Bloomberg Businessweek

A Texas Election Official Talks Like a Sheriff

Civil rights groups fear threats of charges will scare voters away | “We have every reason to be very, very concerned”

Texas officials have spent years in court fighting to keep their state’s controversial 2011 voter-ID law alive. The law, one of the toughest in the U.S., requires Texans to show some form of government-issued identification at their polling place. Under a court-approved August compromise with the Department of Justice, Texas must allow voters who show up without a driver’s license or other photo ID to sign a sworn affidavit stating that they’d encountered an impediment to obtaining

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