Fortune

THE BUSINESS OF HUMANITY

Many of the world’s most prominent corporate and nonprofit leaders gathered with Pope Francis for this year’s Fortune + Time Global Forum. Their aim? Forging a new social compact.
His Holiness Pope Francis welcomes Global Forum delegates at the Vatican’s Clementine Hall.

BILLIONS OF PEOPLE in the world are shut out. They have no membership in the financial institutions of life that allow those in richer nations to save, invest, borrow, build, and trade freely. Tens of millions of people, a huge share of them children, have been left stateless by war and poverty; many more live lives of subsistence in remote or rural regions of the world. As transformative as the Internet, mobile payment systems, and microlending have been in bringing many of the “unbanked” into the global economy and in lifting standards of living, too many people still have little or no access to the systems that have brought prosperity to the developed world.

On Dec. 2, nearly 150 of the globe’s most prominent leaders in business,

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