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Greek

Greek

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Published by romeyg
greek myths and gods
greek myths and gods

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Published by: romeyg on Jan 11, 2008
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06/28/2013

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 A HAND-BOOK OF MYTHOLOGY.
THE
M
YTHS
 
AND
L
EGENDS
OF
ANCIENT GREECE AND ROME.
BY
E. M. BERENS.
 ILLUSTRATED FROM ANTIQUE SCULPTURES.
NEW YORK:
M
AYNARD
, M
ERRILL
, & C
O
.,
43, 45
AND
47 E
AST
T
ENTH
S
TREET
.
[i]
PREFACE.
The want of an interesting work on Greek and Roman mythology, suitable for the requirementsof both boys and girls, has long been recognized by the principals of our advanced schools. Thestudy of the classics themselves, even where the attainments of the pupil have rendered thisfeasible, has not been found altogether successful in giving to the student a clear and succinctidea of the religious beliefs of the ancients, and it has been suggested that a work which would sodeal with the subject as to render it at once interesting and instructive would be hailed as avaluable introduction to the study of classic authors, and would be found to assist materially thelabours of both master and pupil.In endeavouring to supply this want I have sought to place before the reader a lifelike picture of the deities of classical times as they were conceived and worshipped by the ancients themselves,
 
and thereby to awaken in the minds of young students a desire to become more intimatelyacquainted with the noble productions of classical antiquity.It has been my aim to render the Legends, which form the second portion of the work, a picture,as it were, of old Greek life; its customs, its superstitions, and its princely hospitalities, for whichreason they are given at somewhat greater length than is usual in works of the kind.In a chapter devoted to the purpose some interesting particulars have been collected respectingthe public worship of the ancient Greeks and Romans (more especially of the former), to whichis subjoined an account of their principal festivals.I may add that no pains have been spared in order that, without passing over details the omissionof which would have
[ii]
marred the completeness of the work, not a single passage should befound which could possibly offend the most scrupulous delicacy; and also that I have purposelytreated the subject with that reverence which I consider due to every religious system, however erroneous.It is hardly necessary to dwell upon the importance of the study of Mythology: our poems, our novels, and even our daily journals teem with classical allusions; nor can a visit to our artgalleries and museums be fully enjoyed without something more than a mere superficialknowledge of a subject which has in all ages inspired painters, sculptors, and poets. It thereforeonly remains for me to express a hope that my little work may prove useful, not only to teachersand scholars, but also to a large class of general readers, who, in whiling away a leisure hour,may derive some pleasure and profit from its perusal.E. M. BERENS.
[iii]
CONTENTS.PART I.—MYTHS.Introduction, 7FIRST DYNASTY.O
RIGIN
 
OF
 
THE
W
ORLD
 — U
RANUS
 
AND
G
 ÆA
(Cœlus and Terra),11SECOND DYNASTY.C
RONUS
(Saturn), 14
HEA
(Ops),18D
IVISION
 
OF
 
THE
W
ORLD
,19T
HEORIES
 
AS
 
TO
 
THE
O
RIGIN
 
OF
M
AN
, 21THIRD DYNASTY.OLYMPIAN DIVINITIES— Z
EUS
(Jupiter),26H
ERA
(Juno),38P
ALLAS
-A
THENE
(Minerva), 43T
HEMIS
,48H
ESTIA
(Vesta),48D
EMETER 
(Ceres),50
 
A
PHRODITE
(Venus),58H
ELIOS
(Sol),61E
OS
(Aurora),67P
HŒBUS
-A
POLLO
,68H
ECATE
, 85S
ELENE
(Luna), 86A
RTEMIS
(Diana),87H
EPHÆSTUS
(Vulcan),97P
OSEIDON
(Neptune),101
[iv]
 SEA DIVINITIES— O
CEANUS
, 107 N
EREUS
,108P
ROTEUS
,108T
RITON
 
AND
 
THE
T
RITONS
LAUCUS
HETIS
,110T
HAUMAS
, P
HORCYS
,
AND
C
ETO
,111L
EUCOTHEA
,111T
HE
S
IRENS
,112A
RES
(Mars),112 N
IKE
(Victoria), 117H
ERMES
(Mercury), 117D
IONYSUS
(Bacchus or Liber),124A
ÏDES
(Pluto),130P
LUTUS
, 137MINOR DIVINITIES— T
HE
H
ARPIES
,137E
RINYES
, E
UMENIDES
(Furiæ, Diræ),138M
OIRÆ
 
OR 
F
ATES
(Parcæ), 139 N
EMESIS
,141 N
IGHT
 
AND
H
ER 
C
HILDREN
 —  N
YX
(Nox),142T
HANATOS
(Mors), H
YPNUS
(Somnus),142M
ORPHEUS
,143T
HE
G
ORGONS
,144G
RÆÆ
,145S
PHINX
,146T
YCHE
(Fortuna) and A
 NANKE
(Necessitas),147
ER 
,149A
TE
OMUS
,149E
ROS
(Cupid, Amor) and P
SYCHE
YMEN
,154I
RIS
EBE
(Juventas),156G
ANYMEDES
,157

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