The Atlantic

Would You Give Up Perfect Vision for a Trip to Space?

A new study put cancer patients on parabolic flight to see how microgravity worsens astronauts’ eyesight.
Source: NASA

The experience of weightlessness is confusing for human bodies. The eyes tell you you're gently bobbing up and down, while your inner ear screams that you're tumbling about, making you nauseous. The fluids in your body, freed from gravity, float upward, causing head congestion. Bones, suddenly useless in holding you up and moving you around, start thinning out. And something strange can happen

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