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Microwave-Propelled Sails and Their Control

Microwave-Propelled Sails and Their Control

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Published by megustalazorra
This paper presents the microwave-propelled sail, its structure, assumptions. We will present its equations of motion, then we will conduct stability analysis and we will design two controllers to make it asymptotically stable and marginally stable.
This paper presents the microwave-propelled sail, its structure, assumptions. We will present its equations of motion, then we will conduct stability analysis and we will design two controllers to make it asymptotically stable and marginally stable.

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Published by: megustalazorra on Jul 04, 2012
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1
Microwave-propelled sails and their control
E. Chahine, C.T. Abdallah, E. SchamilogluElectrical & Computer Engineering DepartmentMSC01 11001 University of New MexicoAlbuquerque, NM 87131-0001E-mail:
{
elias,chaouki,edl
}
@eece.unm.edu
& D. GoergievDepartment of Mechanical EngineeringThe University of MichiganAnn Arbor, MI 48109-2125E-mail:
dgeorgie@umich.edu
 Abstract
This paper presents the microwave-propelled sail,its structure, assumptions. We will present its equations of motion, then we will conduct stability analysis and we will designtwo controllers to make it asymptotically stable and marginallystable.
I. I
NTRODUCTION
While space has intrigued humans from the beginning of time, it wasn’t until the twentieth century that man began hisspace conquest. Though it has been almost half a century sinceSputnik orbited the earth, the aerospace technology is still inits infantry with a huge potential. This paper will discuss anew generation of spacecraft, the microwave-propelled sail.The idea builds upon solar sails[4] which have been in theliterature since the 1970’s. The idea of microwave-propelledsails is very similar, but instead of the sun’s photons hittingthe solar sail at the right angle, the microwave-propelledsail alleviates that problem since we have ”control” over thepower source and its direction. The microwave sail architecturecomprises very large ultra-weight apertures and structures.One of its distinguishing improvements is mission capabilityand reduction in mission cost, plus the ability of interstellarexploration missions. Microwave-propelled sails, along withsolar and other types of sails will provide low-cost propulsion,and long-range mission. In [4], McInnes gives a general viewon solar sails. Stability and control of carbon fiber sailspropelled using microwave radiation in 1-D has been studied in[1], [2]. This paper will cover the sail shape and assumptionsneeded for our analysis of the sail, along with its equations of motion, and control design structure.In this paper, we will start in section II by the physicaldimensions of the sail and listing the different assumptionsused, we will then describe the coordinate frames in sectionIII, the equations of motion will be introduced in section IV,followed by a stability analysis in section V, and a linearizationapproach in section VI, with the presentation of two controllersin section VII, and simulation results in section VIII.
Notation
An arrow above the symbol designates a vector, andall vectors are assumed to be column vectors,
refers to thequaternion multiplication,
q
refers to the quaternion complexconjugate,
L
q
is the frame rotation matrix. For any vector
v
= [
v
1
,v
2
,v
3
]
, the cross product operator is defined as:
˜
v
=
0
v
3
v
2
v
3
0
v
1
v
2
v
1
0
II. S
AIL
The sail studied has an umbrella-like configuration withconcave sides facing the radiation source and has a boundedmotion behavior. The sail is composed of a reflector madeout of a light-weight carbon fiber material, a hollow mast andpayload represented by a ball. The mast is attached at thereflector center of mass (CM), and connects the payload to thereflector. The payload is not directly attached to the reflectorfor stability reasons. To obtain passive dynamic stability :
The reflector must be located aft of the vehicle CM forrotational stability
The reflector must be of a concave shape such that theconcave shape faces the radiation source for translationalstability.The notion of beam-riding, i.e. the stable flight of a sailpropelled by Poynting flux caused by a constant power source,places considerable demands upon a sail. Even if the beam issteady, a sail can wander off the beam if its shape becomesdeformed or if it does not have enough spin to keep its angularmomentum aligned with the beam direction in the face of perturbations. The microwave beam pressure keeps concaveshapes in tension, so concave shapes arise naturally whilebeam-riding. they will resist sidewise motions if the beammoves off-center, since a net sideways force restores the sailto its position (See figure 5). Therefore, our sail will have aconcave shape, depicted in the figure below,1.
 A. Assumptions
In this section, we list the assumptions needed to simplifyour analysis of the microwave-propelled sail.
The system is considered as a rigid body
The reflector has full reflectivity. The actual carbon fiberused in our experiments has 98% reflectivity.
Space 200323 - 25 September 2003, Long Beach, California
AIAA 2003-6268
Copyright © 2003 by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc. All rights reserved.
 
