Bloomberg Businessweek

Greece’s Least Wanted Man Lives in Maryland

He fixed the country’s fake stats. Now he faces criminal charges | “This would be funny if it weren’t so tragic”
Georgiou lives in suburban Maryland. He’s appealing a criminal slander conviction in Greece.

For 21 years, Andreas Georgiou worked in relative obscurity as an economist at the International Monetary Fund in Washington. When the European debt crisis hit and his home country of Greece began teetering toward bankruptcy, Georgiou felt a patriotic urge to help. In early 2010 he applied online to run a newly created office designed to clean up Greece’s much maligned economic statistics. He got the job, and in August 2010 he moved to Greece for a five-year term as president of the Hellenic Statistical Authority.

Six years later, rather than being

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