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Zombie Spaceship Wasteland: A book by Patton Oswalt

Zombie Spaceship Wasteland: A book by Patton Oswalt

Ratings:

3.31

(102)
|Views: 3,447 |Likes:
Published by Simon and Schuster
Prepare yourself for a journey through the world of Patton Oswalt, one of the most creative, insightful, and hysterical voices on the entertain­ment scene today. Widely known for his roles in the films Big Fan and Ratatouille, as well as the television hit The King of Queens, Patton Oswalt—a staple of Comedy Central—has been amusing audiences for decades. Now, with Zombie Spaceship Wasteland, he offers a fascinating look into his most unusual, and lovable, mindscape.

Oswalt combines memoir with uproarious humor, from snow forts to Dungeons & Dragons to gifts from Grandma that had to be explained. He remem­bers his teen summers spent working in a movie Cineplex and his early years doing stand-up. Readers are also treated to several graphic elements, includ­ing a vampire tale for the rest of us and some greeting cards with a special touch. Then there’s the book’s centerpiece, which posits that before all young creative minds have anything to write about, they will home in on one of three story lines: zom­bies, spaceships, or wastelands.

Oswalt chose wastelands, and ever since he has been mining our society’s wasteland for perversion and excess, pop culture and fatty foods, indie rock and single-malt scotch. Zombie Spaceship Wasteland is an inventive account of the evolution of Patton Oswalt’s wildly insightful worldview, sure to indulge his legion of fans and lure many new admirers to his very entertaining “wasteland.”
Prepare yourself for a journey through the world of Patton Oswalt, one of the most creative, insightful, and hysterical voices on the entertain­ment scene today. Widely known for his roles in the films Big Fan and Ratatouille, as well as the television hit The King of Queens, Patton Oswalt—a staple of Comedy Central—has been amusing audiences for decades. Now, with Zombie Spaceship Wasteland, he offers a fascinating look into his most unusual, and lovable, mindscape.

Oswalt combines memoir with uproarious humor, from snow forts to Dungeons & Dragons to gifts from Grandma that had to be explained. He remem­bers his teen summers spent working in a movie Cineplex and his early years doing stand-up. Readers are also treated to several graphic elements, includ­ing a vampire tale for the rest of us and some greeting cards with a special touch. Then there’s the book’s centerpiece, which posits that before all young creative minds have anything to write about, they will home in on one of three story lines: zom­bies, spaceships, or wastelands.

Oswalt chose wastelands, and ever since he has been mining our society’s wasteland for perversion and excess, pop culture and fatty foods, indie rock and single-malt scotch. Zombie Spaceship Wasteland is an inventive account of the evolution of Patton Oswalt’s wildly insightful worldview, sure to indulge his legion of fans and lure many new admirers to his very entertaining “wasteland.”

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Publish date: Nov 8, 2011
Added to Scribd: Jul 12, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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09/24/2013

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Activity (58)

