The Atlantic

'The President Went Out of His Way to Recognize the Holocaust'

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer defended the omission of Jews from Trump’s statement with a double act of historical revisionism.
Source: Jonathan Ernst / Reuters

On Friday, the same day that he ordered a halt in the entry of persecuted refugees into the United States, President Trump issued a statement on the Holocaust. In a crisp three paragraphs, Trump said, “It is with a heavy heart and somber mind that we remember and honor the victims, survivors, heroes of the Holocaust. It is impossible to fully fathom the depravity and horror inflicted on innocent people by Nazi terror.” He added that “in the name of the perished,” he would work to prevent such a tragedy again.

Pointedly missing from the statement, as was immediately noticed, was any mention of the Jewish people, of whom roughly 6 million were murdered during the Holocaust. The omission was roundly criticized by Jewish groups

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