Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
19Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
GPS Bibliography - Naval Research Laboratory

GPS Bibliography - Naval Research Laboratory

Ratings: (0)|Views: 306 |Likes:

One of the Naval Research Laboratory's greatest accomplishments has been the invention and development of the enabling technologies that became the Global Positioning System (GPS). Like another towering NRL achievement in an earlier generation, radar, GPS has transformed warfare while also providing major benefits to navigation. GPS is not only a global navigation aid, it is also the means for precision time and time transfer throughout the world, which has wide ranging and influential impact on communications and commerce; these features are a direct outcome of the technology envisioned and introduced by NRL scientists and engineers. This bibliography is offered as an aid to those who are interested in better understanding the NRL role in the origins of GPS. Bibliographic citations, primarily of published works, are presented. These are annotated with abstracts, photos, and figures to facilitate selecting which of the referenced papers to examine more closely. A timeline is provided to aid in setting the citations in their context of historical development.

Download on the NRL website http://www.nrl.navy.mil/media/publications/gps/

One of the Naval Research Laboratory's greatest accomplishments has been the invention and development of the enabling technologies that became the Global Positioning System (GPS). Like another towering NRL achievement in an earlier generation, radar, GPS has transformed warfare while also providing major benefits to navigation. GPS is not only a global navigation aid, it is also the means for precision time and time transfer throughout the world, which has wide ranging and influential impact on communications and commerce; these features are a direct outcome of the technology envisioned and introduced by NRL scientists and engineers. This bibliography is offered as an aid to those who are interested in better understanding the NRL role in the origins of GPS. Bibliographic citations, primarily of published works, are presented. These are annotated with abstracts, photos, and figures to facilitate selecting which of the referenced papers to examine more closely. A timeline is provided to aid in setting the citations in their context of historical development.

Download on the NRL website http://www.nrl.navy.mil/media/publications/gps/

More info:

Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: U.S. Naval Research Laboratory on Jul 10, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/17/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Naval Research Laboratory
Washington, DC 20375-5320
NRL GPS B
iBLioGRaPhy
a
N
a
NNotated
B
iBLioGRaPhy
 
of
 
the
 o
RiGiN
 
aNd
d
eveLoPmeNt
 
of
 
the
 G
LoBaL
P
oSitioNiNG
S
yStem
 
at
 
the
 N
avaL
eSeaRch
L
aBoRatoRy
oBeRt
R. W
hitLock 
t
homaS
B. m
c
c
aSkiLL
NRL/mR/1001--09-8988
 
Navigation Technology Satellite – II (Timation IV)
Launched 23 June 1977, 12-hour, circular orbit
NTS-II, the rst satellite completely designed and built by NRL under GPS Joint Program funding,was the rst of a four-satellite constellation congured to demonstrate instantaneous navigationpositioning. The effect of relativity on the onboard cesium atomic clocks was measured andcorrected so that a GPS receiver on Earth could observe that the rate of GPS time is the sameas UTC (Universal Time Coordinated). The clock frequency stability specication of 2 parts per 
10
13
was met. NTS-II was the rst operational NAVSTAR GPS Satellite.
Timation III (Navigation Technology Satellite – I)
Launched 14 July 1974, 8-hour, circular orbit
The third NRL satellite carried a quartz clock and two digitally controlled rubidium atomicclocks — the rst atomic clocks in space. Worldwide time transfer was demonstrated.
Timation I
Launched 31 May 1967, 2-hour, circular orbit
Time navigation, a visionary and patented satellite navigation method for passively measuringrange from the time of ight of transmitted timing signals, was rst demonstrated to Navyand DoD sponsors with the Timation I satellite on 25 October 1967. Now used by the GlobalPositioning System, time navigation requires synchronism between the onboard clock anda clock at the receiver. For the 1967 demonstration, a graphical range-intercept chart wasused to determine the receiver’s (navigator’s) position and clock offset, using three or moremeasurements. Position accuracy in subsequent Timation I demonstrations with moving boats,vehicles, and airplanes was on the order of 1/3 nautical mile.
Timation II
Launched 30 September 1969, 2-hour, circular orbit
Positioning accuracy was improved to 33 meters by transmitting the timing signal simultaneouslyat two frequencies, making possible correction for ionosphere delay. The orbital position of thesatellite was determined to 10 meters. Transatlantic satellite time transfer accuracy of better than one microsecond was achieved between the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, DC,and the Royal Greenwich Observatory in England.
 
NRL GPS B
iBLioGRaPhy
a
N
a
NNotated
B
iBLioGRaPhy
 
of
 
the
 o
RiGiN
 
aNd
d
eveLoPmeNt
 
of
 
the
 G
LoBaL
P
oSitioNiNG
S
yStemat
 
the
 N
avaL
eSeaRch
L
aBoRatoRy
obeRt
R. W
hitlock 
and
t
homas
b. m
c
c
askill
June 3, 2009
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

Activity (19)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
Lars Wirfelt liked this
Atilla Borazan liked this
PHONG279 liked this
ieamm liked this
Maroo Goli liked this
Basir Usman liked this
YuCie Ucop liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download