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2008 Spring Clockworks

2008 Spring Clockworks

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Published by Kyle Martel

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Published by: Kyle Martel on Jul 09, 2012
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07/09/2012

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From the President
MARKSCHULMAN
O
n prior occasions, I have discussed with you inthis brief communication the reinventionof Goddard in which your college has beenengaged over my five-year tenure. (Has it really beenthat long? Has it really been that short?) One importantaspect of that reinvention is to see ourselves as others seeus. As you’ll recall from what I wrote last time, this hascome up in reference to the future of progressive highereducation (about which I’ll write more in futurecolumns), especially in reference to the roller coasterride of Antioch College over the last six months. In this
Clockworks 
, I want to discuss how others see us througha somewhat different filter.I’m reading a very interesting book,
 Academic Turnarounds: Restoring Vitality to Challenged AmericanColleges and Universities 
, edited by Terrence MacTaggart.Dr. MacTaggart, who has had a long and distinguishedcareer in higher education administration, served for nineyears on the New England Association of Schools andColleges (NEASC) Commission on Institutions of Higher Education, chairing the commission for threeyears. In that capacity, he has been intimately familiar with details of our recent history, in which NEASC, ourregional accrediting body, plays a (let’s just say) majorsupporting role.In
 Academic Turnarounds 
, which was publishedin2007 and based on research involving more than threedozen institutions, here is what he has to say aboutGoddard:“And some academic turnarounds require a significantdismemberment. Trustees of GoddardCollege faced theprospects of going bankrupt or selling off the campusand its programs. Beset with a low student-faculty ratio and a relatively expensive full-time faculty, thetraditional undergraduate program could not be sus-tained. There were questions regarding continuedaccreditation. Ultimately, the college shut down itsundergraduate program in favor of a low-residency alternative for older students. Closing the traditionalprogram and dismissing its faculty saved the college,and today it is a going concern.”MacTaggart arguesthat restoring financialhealth (Stage I) is a neces-sary but not sufficient stepin a turnaround, andwe cansurely acknowledge thatclosing the ResidentialUndergrad-uate Program was a bold, if painful andcontroversial, plan to movetoward fiscal stability andlong-term sustainability.But there are at least twomore stages in an institu-tion’s turnaround transformation, according toMacTaggart:• Stage II: “branding and marketing” to re-establishor reconfigure (or both) the college’s reputation; and• Stage III: “academic revitalization,” which is char-acterized by substantive, even radical,change, aimed at acomplex and deep revision and re-visioning of the insti-tutional identity.Suggesting that a major problem for most dis-tressed institutions is that they remain frozen in Stage I,in which they “resemble neighborhood conveniencestores,” MacTaggart describes through case studies andilluminates through extensive analysis what must be doneto accomplisha transformation.I can’t say for sure whether Goddard is in Stage II orStage III: maybe both simultaneously? But I am certain we have not been, are not, and will not be stuck in StageI. While we will maintainour vigilance of our financialsituation, we will at the same time go beyond being a“going concern” to become a growing concern, sustain-able, socially responsible, academically rigorous, and inno-vative.Our reinvention will in some ways take us back to thefuture: Goddard’s coming as one of the premier institu-tions of progressive higher education into a bright,exciting, collaboratively-constructed newness.
WHILE WE WILL MAINTAIN OUR VIGILANCE OF OUR FINANCIAL SITUATION, WE WILL AT THESAME TIME GO BEYOND BEING A “GOING CONCERN” TO BECOME A GROWING CONCERN,SUSTAINABLE, SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE, ACADEMICALLY RIGOROUS, AND INNOVATIVE.
3
CLOCKWORKS WINTER/SPRING 2008
 
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CLOCKWORKS WINTER/SPRING 2008
alumni/aeportfolio
OPEN RANGE:POETRY OF THEREIMAGINED WEST
Laurie Wagner Buyer (MFA ’01)This formidable collection of contemporary poetry embraces the West of personal con-viction. Buyer and co-editor WC Jameson have assembledthe work of 20 writers whose poems compellingly andmemorably represent the modern West.
Ghost Road Press (2007), $13.95 
VALOR:FILIPINO WORLD WAR IIVETERANS MEMORIAL
Cheri Gaulke (GGP ’78)Over 120,000 Filipino soldiers fought in World War II as the U.S. Army Forces inthe Far East, yet Congress stripped theFilipino veterans of the benefits they hadbeen promised. The Filipino World War IIVeterans Memorial in Los Angeles tells theveterans’ story. This book documents thecontent, design and historic context of thememorial designed by Gaulke.
 Midmarch Arts Press (2007)
DRESSED:A CENTURY OFHOLLYWOOD COSTUME DESIGN
Deborah Nadoolman Landis (RUP ’73)From the lavish productions of Hollywood’sGolden Age through the high-tech block-busters of today, the most memorablemovies all have one thing in common: they rely on the magical transformations ren-dered by the costume designer. Academy  Award–nominated costume designer Landisshowcases 100 years of Holly-wood’s mosttantalizing costumes.
Collins Design (2007), $75 
WINTERS’ WAR
Matthew P. Mayo (MFAW ’03)Niall Winters returns from selling his fallherd to find his ranch a burned ruin, hisuncle dead, his wife missing, and the bliz-zard covering any clues with a whole lot of snow. He heads into the raging maw of thestorm determined to confront this demonand salvage the remains of his family’s shat-tered lives. But he has no idea of the horrorsthat await him.
Robert Hale, Ltd. (2007), $24.78 
INTUITION RETREAT:YOU HAVE ALLTHE EQUIPMENT ...LEARN HOW ITOPERATES
Max Highstein (RUP ’73)
Intuition Retreat 
is a wonderfully multi-dimensional program. The workbook, CDs with exercises and music, and the intuitioncards come together in way that makes thisa sophisticated and powerful tool for devel-oping intuition.
Desert Heart Multimedia (2007),$84.95 
THE ELEMENTS OF PERSUASION
Richard Maxwell (RUP ’70) andRobert Dickman (RUP ’70)“Every great leader is a great storyteller,”according to Harvard University psycholo-gist Howard Gardner. In
The Elements of Persuasion
, Maxwell and Dickman teach youhow to tell stories. They show how story-telling relates to every industry and how anyone can benefit from its power.
Collins (2007), $19.95 

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