Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
11Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
STONE ARABIA: A Novel by Dana Spiotta

STONE ARABIA: A Novel by Dana Spiotta

Ratings:

3.7

(50)
|Views: 465 |Likes:
Published by Simon and Schuster
Stone Arabia, Dana Spiotta’s moving and intrepid third novel, is about family, obsession, memory, and the urge to create—in isolation, at the margins of our winner-take-all culture.

In the sibling relationship, “there are no first impressions, no seductions, no getting to know each other,” says Denise Kranis. For her and her brother, Nik, now in their forties, no relationship is more significant. They grew up in Los Angeles in the late seventies and early eighties. Nik was always the artist, always wrote music, always had a band. Now he makes his art in private, obsessively documenting the work, but never testing it in the world. Denise remains Nik’s most passionate and acute audience, sometimes his only audience. She is also her family’s first defense against the world’s fragility. Friends die, their mother’s memory and mind unravel, and the news of global catastrophe and individual tragedy haunts Denise. When her daughter, Ada, decides to make a film about Nik, everyone’s vulnerabilities seem to escalate.

Dana Spiotta has established herself as a “singularly powerful and provocative writer” (The Boston Globe) whose work is fiercely original. Stone Arabia—riveting, unnerving, and strangely beautiful—reexamines what it means to be an artist and redefines the ties that bind.
Stone Arabia, Dana Spiotta’s moving and intrepid third novel, is about family, obsession, memory, and the urge to create—in isolation, at the margins of our winner-take-all culture.

In the sibling relationship, “there are no first impressions, no seductions, no getting to know each other,” says Denise Kranis. For her and her brother, Nik, now in their forties, no relationship is more significant. They grew up in Los Angeles in the late seventies and early eighties. Nik was always the artist, always wrote music, always had a band. Now he makes his art in private, obsessively documenting the work, but never testing it in the world. Denise remains Nik’s most passionate and acute audience, sometimes his only audience. She is also her family’s first defense against the world’s fragility. Friends die, their mother’s memory and mind unravel, and the news of global catastrophe and individual tragedy haunts Denise. When her daughter, Ada, decides to make a film about Nik, everyone’s vulnerabilities seem to escalate.

Dana Spiotta has established herself as a “singularly powerful and provocative writer” (The Boston Globe) whose work is fiercely original. Stone Arabia—riveting, unnerving, and strangely beautiful—reexamines what it means to be an artist and redefines the ties that bind.

More info:

Publish date: Jul 10, 2012
Added to Scribd: Jul 09, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Buy the full version from:AmazonBarnes & Noble
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

08/21/2013

pdf

text

original

 
“In this novel about siblings, music, teen desire,and adult decay, Spiotta reaches ever deeper,tracking her characters’ sweet, dangerousAmerican dreaming with glorious precision.”
–sam lipsyte, author of
the ask 
Transfxing. . . as though Nabokov had writtena rock novel.”
- entertainment weekly
“Dreamlike. . . haunting.”
- jennifer egan
“From the frst page I was won overby Spiotta’s intelligence, charm, and empathy.I loved it.”
–patrick d
e
witt, author of
the sisters brothers 
“Gritty, intelligent. . . a work o visceral honesty and real beauty.”
–kate christensen, author of
the astral
“An essential American writer.”
–jonathan dee
 
Te beauty or which I aim needs little to appear—unbelievablylittle. Anyplace—the most destitute—is good enough or it.
 Jean Dubuet,
Landscaped ables,Landscapes o the Mind, Stones o Philosophy
 I just wanna stay in the garage all night.
“Garageland,” the Clash, written by Mick Jones and Joe Strummer

Activity (11)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
nmele_4 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Ostensibly about a brother and sister, he self-obsessed and she obsessed with him, this novel strikes me as a profound reflection on our society as it now is.
lissaj_4 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
I liked the idea of this book and the character of Nik Worth is new and genius. Towards the end, though, I felt as if the dots didn't all connect and it was just random musings.
bookfest_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Denise and Nik are brother and sister, orbiting one another. Nik is a musician who creates his own world. His music is self-published and distributed to only a few people. His sister may be his complete audience. Nik creates complex record albums, imaginary fans and writes his own reviews. He keeps detailed journals, Chronicles, that blur reality and his fantasy life. While he creates himself, Denise barely seems to exist, except in response to others -- Nik, her daughter, her mother and the people she sees on the news. She seems to have no barrier between herself and the world she sees. And yet her observations of the world ring so true. The book puts all purpose in life, in reality, to question.
librarianbryan reviewed this
Rated 3/5
Skillful handling of unoriginal material.
aseikonia reviewed this
Rated 5/5
This is one of the best novels I've read in the last few years. To me, this is the book that "A Visit to the Goon Squad" wished it was -- the characters are eccentric but fully realized and dimensional within the confines of a somewhat spare tale. The genius of this work lies in Spiotta's depiction of the ways in which the characters' expectations morph into somewhat deflated middle-aged realizations. This is a brilliant meditation on the nature of obsession, memory and most of all the nature of art itself. It is a thoughtful, precisely written novel that encapsulates broad themes within sharp prose. Spiotta also nails the late seventies and early eighties music scene as perceived through the astute lens of her main characters, Nik and Denise. It is a chronicle of genius, demise and persistence.
ozzer_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Denise is the narrator. She is a 47 year old single mom of Ada. She focuses on her brother who has constructed a fantasy world of his imagined life as a rock star and --less so-- on her mother who is slowly descending into dementia--something she is afraid may foreshadow her own future. She is also bothered by how her life has not become what she thought it would be and concerns about how it is even possible to cope with the world today. Her brother has come up with a satisfying way of coping with his failure, but she is still struggling with hers. The ironic title comes from the name of an Amish town in NY where a girl was abducted. The image of how the Amish reject modernity and self-promotion stands as a counterpoint to the LA superficial and rootless lifestyle that Nik and Denise grew up in. Clearly the Amish have a way of coping with the world by withdrawal, not unlike Nik.I wish Ada and Denise's mom had been developed more. Ada seems to be quite a competent young woman who does not have the self-doubt that her mother has and may have a more realized life--or maybe not? The mother is just an enigma.
gcplreader reviewed this
Rated 5/5
Denise and her older brother Nik grew up in the Los Angeles rock and roll scene of the 70's and 80's. Now middle-aged, Denise lives alone and agonizes over her obsession with stories of suffering on the cable news channels and her own perceived memory loss. Nik, who experienced limited success with his rock band experimentations in his youth, has spent his adult life in relative solitude chronically his music and songwriting that he produces solely for his sister and only a handful of others. Nik is truly a vituoso talent, and like other reclusive artists, he doesn't seem to need an audience to create. The author writes "One wonders, or at least I wonder, what happened to these people? Not the one-hit wonders but the no-hit wonders?"Denise is the responsible one. As she cares for their aging mother who is experiencing dementia, she worries about her own memory. When the author writes of Denise's realization of the memories that we retain, the memories of the body-- of the senses, she truly hits the mark. Perhaps it is because these characters are my age, but I was greatly moved by their experiences and their decisions on how to enter the second halves of their lives. Denise says in my favorite quote--"The second half of my life was just the bill due for the pleasures of the first half." With its shared setting and themes, Stone Arabia makes a wonderful companion read to this year's Pulitzer Prize winner A Visit from the Goon Squad. I may even prefer it.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Jo Cabrera liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->