Entrepreneur

From Bedtime to the Boardroom: Why Storytelling Matters in Business

These innovators are connecting with consumers, colleagues and investors on an emotional level.
Source: Shutterstock

It’s one of the biggest buzzwords in business—storytelling—and it’s how savvy companies are satisfying the public’s never-ending hunger for content. With compelling characters, relatable plots and, most important, authenticity, these innovators are connecting with consumers, colleagues and investors on an emotional level. 

“What is a story?”Andrew Linderman asks a group of students, most in their 20s and 30s, who are gathered in a Manhattan classroom for “Storytelling for Entrepreneurs,” a lesson in how to better pitch themselves and their products.   

One student offers a complex definition straight out of a comparative literature class. Linderman, founder of The Story Source, a New York-based coaching and consulting company, shakes his head. Another student raises his hand hesitantly.   

“It has a beginning, middle and end,” he offers.   

“Yes!” Linderman says enthusiastically, writing it on the board.   

For the next few

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