WEAK NOW - INVESTMENT ..........................................................................461
 
SDI 2008KMTRPS Aff – Supplement
1AC
ADVANTAGE ____: THE ECONOMYTHE FINITE NATURE AND SUPPLY INSTABILITY OF FOSSIL FUELS GUARANTEES PRICEVOLATILITY – DELAYING ACTION INCREASES THE COST OF TRANSITIONING AWAY FROMFOSSIL FUELSAMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 2008[
Statement on Energy Science and Technology”,
http://portal.acs.org/portal/acs/corg/content?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=PP_SUPERARTICLE&node_id=1890&use_sec=false&sec _url_var=region1/ ttate]
Plentiful, accessible, inexpensive energy is the underpinning of modern society. It is the basis for meetingnumerous national and global needs such as increased demands for electricity and transportation, affordable foodand water, and adequate resources for manufacturing. In the U.S., reliable, affordable energy is crucial to theeconomic well-being and security of our nation. The time has come for us to confront future energy options. TheACS and AIChE believe a comprehensive national energy strategy must address S&T opportunities thoroughly tomake the best near-term decisions and develop new options for a more sustainable future.The most important reason to address this issue now is the growing, global dependence on oil and natural gas,which experts agree are available in limited and rapidly declining quantities. Demand for oil will continue to growas countries raise standards of living—especially populous, developing nations like China and India. As we move beyond the world’s maximum oil production point and demands continue to rise, prices and instability willcertainly increase. Estimates vary on total oil resources, but it would be a mistake to assume that fossil fuel wouldremain at current prices, given the inherently unstable nature of commodity markets, geopolitics, and policychanges.
We believe a targeted allocation of funds and timely change in energy
 
 policy would postpone the inevitable date that oil production would begin to decline.Thus, investment in increasing energy options is paramount. Market forces will play an important, but not sufficient, role in meeting future energy needs.
A suddenincrease in energy prices or long periods of energy-price instability would result in energy shortfalls, which in turnwould significantly impact global economic growth.
Sufficient investment in energy innovations to increase availability and allow profoundinfrastructure changes (e.g., converting gasoline vehicles to hydrogen or increasing the use of public transportation) would require an ongoing, commitment over severaldecades. Given the investment of time and the technology needed, it is imperative to take immediate steps toward solving this problem. According to the Energy InformationAgency, U.S. domestic energy utilization in 2003 was roughly 85 percent fossil fuel, 8
 
 percent nuclear power, and 6 percent renewable energy—including hydroelectricity.Clearly, America is overly dependent on fossil fuel, much of which comes from unstable regions of the world. Energy-use patterns—22 percent residential, 52 percentindustrial, and 27 percent transportation—must also be considered in developing a comprehensive U.S. energy policy. Energy efficiency and conservation must beencouraged across the board.At present, the S&T required to move beyond fossil-energy dependence and provide safely produced, sustainable power to meet growing, global needs, is simply notavailable. The ACS and AIChE recommend developing a dual-track, comprehensive R&D strategy that would simultaneously implement a near-term advancement of energytechnologies (including fossil, solar, wind, nuclear, and efficient utilization) and a comprehensive S&T policy for developing sustainable sources to replace dwindling fossilsupplies in the long term.
Finding solutions to meet advancing world needs for sustainable energy is one of the biggest challenges mankindwill ever face. Burning fossil fuels places humanity at risk environmentally, and the potential consequences aredramatic.
We must call upon universities, the private sector, and national laboratories to provide the best minds and teams to develop creative solutions through energyR&D.
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