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akmargie reviewed this
Rated 3/5
An odd memoir that is a mix of stories and bits. Oswalt does a good job narrating and Hobo songs were a nice touch.
laneliterati reviewed this
Rated 3/5
Highly sarcastic, funny, touching and unflinchingly honest. Great for an older teen, who has felt odd and out of place. *Mature language and themes
hedrigall reviewed this
Rated 3/5
It was mostly good, but some of the pieces fell flat. This would be forgivable if the book was longer. Like, at least a hundred pages longer.In the long run I'd rather just watch his DVDs again.
sallowswine reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Patton Oswalt has always been one of my favorite comedians, and this book apes and expands on his comedic persona (and personal life) with over-the-top drawn out descriptive passages and level 2 obscure references (Roxy Music's Avalon, North Dallas Forty).I must say though, if you're not a male aged 18-29 it might not be up your alley. Beware: here be (Dungeons and) dragons.
matthew254 reviewed this
Rated 2/5
Zombie Spaceship Wasteland was another disappointment; this time, from a very funny guy who could have done much more than this sad excuse of a memoir. Contents include two funny stories; one from a bad comedy tour another from his teenage experience of working at a movie theater. The rest is a hodge-podge of self-important garbage. Really wanted this to be good but it wasn't meant to be.
manandwife reviewed this
I feel like this one was highly self-indulgent. I am a fan of Oswalt's and regardless of what you feel about this book his stand-up is some of the best in America today. However, I have the acumen to realize that half of the reason I enjoyed this book as much as I did is because Patton and I have a great deal of similar cultural background. I think many people unfamiliar with places like Reston Towncenter and its effect on the culture of Northern Virginia will come out feeling a little lost.That said it is still very funny, mostly cover to cover, and offers a great bit of insight into the world of the late 80s-early 90s comedy scene from the kind of person that doesn't find airline peanuts particularly funny. I found it informative and amusing and short. If he keeps it up his next one will most likely be absolutely great. This one's good for what it is, but it is a little lacking.Worth it if you're a big fan.
mikewick_1 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
Reading this made me feel like I was the fastest reader on the planet--zoom! Tucked it away in two short hours, during which my wife had to keep asking me why milk was coming out my nose. The essays vary in quality but then again I honestly can say that I didn't understand about a third of the allusions Oswalt made--so who's to say I'm not some uneducated dumbass turning his back on comedic gold. The high points were absolutely hilarious, however and well worth the price of admission.
subbobmail reviewed this
Patton Oswalt has told his share of dick jokes over the course of his career as a standup comic, but his original ambition was to become an author, and he accomplishes that with Zombie Spaceship Wasteland. It's not quite a memoir, not exactly a collection of humorous essays, but something in between. Really the book traces where Oswalt came from and how he left home to assemble his pop-culture sensibility. This could have been horribly tedious and self-indulgent, like an endless message board at The Onion's AV Club, but Oswalt writes well enough to flesh out his tales of working at the movie theater, suffering through hellish gigs as a comedian, and building snow forts in suburbia. He can write an essay arguing that all people are either zombies or spaceships or wastelands -- and make a solid case. He can crack your heart with tales of crazy relatives and make you laugh pretty much any time he likes. This farrago of a book leads one to hope that he will tackle a full-fledged novel one of these days -- preferably featuring an apocalypse, of course. Gotta have a wasteland.
groovybaby_1 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
I work in a bookstore and it isn't often that a new book comes out that I absolutely can't wait for the cheaper paperback edition and feel I have to read right away. I enjoy Patton Oswalt on TV but it was a a piece he for Playboy a few years back comparing life with his crazy stripper ex-girlfriend to life with his lovely wife which had me laughing so hard, tears streaming down my face, that made me pay the 20 some odd bucks I did for this book. I cracked the first few pages and prepared myself for the painful hilarity that I was sure would ensue. Then I kind of shrugged off the next few pages, then I started to feel a little bummed that this book wasn't as funny as I thought it should be. Then I got a little pissed that I paid as much as I did for it but figured since I did pay that much I should see it through to the finish if for no other reason except to tear it to shreds and be able to say I did it. No such luck, Patton Oswalt is one sneaky ass little dude as although the chapters read kind of like the life story of the most boring guy ever when I got to the the last chapter, it seemed like the joke he'd been setting up all along suddenly came to uprorious fruition. It seems that the pivotal point this book is making is to prove that all people fall into one of three catagories but I think he proves with is concluding chapter that all of us who have ever recieved a present from an elderly relative, (and isn't that really all of us, serioulsy all over the world ALL of us?) are actually all ultimately, cut from the same cloth. If you find yourself buying this book and wondering why it's not as funny as Patton Oswalt stand up, wait for it, the punchline is a doozy and well worth the 20 some odd bucks for the book. Tears streaming down my face, it cracked me up to no end.
wjohnston_43 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
I know of Oswalt but I'm not that familiar with his work. But, from the reviews I read this sounded like it would be of interest to me.It's a little bit of everything - some memoir, some humor, some meditations on nerd culture. It's not as uproariously funny as I expected it to be. But there are funny bits, and in the end it left me wanting more. (It's a slim volume - not quite 200 pages.)

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