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Neversink Curriculum Guide

Neversink Curriculum Guide

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Published by Kellie At Walden

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Published by: Kellie At Walden on Jul 11, 2012
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About Neversink:
Along the Arctic Circle lies a small island called Neversink, whose jag-ged clis and ice-gouged rocks are home to a colony o odd-looking seabirds called auks. Chie among them is our hero, Lockley J. Pun. Withtheir oceanront views and plentiul supply o sh, the auks have little torue their eathers, save or Lockley’s two best riends, Egbert, a know-it-all walrus and Ruby a sharp-tongued hummingbird. But all o this isabout to change. Rozbell, the newly crowned king o the Owl Parliament,is dealing with a amine on the mainland o Tytonia just across the bayrom Neversink. He has long had his scheming eyes on the small colony tothe northwest. Now Neversink’s independence hangs in the balance. Aninsurgence o owls will inevitably destroy lie as the auks know it—unlessLockley can do something about it. Barry Wolverton’s debut is an epic taleo some very un-epic birds, a ast-paced and unny story o survival, riend-ship, and sh.
Neversink 
by Barry WolvertonHardcover (ISBN: 978-0-06-202791-7)
Neversink Curriculum Guide
Walden Pond Press was ortunate to work with The National Audubon Society’s Project Pun to puttogether this curriculum guide to use with your students as you read the book 
Neversink 
. The activities inthis guide are recommended or Grades 3 through 6.
About the Author:
Barry Wolverton makes his debut with
Neversink 
, the product o a longtimeinterest in arctic wildowl and Scandinavian olklore. He has also written orNational Geographic, Scholastic.com, and Discovery Networks. Barry livesin Memphis. You can nd him online at www.barrywolverton.com.
Acknowledgements:
Walden Pond Press is grateul to The National Audubon Society’s Project Pun or permission to make useo its extraordinary educational resources. Project Pun scientists work on the Maine coast to bring Atlan-tic Puns and other seabirds back to islands where they once lived but had disappeared, due to hunting,in the late 1800’s. The scientists, many o them young and dedicated college students, live directly on theislands where the birds nest, and help protect them rom disturbances, while studying and banding them.Since 1973
,
Project Pun has restored three pun colonies, with about 1200 pairs o birds currently nest-ing, as well as 8000 pairs o migratory Terns, including some on the endangered species list.For more inormation about Project Pun, please see: http://www.projectpun.org
Walden Pond Press and the skipping stone logo are trademarks o Walden Media, LLC.www.walden.com/bookswww.harpercollinschildrens.com
 
Objective:
To eel how a layer o at helps insulatethe body rom the chilling eects o cold water.
Time:
About hal a class period or so
Materials:
 
A can or two of Crisco shorteningA dozen or more quart-sized zipping plastic bagsDuct TapeSeveral basins of icy, cold water
Method:
Measure one cup o shortening and place
it in a quart-sized zipping plastic bag. Turn a second
bag inside out and put it inside the bag with the shortening, being sure to reverse the zipper tr
a
cks. Zipthe bags together. For added protection, seal the bags around the zipper with duct tape. Push the short-ening around, rom the outside, to distribute it evenly in the “mitt.”For each mitt with shortening make an empty mitt, without shortening. These mitts will be used to com-pare with the insulated models.Give each student a chance to place one hand in an empty mitt and one in an insulated mitt (with theshortening). Then ask the student to place both hands in a basin or sink o icy, cold water. What happens?(Since this process doesn’t take very long, you can get by with making only a ew sets o mitts and takingturns with them.)
Activity 1: Why Puns Don’t Freeze
© 2011 by Project Pun The weather on Neversink is pretty dreadul—rugged, wintry, windy and bleak or most o the year. Howdoes a little pun like Lockley keep warm in spite o deep Arctic chill? All it takes is a
some b
lubber—alayer o at beneath the skin. Try this experiment to see what we mean.
Discussion:
While it is well known that marine mammals suchas whales, seals, and polar bears have thick layers o at to helpkeep them warm, northern seabirds such as puns also rely oninternal layers o at to help them survive rigid arctic waters. This at, combined with their external water-repelling and air-trapping coat o eathers, allows seabirds to live in a seeminglyharsh environment. (Older students could research other adap-tations to the cold, or birds as well as other lie orms.)
Photo courtesy o Stephen Kressand www.projectpun.org
    P    h   o   t   o   c   o   u   r   t   e   s   y   o        S   t   e   p    h   e   n    K   r   e   s   s   a   n    d   w   w   w .   p   r   o    j   e   c   t   p   u    f   n .   o   r   g
Walden Pond Press and the skipping stone logo are trademarks o Walden Media, LLC.www.walden.com/bookswww.harpercollinschildrens.com

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