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WEEKLY 07.12.12

WEEKLY 07.12.12

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Print edition of The Stanford Daily, published July 12, 2012.
Print edition of The Stanford Daily, published July 12, 2012.

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 The Stanford Daily
 An Independent Publication
THURSDAYVolume 242
July 12, 2012Issue 2
SUMMER WEEKLY EDITION
Opinions 5
Was the International Olympic Committee justified in defining competition gender by hormones?
Sports 6
 Remembering the life and career of former Stanford basketball forward Peter Sauer
Intermission12
 Singer Frank Ocean talks heartbreak, history and healing in his debut album ‘channel ORANGE’
 
By EDITH PRECIADO
CONTRIBUTING WRITER
From developing open platforms for educationalstart-ups to helping empower at-risk youth in Red-wood City, several Stanford students working atStanford or in the Bay Area this summer are foster-ing close mentorships as part of their summer work.Joseph Abbott ’14, a computer science major cur-rently living in Crothers, hopes to hone in on his inter-ests in computer science and education through an in-ternship with Root-1, an educational start-up basedin Mountain View. He complements this internshipwith tutoring on the side.Just one year since its founding, Root-1 has testednew platforms for education with charter schoolsaround the Bay Area. The start-up focuses on mid-dle- and high school-level content and creates appli-cations with an open platform for teachers to addoriginal or available content to games. Subjects rangefrom vocabulary and sentence structure to mathe-matics.One of the most definitive aspects of Abbott’s ex-perience this summer is his close work with severalex-Google engineers in his company.“We found out that every engineer had one internmatched up,” Abbott said, adding that because of this, his learning experience so far has much more en-riching and demanding than previous summer jobs.Last summer, Abbott tutored in his hometown inTexas.“My appointed engineer and I actually have a lotin common, and I think that’s why we were pairedup,” he said. “He is extremely thorough and paysgreat attention to detail. That is something I really ap-preciate as a novice in programming who is just tryingto get a feel for how industry-quality code looks andworks.”For Patrick Lee ’14, an intended chemistry major,his summer job performing research for the Depart-ment of Chemistry is his first real job. Lee received aBing Grant to work in Professor Chaitan Khosla’schemistry lab doing research on inhibitors of bacteriawith a Type III secretion system, such as salmonella,yersinia and chlamydia. Lee says the project is vital
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STUDENT LIFE
Students frustrated bylines at Arrillaga dining
By RACHEL BEYDA 
DAILY INTERN
It’s 6 p.m. on a Thursday.High school students in suitssurround the doors of the Ar-rillaga Family Dining Com-mons business conferenceattendees.Inside the building, thestairs are crammed with stu-dents dodging dozens of sum-mer campers traveling up anddown. The line extends downthe stairs, but today is not asbad as when it extends outsideor wraps around to EscondidoRoad. As I move farther upthe line, a whiteboard with acolorfully written schedule onit becomes visible: Eight sum-mer programs are scheduledto dine at Arrillaga between 5p.m. and 6:15 p.m.With most dining halls re-served for summer confer-ences or closed for renova-tions, Arrillaga is the only din-ing hall open to students, fac-ulty and staff this summer.With The Axe and Palmclosed, Olives staying open forshorter hours and LagunitaDining only serving studentsliving in certain residences,students are left with limitedsummer dining options.Once through the crowd, Iswipe through, only to be metwith many shorter lines tobrave. In the background of aloud sea of voices, I hear dish-es fall to the floor. Lines formup behind the silverware, thedrink machine and the frozenyogurt, and even French friesrequire a wait.After finally getting myfood, I meet the next obstacle:seating. High school studentsfill the tables, with the occa-sional Stanford student scat-tered about. A girl passes me,complaining to her friend thatthere is nowhere to sit. I lookaround and see she’s right. Icheck outside on the balcony,with no luck. I take a peek atthe other side of the dininghall. Also full. Finally, some-one gets up to leave, and I takehis spot.“It’s super crowded andthey run out of food quickly,”said Jessica Waldman ’15. “I’mspending my whole paycheckon this meal plan, but the placeis being taken over by high
UNIVERSITY
The humble beginnings of a sandwich superstar
By DAVID ENG
DAILY INTERN
Ike Shehadeh had reached his break-ing point.The 29-year-old San Francisco nativehad dropped out of college to start a super-market business, only to see it fall apart afew years later. He was sleeping anywherehe could, including in vans and on friends’couches — pretty much anywhere hecould find shelter. For months, he evencalled an abandoned warehouse withoutelectricity his home.“I felt terrible,” Shehadeh said, reflect-ing on the experience. “I needed to get outof there. I wanted to make sure that I wasgoing to at least try my business.”So on Halloween in 2007, just threemonths after he was bagging groceries at alocal Trader Joe’s grocery store, Shehadehopened up shop in San Francisco’s Castroneighborhood — a modest 400-square-foot hole-in-the-wall sandwich eatery. Hecalled it Ike’s Place.That first night, Shehadeh didn’t sell asingle sandwich.“It was one of the worst days of mylife,” he said.Nearly five years later, customers whogorge themselves on one of the 20,000
Students use their summer breaks to find and become teachers to others
STUDENT LIFE
Learning howto be a mentor
MEHMET INONU/The Stanford Daily
Long lines of high school students attending summer camps coupled with Stanford students living on campusthis quarter crowd Arrillaga Family Dining Commons.
Please see
IKE
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LINES
, page 4Please see
MENTOR 
, page 4
 
