Bloomberg Businessweek

Trading Wall Street For Jacksonville

Financial companies “nearshore” jobs to less expensive U.S. cities | “Indian food at 11:30 at night does not exist”

When Deutsche Bank sent senior Wall Street executive Leslie Slover to run its expanding outpost in Jacksonville, Fla., she wasn’t entirely ready for the lifestyle. Gone were the skyscrapers and subways. In their place was a corporate campus with a pond and vast parking lots, flanked by rows of new town houses, some inhabited by employees. The on-site culinary options? A cafeteria and some food trucks. Suddenly, Slover had to relearn to drive.

“It’s hard—it’s not Manhattan,” says Slover, 52, who spent her career in the Northeast before becoming

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