Bloomberg Businessweek

Clean Power Is Too Hot For Even Trump to Cool

Policy changes won’t stop companies’ shift to renewables | “Fears of a negative impact of Trump … are really overblown”

On Nov. 4, Walmart announced an aggressive plan to increase its investments in renewable energy, pledging to power half its operations from wind, solar, and other renewables by 2025 and to cut the carbon footprint of its operations by 18 percent over the same period. Ten days later, Microsoft made its largest wind-power purchase agreement ever, with a deal to buy 237 megawatts of electricity from turbines in Kansas and Wyoming to run data centers in Cheyenne.

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