The Atlantic

The Biggest Intelligence Questions Raised by the Trump Dossier

There are even deeper issues here than whether or not the unsubstantiated allegations are true.
Source: Brendan Smialowski / AFP / Getty Images

I’ve spent nearly 20 years looking at intelligence challenges, including failures. That means getting into what I call the “silent but deadly” organizational causes of failure—so while the news tends to gravitate toward the salacious elements of a story like allegations about President-elect Donald Trump that broke Tuesday night, and ask what’s true and what’s not, there are organizational questions that this new reporting raises about how well the intelligence community is working.

With intelligence, the devil really does lie in the details, so it’s important to distinguish between what we know the community has said, and what they don’t know yet. In the

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