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Water Infrastructure Stimulus & Jobs Package

Water Infrastructure Stimulus & Jobs Package

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Published by Lyle Brecht
Water systems are under increasing pressure to improve aging treatment technology and distribution systems to deliver safe water to the public. Many communities also need to consider augmenting existing water supplies to meet increasing demand and changing water availability due to climate change. Community and non-community water systems will need to invest $276.8 billion over the next 20 years to meet deferred maintenance on aging water distribution systems and water treatment plants, and supply augmentation.
Water systems are under increasing pressure to improve aging treatment technology and distribution systems to deliver safe water to the public. Many communities also need to consider augmenting existing water supplies to meet increasing demand and changing water availability due to climate change. Community and non-community water systems will need to invest $276.8 billion over the next 20 years to meet deferred maintenance on aging water distribution systems and water treatment plants, and supply augmentation.

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Published by: Lyle Brecht on Jan 09, 2009
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12/29/2012

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STIMULUS PACKAGE FOR THE NATION’S AILINGWATER SUPPLY INFRASTRUCTURE
TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION & CAPITAL REALLOCATION FOR ECONOMIC GROWTHLYLE BRECHTJANUARY 9, 2009
CAPITAL MARKETS RESEARCH
Innovation & Reallocation for Economic Growth
56 Brooks Ln, Sewanee, TN 37375telephone: 931-598-0050fax: 931-598-0051http://www.scribd.com/
 
Stimulus PackageFor the Nation’s Ailing Water Supply Infrastructure
Today’s U.S. national water supply infrastructure is in need of repair
 About 12.5% of the freshwater we use each year is for public water supply.
1
In 1950, about 60% of U.S. population obtained its freshwater from public supply; today about 85%. Between 1950-2000public water consumption tripled. There are 74,400 water systems in the U.S.
2
For some watersystems, only about 60%-70% of the treated water reaches the customer.
3
Real losses occur fromleaks and line breaks. Also, not all the water that reaches the customer is properly measured orpaid for as revenue losses occur from old, inaccurate meters. Water systems are under increasingpressure to improve aging treatment technology to deliver safe water to the public. Community andnon-community water systems will need to invest $276.8 billion over the next 20 years to meet de-ferred maintenance on aging water distribution systems and water treatment plants, and for supplyaugmentation.
4
 
TVA Kingston plant coal ash spill - Dec. 22, 2008Atlanta reservoir - 2007 100-year droughtDec 23, 2008 water main break, Bethesda, MD
CAPITAL MARKETS RESEARCH
Lyle Brecht - January 9, 2009
Economic Stimulus Package for Water Systems Infrastructure1
1
U.S. annual freshwater use in 2000: 39.7% irrigation; 39.4% thermoelectric power; 12.5% public supply;5.4% industrial; 3.0% self-supplied domestic, livestock, aquaculture, mining. “Estimated Use of Water in theUnited States in 2000,” USGS (rev. February 2005).
2
For example, there are 484 active community pubic water systems and approximately 500 non-communitypublic water systems in Tennessee. Approximately 133 of the community systems buy their water from an-other water system. Of the 351 community water systems with their own water supply, 148 use surface wa-ter, 158 use underground aquifers and 45 use ground water that is influenced by surface water.
3
 
 AWWA Water Loss Control Committee, “Applying Worldwide BMPs in Water Loss Control,”
 AWWA Journal 
 95:8 (August 2003), 65-79.
4
‘2003 Drinking Water Infrastructure Needs Survey and Assessment,” USEPA, released in 2005, is basedon data collected from utilities in 2003. EPA found that the nation's 53,000 community water systems and21,400 not-for-profit non-community water systems will need to invest an estimated $276.8 billion between2003 and 2023.
 
Sufficient potable freshwater is a basic requirement for economic growth. Today, the nation’s watersupply is in distress because: (1) climate change alters rainfall patterns and sometimes makesdroughts more frequent, more intense, and longer-lasting; (2) pollution reduces clean water fromaquifers and surface waters; and (3) efforts to privatize and commodify water sometimes reducessupplies available for the public good. New supplies of freshwater are becoming more scare andmore expensive and some watersheds’ have a reduced ability to supply freshwater due to devel-opment pressures. Industrial farming practices may result in depletion of the many of the nation’saquifers. Many of the nation’s rivers, streams, and lakes remain polluted from industrial wastes,runoff from urban areas, and the dumping of raw sewage into these freshwater sources.Many aquifers are being depleted faster than they are being recharged. Pollution from min-ing, agricultural chemicals, and industrial wastes and saltwater intrusion can remain forgenerations in groundwater Some streams are still polluted by agricultural fertilizers, pesti-cides, and industrial and municipal wastes. Sometimes one drop of a hazardous substancecan pollute thousands of liters of water. Increasing demand and more persistent droughtdue to climate change are drying up many lakes. Freshwater demand for all uses increaseseach year. Results: four of five fastest growing metro areas in U.S. have experienced watershortages in past few years: Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, GA; Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, AZ; Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX; and Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario,CA.It has been the driest in almost 500 years in the U.S. southwest. The West’s biggest river,the Colorado, with an average flow of 13 million acre-feet a year in 1950, from 1999-2003averaged 7 million acre-feet, lower than the 1930s dust-bowl years. In 2002 the flow was 3million acre-feet. This flow is consumed and oversubscribed as withdrawal permits wereissued during the time of the Colorado’s maximum historical flow. Humankind’s three fixesto freshwater scarcity: impoundments, diversions, and desalination are frequently no longeran affordable sole solution. Conservation, pollution control, and watershed protectionshould also be considered to keep costs of water supply infrastructure affordable.Bringing the nation’s aging water treatment infrastructure up to present environmental stan-dards of the EU and other industrialized countries is important for the health of the nation’scommunities. Chlorine alone sometimes does not kill all waterborne protozoa, such ascryptosporidium oocysts that sickened 400,000 people in Milwaukee in April 1993; 4,000were hospitalized, 100 people died. Another issue is attending to aging water distributionsystems to avoid the possibility of untreated or contaminated water entering the system.
CAPITAL MARKETS RESEARCH
Lyle Brecht - January 9, 2009
Economic Stimulus Package for Water Systems Infrastructure2

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