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DAILY 07.05.12

DAILY 07.05.12

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Print edition of The Stanford Daily, published July 05, 2012
Print edition of The Stanford Daily, published July 05, 2012

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07/04/2012

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 The Stanford Daily
 An Independent Publication
THURSDAYVolume 242
July 5, 2012Issue 1
SUMMER WEEKLY EDITION
Opinions 4
 A year after ROTC was approved at Stanford, are we giving the military the respect it deserves?
Sports 5
 San Jose Earthquakes storm back to defeat L.A.Galaxy 4-3; Beckham gets booked with a yellow
Intermission10
 Andrew Garfield plays a charismatic Peter Parkerin ‘The Amazing Spider-Man’
 The Stanford Daily
 
By BRENDAN O’BYRNE
EXECUTIVE EDITOR
“Law is the power we have toprotect the weak and oppressedagainst the strong,” Fatou Ben-souda, chief prosecutor for theInternational Criminal Court(ICC) of the United Nations, tolda crowded Hewlett Auditoriumon Wednesday, June 27.As chief prosecutor for theICC, Bensouda serves in a divi-sion of the United Nations thatprosecutes international crimi-nals for offenses such as geno-cide, mass rape and crimesagainst humanity. She is only thesecond chief prosecutor in thecourt’s history and the firstwoman to hold the position.The ICC seeks to provide“one standard for all states, par-ties and the people under its pro-tection,” Bensouda said.“Wars and conflicts are nolonger the opposition of twostates or two armies,” she said.“We are no longer confined toour town or regional or nationalborders.”Originally from Gambia, Ben-souda studied and practiced lawin her home country, and waselected deputy prosecutor of theICC in 2004. She was named oneof Time Magazine’s 100 most in-fluential people for 2012.The United States has had a“schizophrenic” relationshipwith the ICC, according to HelenStacey, a senior fellow at Stan-ford’s Center for Democracy,Development and the Rule of Law. Stacey introduced Bensou-da and asked several questionsafter her presentation.Former President Bill Clintonsigned the treaty establishing theICC as he was leaving office, butthe decision was quickly reversedwhen George W. Bush withdrewin 2002. Barack Obama has pur-sued “engagement” with the ICC,but the United States has yet to join as a member state. Member-ship is a contentious issue, as theICC has jurisdictional authorityto investigate and prosecute citi-zens or residents of member na-tions for international crimes.While taking strong stances onissues such as criminal prosecu-tions and international justice,Bensouda tactfully replied toquestions about the UnitedStates’ involvement.“As an officer of the court, Ido not question why any govern-ment or any state would not jointhe ICC,” Bensouda said. “I thinkthat even without the UnitedStates joining the ICC, I think theICC has already come to be oneof the relevant players in theworld in settling these interna-tional conflicts and bringing ac-countability for these crimes.”Bensouda’s reluctance toenter the political debate sur-rounding member states is part of a wider mission to remain apolit-ical, which Bensouda said is crit-ical to the ICC’s integrity.“The ICC is a powerful newtool to prevent crime, detercrimes and promote national pro-ceedings,” Bensouda said, “but itwill only be successful if we neveryield to political considerations.”The issue is complicated, how-ever, because the ICC has no en-forcement power and relies onthe armies and police forces of member countries to take actionson warrants.Bensouda praised the now-fa-mous “Kony 2012” video severaltimes for the contribution it madeto raising awareness about thecrimes of Joseph Kony. The ICCissued a warrant for Kony’s arrestin 2005, but Bensouda said it wasnot until Invisible Children’svideo came out that people beganto know who he was and whatcrimes he had committed.Stacey pointed out the inaccu-racies in the video, and Bensoudareadily acknowledged it was notperfectbut said shefelt the positive impactoutweighed the negative.Several audience membersasked about atrocities the ICCwasn’t currently investigating inChina, Syria and Mexico. WhileBensouda acknowledged themassacre and atrocities in Syria,she said the ICC has no authorityto investigate non-member coun-tries such as Syria and China un-less asked to do so by the UnitedNations Security Council.Unlike those two countries,Mexico is a full member of theICC and thus subject to investiga-tion. In November 2011, the ICCwas asked by Mexican humanrights activists to investigatethen-President Felipe Calderonfor his actions in the war againstdrug cartels. Bensouda’s prede-cessor and former boss saidthe ICC would not hear the com-plaint.When asked by an audiencemember whether crimes werebeing investigated in Mexico,Bensouda said the court is moni-toring the situation but no currentinvestigation is underway.“We have not started activelyengaging, but we also are receiv-ing information,” she said. “Wehave been receiving a lot of infor-mation from everywhere aboutMexico.”“I think that’s code for ‘watchthis space,’” Stacey added.The presentation was thekeynote address for the StanfordSummer Human Rights Pro-gram’s lecture series.
Contact Brendan O’Byrne at bobyrne@stanford.edu.
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UNIVERSITY
Cory Bookerspeaks at graduation
By BILLY GALLAGHER
EDITOR IN CHIEF
“This University and this mo-ment fills me with a sense of grat-itude. Today is not just a day of celebration but a day of appreci-ation,” Mayor of Newark, N.J.,Cory Booker ’91 M.A. ’92 saidduring his keynote address to theclass of 2012 at Stanford’s 121stCommencement.Booker’s personal speech fo-cused on his father and grandfa-ther. He also shared extensivelyfrom his experiences in Newark.“They taught me what itmeans to be a man,” Booker saidabout the two men, commentingon the overlap of Commence-ment and Father’s Day. Bookershared a joke his grandfathertold him on Booker’s Stanfordgraduation day.“The tassel is worth the has-sle,” he remembered, to thecrowd’s laughter.Booker framed his speecharound an idea he called “theconspiracy of love,” tying it to hisfamily, personal experiences,American unity and the 2012graduates.He spoke about his fathergrowing up poor and receiving fi-nancial help from his communityto pay for his first semester atNorth Carolina Central Univer-sity, and his parents’ struggles tobe hired and buy a home as
 Newark mayor shares lessons from family
EVENTS
ICC prosecutor talks justice
Please see
BOOKER
, page 4
LORENA RINCON-CRUZ/The Stanford Daily
 
