Newsweek

Worms: The $7.5 Billion Industry You Haven’t Heard Of

Little marine worms are hugely expensive.
Blood worms, like other marine worms, are quite expensive, fetching significantly more per weight than lobsters.
Lobster-blood-worms Source: S. Hall

The humble marine worms used to catch fish are some of the most valuable items to come out of the sea, new research shows.

For the first time, scientists have calculated the size and value of this overlooked industry. They estimate 121,000 tons of worms—worth nearly £6 billion ( about $7.5 billion the annual revenue generated by the U.S. sushi industry. The estimate is especially impressive since it pertains to the use of various types of marine worms in the ocean, and doesn’t include freshwater fishing or the use of other live bait such as fish.

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