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CROSSROADS -Book One-Notes From an Afrikan P.O.W. Journal

CROSSROADS -Book One-Notes From an Afrikan P.O.W. Journal

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Published by Rbg Street Scholar
Notes From An Afrikan P.O.W. Journal Book One, 1977 is available as a PDF.

Reflections On The "Prison Movement"

1. On Transforming the Colonial/Criminal Mentality
2. Afrikan P.O.W.'s And The United Nations
3. SPO "Prison Movement" Discussion Paper No. 1: Contributions Toward The National Prisoners Movement
4. SPO "Prison Movement" Discussion Paper No. 2: The "Prison Movement" And National Liberation
Notes From An Afrikan P.O.W. Journal Book One, 1977 is available as a PDF.

Reflections On The "Prison Movement"

1. On Transforming the Colonial/Criminal Mentality
2. Afrikan P.O.W.'s And The United Nations
3. SPO "Prison Movement" Discussion Paper No. 1: Contributions Toward The National Prisoners Movement
4. SPO "Prison Movement" Discussion Paper No. 2: The "Prison Movement" And National Liberation

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Published by: Rbg Street Scholar on Jul 08, 2012
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01/24/2013

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Spear & Shield Publications • 5206 S. Harper • Chicago, IL 60629 • crsn@aol.com
 
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Spear & Shield Publications • 5206 S. Harper • Chicago, IL 60629 • crsn@aol.com
Notes From An Afrikan P.O.W. JournalBook OneReflections On The “Prison Movement”
1.On Transforming the Colonial/Criminal Mentality ..................................................22.Afrikan P.O.W.’s And The United Nations ..............................................................123.SPO “Prison Movement” Discussion Paper No. 1:Contributions Toward The National Prisoners Movement ......................................134.SPO “Prison Movement” Discussion Paper No. 2:The “Prison Movement” And National Liberation ...................................................20
On Transforming theColonial/CriminalMentality
Revolutions are fought to get control of land, to remove the absentee land-lord and gain control of the land and the institutions that flow from that land. Theblack man has been in a very low condition because he has had no control whatso-ever over any land. He has been a beggar economically, a beggar politically, abeggar socially, a beggar even when it comes to trying to get some education. Thepast type of mentality that was developed in this colonial system among our people,today is being overcome. And as the young ones come up, they know what theywant (land!). And as they listen to your beautiful preaching about democracy andall those other flowery words, they know what they’re supposed to have (land!).So you have a people today who not only know what they want, but alsoknow what they are supposed to have.
 And they themselves are creating another generation
that is coming up that not only will know what it wants and know whatit should have but also will be ready and willing to do whatever is necessary to seethat what they should have materializes immediately.— El Hajj Malik El Shabazz (Malcolm X), “The Black Revolution,”
 Malcolm X Speaks
During a recent conversation with a comrade, the movie
 Battle of Algiers
was mentioned. Its mentioning,within the context of that conversation, gave birth to the idea of using that film as a way of making a comment on thepresent and probable direction that many prisoners are taking and many more will take, in the escalating class andnational liberation struggles in amerikkka.An apology is made in advance, should we make errors in our recollection of events taking place in the film,or the order of their appearance.
 
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Spear & Shield Publications • 5206 S. Harper • Chicago, IL 60629 • crsn@aol.com
I
In the opening scene, or, in one of the early scenes, the setting is a prison, and the principal character was, webelieve, portrayed as Ali Aponte.Ali Aponte, an Algerian who had entered the prison as a “common criminal,” or a “bandit,” was in theprocess of being politicized and of politicizing himself. He was being approached by a revolutionary, a Prisoner of War, who had noticed his strong sense of nationalism and his revolutionary potential; thus, his potential of becominga revolutionary nationalist, rather than his remaining a bandit, a criminal, or a “lumpen” with nationalist sentiments,an emotional commitment to nationalism.i know this already sounds familiar to many. “I’ve been in rebellion all my life. Just didn’t know it.” —Comrade-Brother George Jackson.For a young black growing up in the ghetto, the first rebellion is always crime.For George and Ali Aponte and for many others, in Algiers and in amerikkka. Manyof George’s words are familiar to us.Prisons are not institutionalized on such a massive scale by the people. Most peoplerealize that crime is simply the result of a grossly disproportionate distribution of wealth and privilege, a reflection of the present state of property relations...andWe must educate the people in the real causes of economic crimes. They must bemade to realize that even crimes of passion are the psycho-social effects of aneconomic order that was decadent a hundred years ago. All crime can be traced toobjective socio-economic conditions — socially productive or counterproductiveactivity. In all cases, it is determined by the economic system, the method of eco-nomic organization...Many prisoners (in both minimum and maximum) and even many political prisoners have, We believe, nottaken the interpretation of the above words far enough. We feel this way because many comrades have based manyof their beliefs and positions on the “inherent” revolutionary capacity of “lumpen” on their understanding of theabove-quoted statements. We tend to overlook the fact that George was making a broad analysis; he was describingobjective factors and presenting a general ideological perspective. The grossly disproportionate distribution of wealthand privilege, and the “crime” that results from it, does not automatically make us revolutionaries.The real causes of crime are not necessarily, or, are not alone, the causes of commitments to revolutionarystruggle. Objective economic conditions, the method of economic organization, are not necessarily, not of them-selves, factors which inspire and/or cement conscious activity in revolutionary nationalist people’s war.George described the objective — the economic basis of “crime” — and he recognized that he had beenobjectively in “rebellion” all his life. But he also said: “Just didn’t know it.” He wasn’t
aware
of his acts as beingforms of rebellion. He wasn’t
conscious
of himself as a victim of social injustice. And he wasn’t
consciously
direct-ing his actions toward the destruction of the enemy.I met Marx, Lenin, Trotsky, Engels and Mao...
and they redeemed me
. For the firstfour years, I studied nothing but economics and military ideas. I met the black guerrillas, George “Big Jake” Lewis, and James Carr, W.C. Nolen, Bill Christmas,Tony Gibson and many others.
We attempted to transform the black criminal men-tality into a black revolutionary mentality.
And comrades have asked, in 1977, “What is the difference between the ‘black criminal mentality’ and the‘black revolutionary mentality’?” because they have seen no difference between them. And they saw no differenceprimarily because they read revolutionary actuality into the potentiality alluded to be George in his analysis of the

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