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By AMRUTHA DORAI
DAILY INTERN
Although the July 3 announcement regard-ing the discovery of the Higgs boson particlewas made in Geneva, Switzerland, physicists atthe SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory inMenlo Park were anything but distanced fromthe discovery.Some Stanford researchers were there inGeneva. Ten Stanford-affiliated physicistswere on location working for CERN at the Eu-ropean Laboratory for Particle Physics, somewere in attendance at the International Confer-ence of High Energy Physics in Melbourne,Australia, and some 25 theorists and six experi-mentalists waited until midnight to watch theannouncement from SLAC itself.The announcement revealed the findings of two independent research projects based at theLarge Hadron Collider in Geneva — CompactMuon Solenoid (CMS) and ATLAS — whichconfirmed the existence of a particle that fit theprofile constructed for the Higgs boson afteryears of speculation. Several SLAC physicistsplayed a role in the ATLAS project.“We saw the . . . reconstructed mass fromthe two experiments was roughly the same, 125to 126 gigaelectron volts,” said SLAC experi-mental physicist Tim Barklow. “They both sawroughly the same signal and the same decaymodes and roughly the same mass. And theyboth achieved that independently, so it was justabsolute confirmation that a new particle hadbeen seen.”The important discovery of the particle re-sulted in an outpouring of praise and awe fromscientists across the globe. The Higgs bosonwould explain the origin of mass through the es-tablishment of a Higgs field, a ubiquitous quan-tum field responsibly for giving elementary par-ticles their mass.“What’s important is this thing called theHiggs field . . . and that’s what makes thingshave mass, that’s what makes things evenexist,” said Andy Freeberg, director of mediarelations for SLAC. “So finding this Higgsboson, this particle, is sort of evidence for thefact that the Higgs field exists.”Freeberg compares the Higgs field to a mag-netic field. While in a magnetic field, objects areacted upon based on their mass, and a Higgsfield would in and of itself determine this mass.The mass would be decided based on the extentto which the Higgs field interacts with differenttypes of particles.“The Higgs boson confirms what has been acrucial part of our understanding of subatomicparticles for several decades,” Barklow said.“[It] has been theorized to give mass to all thefundamental particles in nature. And . . . theparticle associated with this Higgs field has nowbeen discovered after decades of searching.”On top of the 40-odd SLAC physicists who-played a direct role in the ATLAS project, re-search conducted at SLAC in the 1990s alsopaved the way for the discovery of the particle.Although SLAC’s particle collider is no longerin use, it facilitated research on the Z boson, an-other elementary particle. The understanding of the Z boson “helped determined where to lookfor the Higgs boson,” according to Freeburg.Despite this landmark discovery in physics,however, both Barklow and Freeberg say thatthere is still much more ground to cover. Thecomplexities of the Higgs boson and Higgs fieldstill need to be mapped out. Their hope is thatpinning down these specifics will allow theworld of physics to apply this knowledge toother pressing questions, such as the existenceof supersymmetry.“This really key model, the standard modelof physics, works,” Freeburg said, “and all of the major pieces are potentially now in place.”
Contact Amrutha Dorai at amrutha.dorai@gmail.com.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
 ASSU Executive plans to shrink cabinet, give less in stipends
By SAMANTHA GILBERT
DAILY INTERN
