Fortune

BULLIES AND TROLLS

Once a bastion of democratizing free speech, the Internet in 2016 is more of a toxic wasteland.

ONCE UPON A URL, the World Wide Web was a place of fantastic possibility. People went online to meet and befriend total strangers. They could share their passions and opinions on LiveJournal or GeoCities or even Myspace. The democratization of information, no longer controlled and distributed

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Fortune

Fortune11 min read
Big-box Rebound: How Target Packaged A Turnaround
In 2017, the struggling megachain spooked Wall Street and earned mockery in the retail world by committing billions to revamping its stores. That Hail Mary pass connected for a touchdown: Today, more-inviting shopping floors and smoother e-commerce h
Fortune3 min read
Translating Success
IN HIS 41 YEARS ON EARTH SO FAR, Luis von Ahn has changed the world three times. People still blame him for the first. That invention, which had its public debut on Yahoo in 2000, had a mouthful of a name; the Guatemalan-born computer scientist call
Fortune1 min read
A Crimson Phenomenon
TRADITIONALISTS MAY LOOK aghast at CS50, Harvard’s introductory computer science course, which last year became the school’s most popular course of any kind. It’s taught by a young professor in jeans and a black T-shirt, David Malan, whose lectures a