2
 ¨  ¨  ¨  ¨  ¨r  r  r  r  r 
 
  v
Fig. 1. Microwave sail concave shape
There are no internal reflections.
The payload and the mast do not block the microwavebeam.
There are no aerodynamic influences
The microwave source is modelled as a point source witha square wave-guide.
The gravity vector g, points towards the negative Z-axisof the inertial frame (See figure 4).
 B. Reflector model
Since we have chosen our reflector to be of a conicalshape, any cross-section orthogonal to the mast is a circle.The reflector surface is created by revolving a parameterizedcurve about the body z-axis. The following is a fourth orderpolynomial approximation of the parameterized curve:
(
r/R
) =
a
0
+
a
1
(
r/R
)+
a
2
(
r/R
)
2
+
a
3
(
r/R
)
3
+
a
4
(
r/R
)
4
(1)where
a
0
,a
1
,a
2
,a
3
,
and
a
4
are shape constants,
r
is theradial distance from the body z-axis,
R
is the radius of thecircle. We obtain a conical shape when
a
0
= 0
,
a
1
<
0
,and
(
a
2
,a
3
,a
4
) = 0
, with concave facing-down shape. Thecircle is chosen because of its symmetry and its advantagesto stability. For more details on the reflector shape design, thereader is referred to [3] (See figures 2 and 3 for illustration).III. C
OORDINATE
F
RAMES
There are two coordinate frames defined for this system, asdepicted in figure 4: the inertial frame and the body frame. The
x
b
,y
b
,z
b
axes of the body frame are attached to the vehicleCM with
z
b
aligned with the mast axis. The inertial frame
{
,
,
}
has the gravity vector in the
direction. Themicrowave source which is represented as a point source islocated on the
{
}
axis at
{
0
,
0
,
D
}
in the inertial frame(with
D >
0
). The microwave beam radiates in the
+
direction with its maximum intensity aligned with the
+
.The offset between the vehicle CM and the reflector CM,defined as d (
d >
0
). Since
D
d
then we consider thedistance from the source to the reflector CM to be D.IV. E
QUATIONS OF MOTION
For a rigid body, the equations of motion are very wellestablished,[3],[5] and [6].
Fig. 2. Representative mesh illustrating elements and corresponding areas,notice that boundary elements require special consideration in area and normalvector calculationsFig. 3. Reflector mesh in MATLAB illustrating the parameterized curve
˙
r
=
v
(2)
˙
v
=
 m
+
 G
(3)
˙
 q
=12
q
 ω
(4)
˙
 ω
=
1
[
 ω
×
J ω
+
 
]
(5)
r
is the coordinate vector in the inertial frame
(
m
)
.
v
as the velocity vector in the inertial frame
(
m/s
)
.
q
is the attitude quaternion that specifies body frameorientation in inertial coordinates and
 q
= [
q
1
;
q
2
;
q
3
;
q
4
] =[
q
1
;
 α
]
 
3
Fig. 4. Microwave sail coordinate systems and states.
 ω
as the angular velocity vector in the body frame
(
rad/s
)
.
m
is the total mass of the system
(
Kg
)
.
 G
is the gravity vector such that
 G
= [0
,
0
,
9
.
807]
(
m/s
2
)
.J is the vehicle moment of inertia
(
Kg/m
2
)
.
 
is the radiation-induced inertial force on the vehicle
(
Kg.m/s
2
)
.
 
is the radiation-induced body torque on the vehicle
(
Kg.m
2
/s
2
)
.The force
 
and the torque
 
are given by [3]:
 
=
 q
2
 
ref 
dAρ
e
cos
2
ψ
e
 
ˆ
n
eb
 
ˆ
n
eb
(3)
 q
(6)
 
=
 
ref 
r
eb
×
2
 
ref 
dAρ
e
cos
2
ψ
e
 
ˆ
n
eb
 
ˆ
n
eb
(3)
(7)with
r
eb
is the vehicle CM to element location vector in thebody-frame.
 
ˆ
n
eb
is the reflection unit normal in the body frame at
r
eb
.
dA
is the element area.
ψ
e
is the angle between the element local normal and thedirection of incident radiation.
ρ
e
is the energy density function.For a square wave-guide
ρ
e
becomes
ρ
e
=
t
(
cos
2
φcos
n
x
θ
+
sin
2
φcos
n
y
θ
)4
πs
2
(8)where
t
is the transmitted power.
n
x
,n
y
are the power indices in the inertial X and Y directionsrespectively.
θ
is the angle with the inertial Z-axis.
φ
is the angle with the inertial X-axis.
s
is the distance from the source
r
=
 
x
2
+
y
2
+
z
2
The physical control inputs to the system are therefore,
t
,n
x
,
and
n
y
. In section VII, we will design controllers usingthe force
 
and torque
 
and
t
,n
x
,
and
n
y
respectively asour control inputs.V. S
TABILITY ANALYSIS
Let
x
=
{
r,v, q,  w
}
be the state of the system. The equa-tions of motion are then described by the nonlinear differentialequation
˙
x
=
(
x
)
(9)The equilibria for the nonlinear system
(
 x
) = 0
are obtainedas
x
0
=
{
(0
,
0
,z
eq
)
,
(1
,
0
,
0
,
0)
,
(0
,
0
,
0)
,
(0
,
0
,
0)
}
. Since wedo not have any source of natural damping, the system can bemarginally or neutrally stable at best. Basically, equilibrium isachieved when the body-frame axes are aligned (parallel) withthe inertial frames axes, and the origin of the body-frame ison the inertial Z-axis, at a desired distance from the source.Perturbations occur in translational directions representedwith cylindrical coordinates,
R
and
, and in angulardirections represented with the Euler angles, yaw, pitch, androll. For most of the translational displacements, the reflector’sconcave shape will compensate and will bring the vehicle toequilibrium as discussed previously. The angular perturbationsare more serious. When the reflector shape provides a ”restor-ing force” effect, we notice that the force is greater on thereflector surface closest to the microwave beam leading torotation away from equilibrium. This will cause the system tobecome unstable to pitch and roll perturbations. To compensatethis effect, a stabilizing torque is induced by the addition of the payload. In the next section, we will attempt to get a moreanalytical understanding of stability through linearization.a) b)
 ¨  ¨  ¨  ¨  ¨r  r  r  r  r 
 
   {¨
   =
    ⇒
Resultant ForceMicrowave SourceIntensity
 e  e  e u ¡  ¡  ¡ ! ¨  ¨  ¨  ¨  ¨r  r  r  r  r 
 
   {¨
     =
     ⇒
Microwave SourceIntensity
 e  e  e  e u ¡  ¡ !
Resultant/Restoring Force
Fig. 5. A means of obtaining a ‘restoring forcevia reflector shapemanipulation

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