The Atlantic

Why Christians Are Disproportionately Powerful in Congress

The U.S. is becoming more diverse in terms of faith, but its legislature isn’t. A major reason? Non-religious Americans' voting rates.
Source: Charles Dharapak / AP

The 115th Congress is back in session, and at least one thing looks the same as usual: 91 percent of its members identify as Christians. This proportion has basically remained constant for more than five decades, as long as this kind of data has been available, according to a new study from Pew Research Center. What has changed is the U.S. population: Only 71

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