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Nuclear vs Coal Expense 2011 Forbes News

Nuclear vs Coal Expense 2011 Forbes News

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Published by 555
the chepest one is still hydro power... yeah... (sadly I am a Nuclear Eng...)
the chepest one is still hydro power... yeah... (sadly I am a Nuclear Eng...)

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Published by: 555 on Jul 13, 2012
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07/13/2012

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2011, a 750 MW coal fired power plant cost $2.5 billion, expected to operate at a capacity factor of 71% for the 8,766 hours each year over its 40-year life, producing 187 billion kWhrs, more or less.750 MW x 1000 kW/MW x 0.71 x 8,766 hrs/yr x 40 yrs = 187 billion kWhrsTo produce one trillion kWhrs over their life span will require building about 5 (5.3) of them at acost of about $13.4 billion.Fuelcosts are about 2¢/kWhr @$40/ton of coal, O&M costs areabout 0.6¢/kWhr and decommissioning costs are 0.21¢/kWhr. So to produce a trillion kWhrs fromcoal will cost: $13.3 billion + $20 billion + $6 billion + $2.1 billion = $41.4 billion or 4.1¢/kWhr.This year, the Westinghouse AP1000, a 1,000 MW nuclear power plant, costs $7 billion,operating at a capacity factor of 90% for the 8,766 hours each year over its 60-year life, and will produce 473 billion kWhrs, more or less.1000 MW x 1000 kW/MW x 0.90 x 8,766 hrs/yr x 60 yrs = 473 billion kWhrsTo produce one trillion kWhrs over their life span will require building about 2 (2.1) of them at acost of about $14.8 billion. Fuel costs are about 0.6¢/kWhr for nuclear @$100/lbU
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, O&M costsare about 1.3¢/kWhr and decommissioning costs are 0.11¢/kWhr (if put in the right geology, i.e.,massive salt). So to produce a trillion kWhrs from nuclear will cost: $14.8 billion + $6 billion +$13 billion + $1.1 billion = $34.9 billion or 3.5¢/kWhr. NRG Energyis installing a 92 MW solar array costing $300 million, operating at a capacityfactor of 20% for the 8,766 hours each year over its 25-year life, and will produce 4 billion kWhrs,more or less.92 MW x 1000 kW/MW x 0.20 x 8,766 hrs/yr x 25 yrs = 4.0 billion kWhrsTo produce one trillion kWhrs over their life span will require building 250 of them at a cost of about $75 billion, the most expensive build of any source. But all other costs are the lowest of anysource – fuel costs are zero, O&M costs are only about 0.1¢/kWhr and decommissioning costs areonly 0.08¢/kWhr. So to produce a trillion kWhrs from solar will cost: $75 billion + $0 billion + $1 billion + $0.8 billion = $76.8 billion or 7.7¢/kWhr. Most anticipate that this cost will come downas newer technologies are implemented, such as HPG cells and concentrated solar (seeDavidFerris‘s post on the left), and the capacity factor increases substantially.Finally, The AlaskaEnergyAuthority has been authorized by the State to build a 600 MWhydroelectric plant on the Susitna River which will cost about $3 billion and operate at a capacityfactor of 44% for the 8,766 hours each year over its 80-year expected life, producing 185 billionkWhrs, more or less.600 MW x 1000 kW/MW x 0.44 x 8,766 hrs/yr x 80 yrs = 185 billion kWhrsTo produce one trillion kWhrs over their life span will require building five and a half of them(5.4) at a cost of about $16.2 billion. Fuel costs are zero, O&M costs are0.8¢/kWhr and decommissioning costs are 0.86¢/kWhr (the highest decom cost of any source). So

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