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STUDENT LIFE
Summer Session bans hard alcohol on campus
By RAVALI REDDY 
SENIOR STAFF WRITER
Students who moved into thedorms for the summer were wel-comed back with an email in-forming them that a new alcoholpolicy would be enforced duringthe duration of this year’s Stan-ford Summer Session.The email, sent by AssistantDean of Stanford Summer Ses-sion Jess Matthews, warned stu-dents that the storage or con-sumption of hard liquor wouldnot be tolerated in dorms duringthe summer. The new policy de-fines hard liquor as “any alcoholicbeverage with an alcohol content20 percent or greater (40 proof orabove). Examples include vodka,rum and whiskey.” The policy ap-plies to all summer residents, re-gardless of age.Those over the legal drinkingage of 21 are allowed to be in pos-session of beer and wine but aresubject to the same consequencesas their underage dormmates if they are found with hard alcohol.This differs from the alcohol pol-icy enforced during the regularacademic year, which does notplace restrictions on studentswho are 21 and older.“This change is a product of several factors,” Matthews said.“Summer Session is a short, in-tensive academic experience,which means that we implementunique policies in order to fosteran academic environment andsupport students so that they canbe successful.”Students who are found to be inpossession of hard alcohol will beasked to pour it out immediatelyand will be subject to a conversa-tion with residential staff regardingways in which they can avoid fur-ther policy violations. Additionalrepercussions will be determinedon a case-by-case basis.While summer resident assis-tants are expected to enforce thepolicy, they are not being told tosearch specifically for hardliquor, Matthews said.The new policy, which was de-veloped in conjunction with theOffice of Alcohol Policy and Ed-ucation (OAPE), stems from theconcern that most of the negativeconsequences associated with al-cohol during the school year arerecorded as having been the di-rect result of hard liquor con-sumption. The email that wassent to students cites hard alcoholas the primary contributor to 100percent of emergency roomtransports and 80 percent of be-havioral issues and police cita-tions during the academic year.According to data compiledby the Stanford University De-partment of Public Safety(SUDPS), the Stanford campussaw a 45 percent increase in med-ical alcohol transports this schoolyear over to last year, resulting ina total of 77 alcohol transports be-tween September 2011 and April2012. Data on the number of Summer Session transports hasnot been tracked by the OAPE.The shortened length of thesummer session in comparison tothe rest of the academic schoolyear is also being cited as a reasonfor the change in policy.“We don’t have the sameamount of time in which to docommunity norming,” Matthewssaid, “so our policy changes canbe perceived as more top-downthan those that occur during theother three quarters.”Despite the OAPE’s advisoryrole in constructing this new poli-cy, there are no plans to imple-ment the change during the regu-lar school year.“This is only a Summer Ses-sion policy,” confirmed Associ-ate Dean of Student AffairsRalph Castro in an email to TheDaily.Dean Castro is, however, in-terested in seeing how the policyplays out over the course of thesummer. He plans on discussingits outcome with the SummerSession staff and would like tohear from students regardingtheir thoughts on the policy andits effectiveness.Students with further ques-tions or concerns can speak withtheir RAs, house directors or JessMatthews for more information.
Contact Ravali Reddy at ravred-dy@stanford.edu.
By CATHERINE ZAW 
STAFF WRITER
