The Atlantic

The Moon May Be Formed From Many Tiny Moons

New research suggests the moon was the result of a series of smaller collisions rather than a single catastrophe, contradicting a theory that has been widely accepted for over 30 years.
Source: Reuters

When the Apollo astronauts flew to the moon in the 1960s, scientists eagerly awaited the return of lunar rocks they hoped would reveal the origins of the moon billions of years ago. One theory for the moon’s formation, proposed by Charles Darwin’s grandson, George, posited that the early Earth had spun so fast that part of it had flown off. Another theory suggested the moon was born from the same

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