The 2012-2013 ASSU Executive cabinetwill be significantly smaller and cost lessmoney, according to incoming ASSU Presi-dent Robbie Zimbroff ’12.“This year’s cabinet is going to be muchleaner than last year’s,” Zimbroff said in anemail to The Daily. “The target number isaround three or four people.” That’s a signif-icant cut from the 19 appointed by 2011-2012ASSU Executive Michael Cruz ’12 and Stew-art Macgregor-Dennis ’13.“[The change] also coincides with a shiftin philosophy,” he said. “The main impetusfor change is . . . common sense, just doingwhat will work . . . instead of having a ‘Chairof Food’ or a ‘Chair of Social Entrepreneur-ship.’”Noting the need for greater diversity,Zimbroff and his vice president, WilliamWagstaff ’12, have not designated specificcabinet roles on the application. “We arelooking for people that come from diverseacademic and co-curricular backgrounds,”Zimbroff said.“Our cabinet members will have experi-ence interacting with administrators and theresourcefulness to handle student issues inseveral different areas,” Wagstaff said. “Oneof the best things cabinet members can do ishave a sense of ‘the bigger picture,’ how allthe moving parts of student life fit together.”Along with fewer cabinet members,salaries are expected to change as well.$7,000 was set aside for the executive cabinetfrom the past fiscal year’s budget, and Zim-broff believes the full amount will not beused this year because of the changes.“How much of [the budget] we actuallyuse to pay our cabinet depends on the [exact]number of people we end up hiring,” he said.“The money unused for . . . stipends will beallocated back to student activities duringthe year.”“Generally, the cabinet members will bepaid more, because there are fewer of them,”he added.A third change that will occur is the sepa-ration of the Community Action Board(CAB) from the ASSU Executive. Accord-ing to Wagstaff, the CAB will now functionas an ASSU-chartered organization underthe advisement of Tommy Lee Woon, asso-ciate dean of educational resources.“The idea behind this change was to makethe CAB a stable body at Stanford, indepen-dent of the changing priorities of the ASSUExecutive, and to increase the institutionalknowledge with support from administra-tors,” Wagstaff said.With the changes to the CAB, decreasingsalary payout across the cabinet and a de-crease in the number of people involved,Zimbroff and Wagstaff hope to stress team-work and create a streamlined, balanced Ex-ecutive.“The goal is to create a tight-knit team,”Zimbroff said. “Strong teams work well bal-ancing individual and group efforts, andthat’s what we’re shooting for here.”
Contact Samantha Gilbert at samanthag.nbtb12@gmail.com.
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Billy Gallagher
President and Editor in Chief 
Margaret Rawson
Business Manager and Chief Operating Officer 
Caroline Caselli
Vice President of Sales
Dan AshtonTheodore GlasserRich JaroslovskyMichael LondgrenBob MichitarianBrendan O’Byrne
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DITORIAL STAFF
Billy Gallagher
Editor in Chief 
eic@stanforddaily.com
Joseph Beyda
Summer Managing Editor 
 jbeyda@stanford.edu
Ed Ngai & Molly Vorwerck 
 News Editors
edngai@stanford.edumvorwerc@stanford.edu
George Chen
Sports Editor 
 gchen15@stanford.edu
Andrea Hinton
Intermission Editor 
anhinton@stanford.edu
Mehmet Inonu
Photo Editor 
minonu@stanford.edu
Lorena Rincon-Cruz
Graphics Editor 
lorenar2@stanford.edu
Miles Unterreiner
Opinions Editor 
milesu1@stanford.edu
Matt Olson
Copy Editor 
maolson@stanford.edu
Cover art by
Lorena Rincon-Cruz
OLLIE KHAKWANI/The Stanford Daily
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
SLAC scientists react to Higgs

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