The mention of Stanford oftencalls to mind great weather, care-free undergrads on bikes andworld-class professors. But there’sanother group of people who workhard to make sure the University isas clean as its image, and the janito-rial staff here rarely gets much at-tention.One student-led organization isworking to change that.For two hours a week, Stanford janitorial staff members attend anEnglish-language literacy class runby the student organization Habla.There, they practice their conversa-tional skills and build confidence intheir English-speaking abilities.Supported by the Building SkillsPartnership and in collaborationwith the Palo Alto Adult School,Habla hopes to empower adult jan-itors and other low-income workersat Stanford by teaching them Eng-lish-language literacy and conver-sational skills.Habla offers two sessions of theclass, intended to accommodate thetwo shifts of janitorial staff thatwork on campus during the acade-mic year:
Noche 
, or “night” in Span-ish, and
Día
, “day.” Tutoring ses-sions are held twice per week for anhour at a time. The Noche session isheld late at night and Día atlunchtime in El Centro Chicano,near Old Union, but Habla has alsostarted to offer a smaller session onthe Row.The unique program is built on amodel for one-on-one tutoring be-tween Stanford students and the janitorial staff who participate, pair-ing the volunteers with interestedstaff on campus. Student volunteersaren’t required to have any tutoringexperience, just basic Spanish lan-guage and comprehension skills.“One-on-one interaction is thecore part of Habla,” said AdelaideOneal ’12, the outreach and com-munity events coordinator forHabla. Oneal has been tutoring forHabla since her freshman year inthe spring of 2008.“It’s very helpful for the workersto learn one-to-one and go at theirown pace,” she said.Developing a meaningfulfriendship through the teachingprocess between the Stanford stu-dents and janitors is highly encour-aged, and tutors often learn a greatdeal about one another’s interests,families, backgrounds and stories.“Habla has provided a reallyunique experience to get to knowStanford janitors, a community thatmost people don’t interact with,”said Oneal, who still maintains agood relationship with a member of the janitorial staff and past tutee.“Even after I went to studyabroad and he switched to a differ-ent tutor, we still kept in touch,” shesaid. “He was like a fatherly figurewho checked up on me to see if Iwas doing okay and calling my par-ents.”Oneal explained that she joinedHabla because she was interested inan organization that made a differ-ence to the unsung heroes of Stan-ford campus. She believes that herwork is significant because it pro-vides students with an opportunityto engage with these staff whileleaving a positive impact on theirlives, since many of them strugglewith English.“A lot of them don’t feel pre-pared to use English,” she said.“Speaking English might not seemtoo intimidating but it’s differentwhen you don’t have a grasp of thelanguage, and it’s great that Hablais trying to help people with some-thing that is really concrete.”However, the tutors are not theonly learning support provided forthe janitorial staff-turned-students;group instruction and structuredactivities are also held during these
STUDENT LIFE
Habla facilitates language learning between students, janitors
Please see
HABLA 
, page 4
B
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B
OARD OF
D
IRECTORS
Billy Gallagher
President and Editor in Chief 
Margaret Rawson
Business Manager and Chief Operating Officer 
Caroline Caselli
Vice President of Sales
Dan AshtonTheodore GlasserRich JaroslovskyMichael LondgrenBob MichitarianBrendan O’Byrne
E
DITORIAL STAFF
Billy Gallagher
Editor in Chief 
eic@stanforddaily.com
Joseph Beyda
Summer Managing Editor 
 jbeyda@stanford.edu
Ed Ngai & Molly Vorwerck 
 News Editors
edngai@stanford.edumvorwerc@stanford.edu
George Chen
Sports Editor 
 gchen15@stanford.edu
Andrea Hinton
Intermission Editor 
anhinton@stanford.edu
Mehmet Inonu
Photo Editor 
minonu@stanford.edu
Lorena Rincon-Cruz
Graphics Editor 
lorenar2@stanford.edu
Miles Unterreiner
Opinions Editor 
milesu1@stanford.edu
Matt Olson
Copy Editor 
maolson@stanford.edu
Cover art by
Lorena Rincon-Cruz

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